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November 03, 1979 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-03

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Page 2-Saturday, November 3, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Senate panel to step up action on $1.5 billion loan
(Continued from Page 1)

Chrysler aid bill outright. Yesterday's
statement showed his goals are more
modest.
"It is my intention to see that the
terms of any legislation reported (out of
his committee) are as tough and
protective of the public interest as
possible," he said.
THEY SHOULD insure maximum
security for the federal guarantees and
maximum participation by the other
parties involved," such as Chrysler's
banks, suppliers and dealers.

He said the sheer size of the $1.5
billion loan guarantee offer is one of the
points he will single out for challenge.
"The level of non-federal par-
ticipation in the Chrysler financial
package should be far higher, and the
federal loan guarantee share far
lower," he said.
THE GOVERNMENT proposal calls
for a 50-50 split, with Chrysler providing
a matching $1.5 billion from private
sources.
While congressional committees took

time off to study the new federal
proposal, the state of Michigan announ-
ced a financial aid pledge likely to in-
crease the political momentum
gathering in Chrysler's favor.
Gov. William Milliken announced
that Michigan will provide the finan-
cially troubled automaker up to $185
million in loans, purchases of Chrysler
land and a novel plan to offer Chrysler
cars as prizes in the state's fund-raising
lotteries.
IN A RELATED development, Rep.

John Conyers (D-Mich.), introduced his
own Chrysler aid bill with features that
might foreshadow some of the amen-
dments Congress will try to write into
the administration proposal.
Conyers said he would not oppose the
higher $1.5 billion figure, but wants 25
per cent of the guarantee - abouit $300
million - devoted by Chrysler for stock
ownership by employees.
He also proposed the loan guarantee

be conditioned on the automaker ex-
panding its board of directors to include
six members of labor, consumer, and
environmental groups.
THE LOAN guarantee legislation got
a boost from economist John Kenneth
Galbraith who said the human factor
connected with such aid "far out-
weighs the cost that is involved."
There "will be many more such
examples" in the future, said
Galbraith, adding that throughout the

world, especially in the European aut,
industry, "a large firm is no longe
allowed to fail."
IN ADDITION to a rough road fo
passage in the Senate, some Hous
members are critical of the proposals.
"Thousands of small businesses are
permitted to go bankrupt each year ant
the federal government certainly is no
there to bail them out," said Rep. Bil
Archer (R-Texas).
"Chrysler and other large companie.
do not deserve special treatment.

Wayne Co.
to receive
$4.5 million
to meet
this week's
payroll

LANSING (UPI) - Gov. William
Milliken yesterday signed legislation
shipping to destitute Wayne County a
$4.5 million payment which county of-
ficials said was desperately needed to
cover this week's payroll.
The payment - which covers the cost
of treating state patients at the Walter
Reuther Long Term Care Facility -
was made in connection with the state's
plan to take over the facility.
IN SIGNING the bill, Milliken
stressed the payment was money the
state owed the county and did not affect
his continuing refusal to provide special
assistance for the floundering county

until its officials initiate government
reorganization steps.
"This is according to an agreement
we had with the county for the
operation of the Reuther facility for
mental health services, going back to
the middle of July," Milliken said.
"It had no part in the discussions that
we're having about reorganizing the
county."
MILLIKEN ADDED, however, that
he is aware the money is much-needed
by the county and he asked that all
possible steps be taken to speed its
delivery.

"Obviously, it will relieve some of the
short-term financial pressure the coun-
ty is feeling and I am pleased to sign
it," he said.
County officials said it appeared
unlikely they could meet their $2.3
million payroll covering 3,350 em-
ployees on time yesterday unless the
money was forthcoming.
THE NATION'S third largest county
faces a $19.3 million deficit.
Layoff notices with a Nov. 12 effec-
tive date were issued to 5,059 county
workers Monday. Officials plan to
recall about 2,400, however, to maintain
basic services.

Milliken believes an unwieldy and ar-
chaic government structure is at least
partially to blame for Wayne County's
financial woes.
HE HAS blocked all special aid to the
county, demanding progress on reform
before the state commits itself to any
bail-out plan.
Earlier this week, the Milliken ad-
ministration announced agreement
with Detroit Mayor Coleman Young on
a reorganization plan.
The bill with the Reuther money also
contains $494,700 for routine first quar-
ter payments to veterans service
organizations.

SChurch Worship Services

Kennedy calls for
ban on new nukes

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-1Y:00 a.m
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
~* * *
NEWPORT FELLOWSHIP
d Free Methodist Church)
1951 Newport Road-665-6100
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
(Nursery and Children's Worship).
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
Robert Henning, Pastor. 663-9526
CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY
Huron Valley Mission
809 Henry St.
668-611: .
Sunday Service 2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA )
Gordon'Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
10:00 a m.-Worship Service.
Free Luncheon will be served im-
nediately following the Worship
Service.
Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m.-Choir Prac-.
Mice.
* * *
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School 9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Bible classes for College Students.
For information call 971-7925
Wilburn C. Hill, Evangelist
Transportation-662-9928
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses :
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs. and Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Rite of Reconciliation - 4 p.m.-
5 p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Rovert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ave.
Fellowship Supported by the
Christian Reformed Church
Clay Libolt
Service 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.-
Minister-Rev. Susan McGarry-"In a
Hungry World, Who Do We Say You
Are?"
* * *
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
727 Miller Rd.
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11 a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Thomas Loper, 663-7306.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Education Asst.: Anne Vesey
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker,'Chaplain
Mike Pennanen, Shirley Polakowski
Sunday-5:00-Gathering for Sing-
ing. Meal at 5:30.
Sunday-6:15-Worship Fellowship.

CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 S. State St.
Rev. Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS
AT ST. ANDREWS CHURCH
306 N. Division
9:00 a.m.-University Study Group.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service with the
Parish-.
12 noon-Luncheon and Student Fel-
lowship.
AT CANTERBURY LOFT
332 S. State St.
6:00 p.m.-Sunday Evening Medi-

From AP and UPI
CHARLESTON, W.Va.-Sen. Edward
Kennedy, warming up his presidential
campaign moth a "sentimental trip" to
West Virginia, called yesterday fora
ban on new nuclear power plants as an
essential ingredient in the nation's
energy future.
Kennedy, in his first out-of-town
speech since forming a presidential
campaign committee, made immediate
mention upon his arrival in Charleston
of the fact the state had once given
another Kennedy campaign a decisive
boost.
"EVERYONE KNOWS this is where
it started for President Kennedy in
1960," Kennedy told supporters and
state officials as he embarked from his
plane at the city's airport.
Meanwhile, in Washington, President
Carter's campaign committee charged
yesterday that Kennedy "deliberately
gave public signals and private en-
couragement" to the draft committees
that sprang up this year to push his pr-
esidential candidacy.
Because of that, the Carter-Mondale
committee formally requested the
Federal Election Commission to rule
that Kennedy was a presidential can-

didate "no later than Sept. 1" and
require that all money collected by the
draft committees after that date be
charged against the senator's fund-
raising limits.
"EVERY TRIP to West Virginia is a
sentimental trip," Kennedy said of the
state that gave his brother a crucial
primary victory in 1960.
Kennedy, who plans to declare his
candidacy next Wednesday in Boston,
used his trip through 'coal-rich West
Virginia to call for a moratorium on
nuclear power plants until safety issues
are resolved.
Kennedy said the presidential com-
mission that investigated the Three
Mile Island accident and issued its
report earlier this week did not go far
enough and should have recommended
a moratorium.4
"THE CHOICE is clear," Kennedy
said in prepared remarks for a Jeffer-
son-Jackson Day dinner.
"The time to act has come," he said.
"If America is going to build nuclear
power plants for the future, we must
build them safely or we must not build
them at all."
Kennedy also said, "One of
America's worst mistakes on energy
has been the gross neglect of coal."

Jobless rate
up; blacks,
women are
(Continued from Page 1)
AT THE White House, press
secretary Jody Powell said he did not
believe anyone could make a projection
for the future on the basis of the Oc-
tober figures. He said the economy
"has been surprisingly resilient in the
face of the substantial drain put upon it
by the increase in the price of imported
oil"
Treasury Secretary G. William
Miller said the October increase was
"consistent with the general trend of
the economy" and that there was
"nothing particularly significant'
about it.
Bowers said it would take several
more months of increases of the
magnitude of the October rise to say
that unemployment was defittely'
rising as the result of slower economic
growth.
BUT JANET Norwood, the com-
missioner of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, told a congressional commit-
tee that the October employment report
does "reflect a clear slowdown in the
rate of employment growth."
While total employment has in
creased 2.1 million during the past
year, less than one-fourth of the gain, or
451,000 jobs, have been created in the
past eight months.
After rails arrive at a suitable
habitat, they often lose their power of
sustained flight. When the birds settle,
they colonize and gradually give up
their migratory patterns, says the
American Museum of Natural History..

tation.

* *

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. College Student Fellowship
in the French Room.
Prayer Breakfast Wednesday at 7:00
a.m.
Bible Study Wednesday at 4:00 p.m.
Theology Discussion Group Thurs-
day at 7:00 p.m.
* * *
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST
CHURCH!; SBC
2580 Packard Road
971-077:1
Michael Clingenpeel, Ph.D., Pastor
Sunday-9:45, Sunday School; 11:00.
Morning Worship.
Student Transportation call 662-6253
or 764-5240.
6:00 p.m.-Student supper; 7 p.m.-
Worship. -
Wednesday, 6 p.m.-Dinner and
Church family activities.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
502 E. Huron St. (between State &
Division)-663-9376
Dr. Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service-Ser-
mon: "Religious Reformation and
World Renewal." Observance of The
Lord's Supper.
11:00 a.m.-College Class-led by Dr.
Nadean, Bishop.
5:30 p.m.-Sunday Family Night Sup-'
pers, Fellowship Hall. Students Wel-
come As Our Guests.
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m.-Campus
Disc:ussion Group-led by Margi
Stuber, M.D., in the Campus Center
Lounge.

Cohen may raise Kennedy

(Continued from Page 1)
members of the spontaneous "draft
Kennedy" movements already formed.
, The group included former second
district Congressman Weston Vivian,
former second district Democratic
Party Chairman George Sallade, for-
mer city chairman Victor Adamo, and
Elizabeth Davenport, assistant to
University Vice-President Henry John-
son.
FAYE SAID the group primarily
discussed the laws regarding fund-
raising for presidential candidates.
Apparently because of federal elec-
tion campaign laws, it is to Kennedy's
advantage to authorize a single in-
dividual in each state to keep track of
fund-raising for him.
Federal law limits the amount of
money a candidate can spend in each
state before that state's primary. To
keep funds raised by unauthorized
"draft Kennedy" movements from
being counted against that limit, the
Senator has formally disavowed the
fund-raising efforts of these groups
nationwide.
A KENNEDY spokeswoman reached
last night in Washington declined to
comment on Cohen's selection and

referred questions to Kennedy's press
secretary who was on the road with the
Senator yesterday.
Several unofficial "draft Kennedy"
movements currently exist in Michigan
and now are awaiting notification from
the national committee in Washington
allowing them to join an official Ken-
nedy organization in the state.
Bernard Ryan, a long-time worker
for the Democratic party in Michigan
who heads an unofficial statewide
group headquarted in Detroit,
acknowledged yesterday that Cohen
"had been contacted by Kennedy to
raise matching (federal campaign)
funds."
RYAN'S "DRAFT Kennedy"
movement has had to be "very careful"
not to communicate with the national
Kennedy committee, in Washington,
Ryan said. That communication could
cause the draft Oovement's funds to be
counted against the candidate's spen-
ding limit in Michigan, he said.
State and local Democratic leaders
indicated there is extensive support for
Kennedy's candidacy in the state.
A group of elected state officials,
headed by Attorney General Frank

Kelley, announced its support for Ken-
nedy in mid-September.
SEVERAL SUPPORTERS cited
Kennedy's plan for national health in-
surance, his record as a legislator, and
his liberal image as reasons for backing
the 47-year-old senator.
But some backers say intangible
qualities draw many to Kennedy's side.

rCohen.e
refused to comment

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

4 DIE IN PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL:
Food poisoning claims patients

in the 27th chapter of the Book of Acts there Is the account
of the Apostle Paul's trip to Italy and Rome to appear before
Caesar. He is now a prisoner among other prisoners, In the
hands of a Roman Centurion. After they had endured a
terrible storm for two or more weeks the ship was wrecked
and dashed to pieces by the violence of the waves. All the
cargo and valuables on board were lost, excepting the
human cargo of 276 souls. Every one of these escaped
without Injury. Their fearful experiences and loss might have
'been avoided had they taken heed to Paul's warning.
After sailing had been slow and dangerous for many days
the ship put in at a port called Fair Havens on the island of
Crete, to consider the advisability of stopping for a season.
"PAUL ADMONISHED THEM, AND SAID UNTO THEM,
SIRS, I PERCEIVE THE VOYAGE WILL BE WITH MUCH
HURT AND DAMAGE, NOT ONLY TO THE LADING AND
t QUI 911 T Al % WTn IMIR I IVFS@ NEVETHELESS THE

Into the "Jaws of death," and but for the presence of Paul and
God's purpose for him to preach at Rome, it appears all
human life on board would have perished with the ship and
its cargo.
In this 27th chapter of Acts you will find that after it was too
late to save anything except the life in their own skins, the
Centurion, the Master and Owner of the ship, and the
Soldiers, learned to take heed and obey the warnings of The
Apostle. When they rejected his advice about remaining at
Crete, for a long time Paul kept quiet. But after being
tempest-tossed for about a couple of weeks and all hope was
given up of 'being saved, Paul speaks again: "FOR THERE
STOOD BY ME THIS NIGHT THE ANGEL OF GOD, WHOSE
I AM, AND WHOM I SERVE, SAYING, FEAR NOT PAUL;
THOU MUST BE BROUGHT BEFORE CAESAR; AND LO,
GOD HATH GIVEN THEE ALL THEM THAT SAIL WITH
THEE. WHEREFORE, SIRS, BE OF GOOD CHEER: FOR I

MARLBORO, N.J. (AP) - Four
elderly patients aparently died of food
poisoning and 127 others got sick after
eating chicken at Marlboro Psychiatric
Hospital, state officials said yesterday.
The four died Monday and Tuesday,
said Ann Burns, a spokeswoman for the
state Department of Human Services,
which operates the 1,250-bed facility in
Monmouth County.
THE 127 OTHERS suffered severe
diarrhea after Sunday's evening meal

THE 127 PATIENTS have recovered,
and no new cases were reported at the
hospital, she said.
The chicken was supplied to the
hospital by the state distribution center
in Ewing, which provides food to
various state institutions, she said.
"The Board of Health hasn't pinpoin-
ted whether faulty food handling
techniques were involved, so we don't
know if there was any breakdown in
procedures. But the kitchen is working

County medical examiner. But he said
more tests were needed to determine
whether contaminated food actually
contributed to the death.
Becker said the cause of death was
listed as pulmonary edema and
congesion and aspiration of gastric con-
tents. The aspiration of gasstric conten-
ts indicates vomiting, which could have
been caused by food poisioning, he said.
"EVERYONE IS very upset about
this tragedy and the patients are very

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