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November 02, 1979 - Image 13

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-11-02

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 2, 1979-Page 13
SEASON A NIGHTMARE
gers battle Michigan

By MICHAEL LIEBERMAN,
As the football season winds on down,
and the magical month of November
comes upon us, many questions still
remain unanswered. Foremost of all
these questions of course, is who's
going to win the Big Ten title and the
trip to the Rose Bowl?
At this time it's too early to tell, but
one thing is for certain, Wisconsin
definitely won't be the champ.
THE BADGERS, a preseason dark-
horse possibility, have been stuck in a
season long struggle to gain respec--
tability. The team has been decimated
by injuries to several key players, for-
cing Coach Dave McClain to patch
together a skeleton team.
No less than six starting players, in-
cluding two quarterbacaks, have
missed a significant portion of the
season. At least ten freshmen and
sophomores have been pressed into
starting roles at some time this year.
To further the team's woes, tragedy
struck, as two Badger players lost their
lives this summer in unrelated inciden-
ts. Wayne Souza, a starter, and the
team's third leading pass receiver last
year, drowned and Jay Seiler, a fresh-
man recruit, died after being severely
injured during a spring practice

session.
PERHAPS IT IS attributable to the
old "sophomore jinx" or perhaps it's
some other unknown fate, but McClain,
in his second year at the university, has
been operating with a black cloud
hanging over his head. First Mike
Kalasmiki, a senior quarterback with a
great deal of talent was sidelined with a
broken thumb.
No sooner did his replacement,
sophomgre John Josten, enter the
lineup when he too was injured. This
left Steve Parish, a junior transfer
student from Kansas State to take over
at the helm. So far Parish has done a
commendable job, completing 57 per-
cent of his passes and leading the team
in total offense with 507 yards.
Despite the adversity facing the team
this season, there are some bright
spots. After falling to Iowa 24-13 last
week, Coach McClain complimented
his troups for their aggressive and
courageous performance.
"WE PLAYED A lot of good football
against Iowa, except for about five
plays," McClain said. "If you take
those four or five plays out of the game,
you'd probably find we played a better
game than Iowa.
"We've played hard, we've played
well physically, we've played darn.

C7

well. If we can eliminate our mistakes
we can win some football games." -
In his offensive backfield, McClain is
happy with the play of his sophomore
fullback Dave Mohapp. Mohapp ob-
tained his position when former
fullback Tom Stauss was moved to
tailback. Mohapp's response was to
become the Badgers' leading ground
gainer this year with 427 yards on 77
carries.
"Right now Dave is one of the best
fullbacks in the Big Ten. He runs well
and blocks like a demon. He's much
improved over his play last year," said
McClain.
An interesting statistic is that
Mohapp has been tackled for a loss only
one time in his last 111 carries.
ON THE DEFENSIVE side of the
coin, the Badgers sport a legitimate all
Big Ten and possible All American
candiate in strong side linebacker Dave
Ahrens. Ahrens, a junior, has been a
starter in all three of his years at
Wisconsin. Another big Badger name is
Tom Schremp, a 6-4, 255 lb. defensive
right tackle. He is tied with Ahrens for
the team leadership in tackles for
losses (5), and has a knack for forcing
other teams into mistakes.
The Badger followers can be further

Michigan tean since 1965. Last year, in
McClain's first confrontation with the
Wolverines, he was shut out by a score
of 42-0.
If the Badgers were to beat the
Wolverines Saturday, it would be the
highlight of their dismal season. Com-
bined with their win against MSU, it
would be the first time a Wisconsin
team beat both Michigan teams in the
same season.

:

GR L _~ADUAT I

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ENGI NEERS

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22:55 Esm2amen S ..*....................lingag onsoled with theknwdg tht
- ..:.. ...............:: :::::::::::::::::::::::......::::::>::.:.:::.::::-::.::::: :::::::..*:::.."..:::.::_::::::.::..:::.::.. . . . . . . .c::::::::.:know ledgeit t e nothat ha
several of their wounded warriors will
be ready to return to action this Satur-
day.
Vaughn Thomas, a free safety, and
Tom Braker, a flanker, hope to be able
to play. The fans can also anticipate
seeing quarterback Kalasmiki play
some depending on the progress of his
thumb. He played a little last week, but
since his thumb was too sore to handle a
center snap, the Badgers employed the
shotgun offense. According to McClain,
f' ,l 1 ~"Kalasmiki's playing time depends on
if he can take the snap from center this
Y week."
The Badgers enter the game with a 2-
6 overall record and a 1-4 conference
record. They have not beaten a
u "
WISCONSIN QUARTERBACK,
senior Mike Kalasmiki, shown
here setting up to pass against
Oregon, is a possible starter
against Michigan this Saturday.
Kalasmiki is still recovering
from a thumb injury suffered
earlier this season.
.............is. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BLUE ICERS CHALLENGE CHAMPS
Gophers bring thinranks to Yost

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Arrange through your placement
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By ELISA FRYE
What do you do when you're the coach
of a championship hockey team that's
been depleted by defections to the
Olympic ranks? Fortunately for
Michigan coach Dan Farrell, this is not
his situation, but it is the predicament
in which this weekend's rival, Min-
nesota acting coach Brad Buetow, finds
himself.
Buetow has taken over last -year's
NCAA champs while head coach Herb
Brooks is away at the Olympics with
the nucleus of the Gophers center line:
Neal Broten, Steve Christoff, Rob Mc-
Clanhan, and Eric Strobel. In addition,
there was the expected loss of five
seniors from last year's team.
Before the start of the season, Buetow
commented that he planned to cope
with the loss of goal production by
playing a more conservative style of
hockey. "We won't be as goal minded,"
he said. Yet last weekend saw the
Gophers sweep Michigan State, 9-8 and
11-5. But while Minnesota was com-
piling 20 goals it was allowing the Spar-
tans to score 13.
Buetow said of the series with the
Spartans: "I can't really be much less
than happy about winning our opening
series, but at the same time I'm far
from pleased with the defensive play of
everyone, particularly in our own end."
Farrell was a little surprised at the
Gophers' tallies. "I didn't think they
could score as well as they did," he
said. "Maybe the scores are indicative
of their firepower."

This weekend's games are perhaps a
bit more critical for the Gophers than
for the Wolverines. First, it is only the
second series Minnesota has played,
while the Michigan icers have two un-
der their belts. Secondly, and more im-
portantly, it is a road series, and
Buetow will be bringing a relatively
inexperienced team with him.
"I'm very concerned about this series
for severalreasons," he said. "It's
always critical when new people first
go on the road. And we will be taking
plenty of new people."
Buetow continued, "How they handle
their concentration and poise, and can
they maintain whatever momentum we
gained from last weekend are vital fac-
tors. It's seldom easy to go on the
road."
Farrell was more relaxed about
taking on the Gophers, who beat
Michigan four times last year. "It's
another weekend, another test," he

commented. But, he added with a
flicker of anticipation, "I don't think
we've been tested yet. We haven't been
in a tight game yet.
"A tight game increses mental con-
centration and you can find out better
what people are capable of," Farrell
explained.
Having finished at the bottom of the
WCHA last year, Michigan has nothing
to lose in this series with last year's
champs. But the Gophers may find out
what it's like to work their way up from
the bottom rung.
BLUE LINES: Left wing Gordie
Hampson still has a broken hand and
will not see action this weekend . . .
Freshman goalie Paul Fricker seems to
have recovered from the flu, which for-
ced him out of last Friday night's game,
and will be able to play-if Farrell
decides he'll start the rookie.
Tonight's and Saturday night's
games start at 7:30 at Yost Arena.

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Student Newspaper at The University of Michigan
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