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October 30, 1979 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-30

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Page 10- -Tuesday, October 30, 1979-The Michigan Daily

BO'S WORDS CARRY WEIGHT

There was a young man from Flint,
An ad for the League saw in print,
The journey he madte
Was doubly repaid;
To his friends he has passed on the hint.
P.P.
The ichin

CAFETERIA HOURS;
11:30-1:15
5:00-7:15
SNACK BAR
7:15-4:00

Badger threat no laughing matter

Next to Hill Auditorium
Located in the heart ot the campus.
it is the heart of the campus.

r
G
1
t
c

Send your League Limerick to:
Manager, Michigan League
227 South Ingalls
You will receive 2 free dinner
tickets if your limerick is used in
one of our ads.

By GEOFF LARCOM
When Bo Schembechler launched into
the customary praises and warnings at
yesterday's weekly press luncheon,
regarding this weekend's Big Ten op-
ponent, Wisconsin, a funny thing hap-
pened.
Everyone listened.
It appears that the Saturday scare
Indiana threw the Wolverines' way has
lent some credence to the Monday
Schembechler ritual. For when Bo, per
usual, said, "Wisconsin has the tools to
beat Michigan," a quick glance around
the luncheon room at Weber's revealed
no smirks, no yuk-yuk whispers being
exchanged between the media present.
Not when it took a desperation heave
by John Wangler with six seconds left to
pull the Wolverines out of the soup and
preserve Michigan's lofty postseason
hopes. Not when Michigan's defense
performed as mere mistake-prone mor-
tals against the Hoosiers. And
especially, when Michigan's kicking
game remains as accurate as a
Michigan weather report.
"I hope the effect on us after Indiana
is a positive one," said Schembechler,
referring to the emotional.- Blue vic-
tory. "But that doesn't offset the fact
that we didn't play a good defensive
game. They're (the defense) still
feeling down.
"'The breakdowns pn defense were
not unlike the Michigan State game a
year ago. We didn't back up well on
pass coverage. .. It took the first bad
game the defense has played this
year."
Indeed, a check of Michigan's weekly
football press release indicated "none
selected" under the defensive cham-
pion of the week heading. "Tells you

something, doesn't it?," Schembechler
said.
While the Wolverine defense finds it-
self in the unfamiliar position of having
to redeem itself this week, the offensive
situation has changed as well. John

That means Rich Hewlett, the fresh-
man from Plymouth Salem, will step
into the backup slot, as Wangler makes
his first start of the season. Hewlett can
expect an active week in practice, his
third string status having not permitted
much in-depth work thus far.
"When you have a full team practice,
you run only the.first and second string
quarterbacks, that's all you have time
for. Hewlett will take 250-300 snaps this
week to get ready," Bo said.
Wangler meanwhile, having moved
Michigan 78 yards in 55 seconds against
Indiana in that crazy final drive,
definitely appears ready, as does the
newest member of productive fumble
club-Lawrence Reid.
The Michigan fullback's time-saving
ploy of fumbling, nay, tossing the ball

out of bounds on the second to last play
of the game was legal-sort of.
"If he threw the ball out deliberately,
it was illegal. In the officials judgment
though, it was legal," Schembechler
smiled. "But the fact he threw the balf
out didn't matter. Wanglertwas read:
to call time out right when the play en-'
ded."
WOLVERINE TALES: Ben,
Needham will be back in the lineup this
Saturday, having not suited up for the.
Indiana win due to a one game suspen-#
sion for curfew violation . Stanley;
Edwards resumed practice yesterday,
although Butch Woolfolk will start at
tailback this Saturday ... and wolfman
Stu Harris is still out with a shoulder ir-
jury.

ECHNOLOGY AND PESSIMISM

WEDNESDAY
31 October
MEL-VIN KRANZBERG
"TECHNOLOGY:'
THE HALF-FULL
CUP,
4 k00-5A30 PM h '
Rachami AmpIh1t'eatre

THURSDAY
1 November

r

B.J. Dickey

RICHARD FALK
"TECHNOLOGY
AND POLITICS:
SHIFTING BALANCES"
400-5:30 PM
Racham Amphtheatre

Wangler is, for now, first string, quar-
terback.
"B.J. Dickey has a sore left shoulder.
It's jammed and there's some
elevation," .Schembechler said of
Dickey's Indiana injury. "He broke
loose on the option and two guys hit him
right in front of our bench and he came
down on his shoulder. My honest
opinion is he's not gonna be ready this
week." %

SAMUEL FLORMAN
"TECHNOLOGY
AND THE
TRAGIC VIEW"
800-9 30 PM
Rackhnam Amphtheatre

LEO MARX
"AMERICAN
LITERARY CULTURE
AND THE
PESSIMISTIC VIEW
OF TECHNOLOGY"
800-9.30 PM
Rackr'am Amptheatre

Department of Humanities Lectures on Current Issues
College of Engineering / The University of Michigan

Callam stands out as
Clubbers beat Lakers

By SCOTT M. LEWIS
Michigan's decisive football victory over Michigan State must have
sent other Spartan teams quaking with fear at the mention of "MEESH-
igan." At least it seemed that way last weekend, as two MSU squads backed
out of their scheduled contests with the Wolverines.
The Spartan lacrosse and rowing teams decided they were not ready to
tangle with their Blue foes. The rowers' race against Michigan State was
reset for Sunday at East Lansing, with 16 women and 32 men competing for
Michigan. The lacrosse team, however, had its season come to a premature
end, thanks to the Spartans' reluctance to play.
"MSU called us up at noon, three hours before the game," related Bobby
Fleischman, who is expected to be named captain next spring. "They said
they had midterms, but we all have midterms, and their team has 45 guys.
"(Their action) might have something to do with the embarrassment
they suffered the week before (when Michigan beat MSU, 13-4, in East Lan-
sing). ILcan't wait till we play them in the spring. We usually hold the score -
down when we get ahead against them, but not anymore," Fleischman
added.
SOCCER
The graduate club, 1-5, has.a score to settle Saturday at 11 a.m. as it
hosts Lawrence Tech at Elbel Field. The squad from Southfield defeated an
injury-depleted Blue unit, 5-2, on October 20.
Goalie Jim Prendergast, injured in the grad-undergrad match nearly
two weeks ago, will see action Saturday.
A scrimmage between the grads and a-team of Algerian students was
canceled last Saturday
The undergraduate club, meanwhile, pushed its record to 8-1-1 Wed-
nesday with a comeback 2-1 win over host Eastern Michigan.
After a scoreless first half, EMU tallied ten minutes into the second
session. Charlie Corbett knotted the contest five minutes later by drilling a.
rebound into the Huron net. Bob Zak, voted Player of the Game by his
teammates, had an assist.
Michigan scored the game-winner when Ihor Fedorowycz'fed Dave Rit-
chie, who now leads the team with five goals.
The undergrads host Spring Arbor College, 10-4, at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday
on the Tartan Turf. Spring Arbor is recognized as a Division III power, once
finishing third nationally in the divisional tournament.
RUGBY.
Idle last weekend, Michigan, 2-3-1, returns to action Saturday morning,
as it entertains the Cincinnati Rugby Club at Elbel in a 2 p.m. affair. ;<<
SAILING
Michigan qualified for this year's prestigious Sugar Bowl Regatta in
New Orleans by finishing second out of 15 teams last weekend in the Ohio
State Halloween Regatta. Led by freshmen Doug Weber and Karl Neu-
mann, Meg Morrison and team captain John Dohan, the Blue sailors collec-
ted 92 points, behind Miami (0.)'s 90.
The Buckeye event was the final qualifier in a series of three to deter-
mine the top Midwest representative to the Sugar Bowl, held during winter
vacation.

IASK THEM WHYI

Ask a Peace Corps volunteer why he teaches business
marketing techniques to vegetable farmers in Costa
Rica. Ask a VISTA volunteer why she organizes the
rural poor in Arkansas to set-up food co-ops. They'll
probably say they want to help people, want to use
their skills, be involved in social change, maybe travel,
learn a new language or experience another culture.
Ask them:
PLACEMENT CENTER STUDENT ACTIVITIES BLDG.
OCT. 30 - NOV. 1

By BOB EMORY
Only 45 'seconds left in the game, and
Mary Callam had scored but three
goals, leaving her with 24 for the'
season, still one short of tying the single
season scoring record.
But then the ball came out onto her
stick at the top of the scoring circle in
front of the Grand Valley net, and she
let go a hard shot that looked like it
would miss the cage altogether. At the
last second, however, the ball deflected-
off a Grand Valley defender and
trickled through for a goal. And in that
manner, Callam had tied the record.
IT WAS HER fourth goal of the game
and coupled with her assist on Mary
Hibbard's second half score, Callam
pretty much spelled the difference in
the Wolverines' 5-1 victory over the
Lakers.
Despite her game-winning efforts,
which have become somewhat com-
monplace over the years (she broke the
record for career goals earlier this
LSATAmi
Review Seminars.
15 student average class size
Team teaching technique
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year), Callam refused to take all the
credit.
"Well, this is a team game," she em-
phasized. "You always give credit to
the people who score the goals but you
never give credit to the halfbacks and
defense; without them, nobody could
score."
INDEED. FRESLIWOMAN Marty
Maugh, the team's second leading
scorer, had set up Callam's second goal
beautifully. She had reached way out to
stop the ball from rolling out of bounds
at the side of the Laker net, then faked
past one defender and centered a pass
that went to Callam's stick like a
magnet. From there, Callam's shot into
the net was elementary.
And Hibbard, the strong, aggressive
halfback, had laid a pass right on
Callam's stick for another easy goal
just a few minutes later.
But the fact remains that Callam
scored four goals, the fourth time this
year she has scored at least three times
in one game. Perhaps her sister,
Alexandra, said it best at the end of the
game. After Mary scored her fourth
goal, Alexandra, who had come out
early to rest her sore ankles, screamed
out jokingly, "You pig! Give someone
else a chance." '
CLUBBER NOTES: Four seniors -
Jean McCarthy, Laura Pieri, Hibbard
and Mary Callam - played their last
game at Ferry Field yesterday . . . The
Wolverines wrap up their regular
season this afternoon with a game
against Albion on the road. . . If they
win, they will carry a 13-7-1 record into
the state tournament next week at
Marquette.

Grildde Picks

I9RPS

hT~aI

Give those guys in Rumsey House a
saliva test! First, they go out and clean
up on everyone and everything in the
intramural leagues. Then they emerge
as champion of the heralded ice cream
cone throwing contest. And now, they
have achieved the ultimate victory, as
Rumseyite Kent Walley cleaned up on
his fellow Gridde contestants by
picking 18 of 20 games correctly to win
a small, one-item Pizza Bob's pizza.
Now, we're down to four Griddeful
weeks left in the season. That includes
the special40game package we're of-
fering for the games of November 24
and December 1. So now is the time for
all good men and women to come to the
aid of their stomachs (and egos). Get
your picks in by midnight Friday, and
you, too, may be saying "Que pasta".

1. Wisconsin at MICHIGAN
score)
2. Ohio St. at Illinois
3. Michigan St. at Northwestern
4. Purdue at Iowa
5. Minnesota at Indiana
6. Wake Forest at Clemson
7. Duke at Georgia Tech
8. N. C. State at S. Carolina
9. N. Carolina at Maryland
10. Colorado at Iowa St.
11. Arizona St. at Stanford
12. Washington at California
13. Texas Tech at Texas
14. Central Michigan at Toledo
15. Yale at Cornell
16. Eastern Michigan at Ball St.
17. Army at Air Force
18. Navy at Notre Dame
19. Montana at Montana St.
20. DAILY LIBELS at KCIA

(pick

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IS GOAL JUST ANOTHER
4 LETTER WORD TO YOUI
ORGANIZATION?
DO YOU FEEL LIKE YOU
RE-INVENT THE WHEEL
EVERY YEAR?
Wouldn't it be nice
to know where you
are going and how
you are going to
get there?

i
R
---_.._
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...,,..

iI

THEN YOUR OBJECTIVE for this week is to attend
the workshop on ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOP-
MENT: A Model for Effective Planning ...
WHERE: The KUENZEL ROOM, Michigan Union
WHEN: from 11:30-1:30, October 30th

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