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October 30, 1979 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6-Tuesday, October 30, 1979-The Michigan Daily

I

Boston TV cancels
'racially violent' show

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THE UNIVERSA oe
S
EF iCice AnnounCes The 1979-80
Season Subscriptions e
c~eON SA LE NOW a
PTP Ticket Office- S
The Michigan League 0
Mon.-Fri. 10-1 and 2-5 pm
at PowerVenter Phone: 764-0450
i'ustasDance Conceri
Featuring; Britten's "CEREMONY OF CAROLS"
Stravinsky's "RENARD".
)ecember 7-9 Fr& Sat at 8xn-Sm. at 3pm
Featured: MEMBERS OF THE ANN ARBOR CANTATA SINGERS
Choreographed by ELIZABETH WEIL BERGMANN
lanuary 26 at 3pm& 8pm

BOSTON (AP) - Clergymen, public
officials and a professional football
team all announced plans yesterday to
try to calm the explosive racial climate
that prompted a Boston blackout of a
prime-time network television show.
WBZ-TV, at the urging of both black
and white community leaders, decided
against showing the two-part NBC
drama "Freedom Road," last night and
tonight, starring former heavyweight
boxing champion Muhammad Ali.
CARDINAL Humberto Medeiros,
joined by other religious leaders, told a
news conference of plans for a
"covenant" of racial harmony that
would be launched at an ecumenical
convocation Nov. 19 on Boston Com-
mon. After the service, Medeiros said,
every Bostonian would be urged to sign
the "covenant of justice, equity and
harmony.'
The involvement of Medeiros,
spiritual leader of the Boston Catholic
Archdiocese, is considered significant,
since approximately 75 per cent of the
city's population of 640,000 are
Catholics.
Included in the covenant is a call for
the rejection of "any and all special in-
terest groups and leaderships that ser-
ve only to deepen our divisions and en-
trench us, angered, into separate cam-
Ps .

management of the New England
Patriots and officials of the
Massachusetts Bay Transportation
Authority in the attempt to defuse the
city's tense atmosphere.
The Patriots asked their National
Football League players to volunteer to
meet with students in the city's racially
tense schools.
The transportation authority said
that, effective yesterday through Dec.
31, it would add buses to school transit
routes and increase security to prevent
skirmishes between black and white
students.
A STATEMENT from WBZ said the
Boston station's decision to cancel the
program, set in the Reconstruction
South, was based on "unusually
graphic incidents of racial violence
depicted, particularly violence against
children."
"The- film contained inflammatory
language and there were racial
stereotypes in it," said program direc-
tor Dick Kurlander of WBZ-TV, an NBC
affiliate owned by the Westinghouse
Broadcasting Co.
In New York, an NBC spokesman
said WBZ was the only affiliate to can-
cel the film. NBC had no further com-
ment.

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KRIS KRISTOFTERSON and Muhammad Ali, shown in their roles as,
respectively, a sharecropper and a former slave in the NBC made-for-TV
movie "Freedom load," won't be seen in Boston when the program airs
tonight. WBZ-TV, iBC's Boston affiliate, cancelled the movie because it
said, "The film migit heighten racial tensions in Boston."

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THE CLERGYMEN joined

the

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Carmina Burana
DANCE SOLOISTS: Christine Dakin (courtesy of Martha Graham Dance Co.),
Gay Delanghe, Willie Feuer, Susan Matheke and Gus Solomons Jr.
CHOREOGRAPHER: Elizabeth Weil Bermann-CONDUCTOR: Thomas Hilbish
March 13-16. Thu,FrL&Sat.at 8pm~Sun at 3pm
- U S -

Wayne workers to,*1w laid off

TEAC HERS

DETROIT (UPI)-Layoff notices
were on the way yesterday to more than
4,800 employees of the near penniless
Wayne County.
The layoffs are effective Nov. 12, but
the county hopes to immediately call
back about half the workers to maintain
vital services. A sizeable sum will have
to be found somewhere, however, to
allow those recalls.
ORIGINALLY, OFFICIALS of the
nation's third largest county had hoped
to pay employees called back to work
with promissory notes. A circuit court
judge vetoed that plan last Friday.

County officials were hopeful of state
aid, although Gov. William G. Milliken
has vowed not to bail out the county
unless steps are taken to reform its
muddled, overlapping governmental
structure.
A relief package totaling nearly $11
million is pending in the legislature.
SPEAKING FOR MILLIKEN, who
was returning from a 10-day visit to
China, Lt. Gov. James H. Brickley said
he believes the governor will approve
the aid if a charter commission is for-
med to reorganize county government

and a legal conflict is resolvel to per-
mit a county executive form I gover-
nment..
"Obviously, if the legislatures able
to pass those two bills . .. it will often
our, problems considerably,"said
County Commission Chairman Ricard
Manning.
"There will still be some layoffs. tur
plan is to use those dollars ... for essti-
tial services."
THE COUNTY, WHICH has failed tc
balance its books for four years, faces a
$19.3 million deficit this year.

The county already twice has failed
to meet its payroll. About 3,100 em-
'ployees who were not paid two weeks
ago got their checks last Friday, while
another 2,600 went payless.
Ironically, while there is not enough
money to pay current county workers,
retirees have nothing to fear from the
county's financial crisis.
Alfred Bricker, executive secretary
of the county retirement system, said
there is about $325 million imi the pen-
sionefund.

"There is enough here to pay the
retirees forever," he said.

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HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS ADVISED TO APPLY EAILY

Aid programs inance educatior

Ask a Peace Corps volunteer why she teaches
deaf education in Thailand...ask another volunteer
why he works as a teacher trainer in Kenya.
They'll probably say they want to help people,
want to use their skills, travel, learn a new language
arid experience another culture. Ask them:

By the Associated Press

For thousands of high school seniors,
the start of the school year means the
start of the search for acceptance by a
college or university. -For many
families, it also means the start of the
search for help to pay the bills.
The cost of a four-year education at a
private college or university already is
more than $22,000, according to figures
compiled by the College Board, and
tuition and fees are expected to keep
going up.

MILLIONS OF DOLLARS of public
and private money are available to help
students and their families, but it is im-
portant to plan ahead to get your share.
Ask colleges about financial aid when
you ask for application forms. Make a
note of deadlines and mark them on a
calendar. Do not wait until you areac-
cepted at a school to investigate
scholarships and other aid programs; it
may be too late by then.
The next step is finding out whether

f

PLACEMENT CENTER
OCT. 30 - NOV. 1

STUDENT ACTIVITIES BLDG.

PEACE

ENERGY
We can't aford
to waste it.
F 2 F R E 1. m2 1m ---.1 -m- ---
1 -1
1 2FEE2. COKES 1
1 With Purchaseof Any 1
1 - 1 Item or More Pizza1
1 (WITH THIS AD)1
1 OPEN SUN-THURS 11am-1am; FRI & SAT 11am-2am 1
1 Now Delivering to the N. Campus Area .
1 " 1
1BE LL'S GR EEK PIZZA
995-0232 I
700 Packard at State Street1
ALL
DINNERS
INCLUDE CHOICE
OF VEGETABLE, HOT
BREAD,GAND A TRIP TO
THE SALAD BAR. TWO LOW
PRICES, ELEVEN GREAT ENTREES.
INCLUDING TROUT, STUFFED SCH ROD,
BAY SCALLOPS AND A 9 OZ. SIRLOIN STEAK.
Johnny Come Early-]Mlmma

you qualify for help. Eligibility is
usually linked to family financial
status, but you should not make the
mistake of thinking that income alone
makes the difference. Financial status
depends on a lot of things: the number
of youngsters in school, for example;
assets, like a house; or special expen-
ses.
MOST SCHOOL AND scholarship
agencies rely on one of several stan-
dardized forms to decide eligibility.
These forms are published and
analyzed by testing services; you and
your family fill in the form and mail it
to the testing service which, in turn,
sends it to colleges you select.
The details of the forms vary, but
they generally are designed to deter-
mine how much a family can
reasonably be expected to contribute to
a student's education. Colleges com-
pare this amount to individual costs to
see whether a student needs help. You
may be eligible for aid at one school and
ineligible at another.
Among the most commonly used
forms are the Financial Aid
Form-FAF-issued by the College
Scholarship Service of the College En-
trance Examination Board and the
Family Financial Statement -
FFS - from the Student
Need Analysis Service of the American
College Testing Program.
THEY ARE generally available
from high school counselors; students
should pick them up late in the fall and,
should complete them as soon as
possible after Jan. 1. There is a
processing charge, plus a separate fee
for each school to which you want the
form sent.
The federal government has five

basiqaid programs, several of which
have een expanded recently. They
are: asic Educational Opportunity
Grants Supplemental Educational Op-
portuniy Grants, National Direct'
StudentLoans, College Work-Study,
and Guaarteed Student Loans. All but','
the Guarneed Student loans are tied, "
to financal need; starting this year,
guaranteed bans are available regar
dless of incone.
The broadst program is the one
providing bas? grants. The amount of
the grants varts from year to year; for
the current a'ademic year, grants
range from $50+, ,$1,600 depending on
eligibility.
FINANCIAL NIED is determined'
according to a co plicated formula,'
but, as a general tile, students from
families with incoms of up to $26,006'
can qualify for basicgrants: You have=
to re-apply for a basicgrant each year.
,All students who areligible for basic'-'
grants receive them The money is,
generally paid by theschool. You will
not be given the moneyintil you are ac-:',<
tually enrolled; the sool may issue
you a check for the granor may simply
credit the amount to youiaccount.
Guaranteed loans ar" granted by
banks, credit unions, ad other par-'
ticipating financial insttutions. You'",
pay no interest at all duing the four-
years you are in college aid for a brief'-
period after you graduate. Vhen you do'
begin to pay interest, it Aill be at a'
relatively low rate.
Undergraduates may borow up to.
$2,500 a year up to a maimum of
$7,500. It is up to you to find ai institution '
willing to lend you the moneyunder the',"
guaranteed loan program; nit all len-7
ders are willing.

- -

but incons*stent

4: 4
::V{

(Continued from Page5)
ween scenes to clean up and rearrange
props in preparation for Doris' and
George's next visit. She even provided
some saucy humor as she steals an

illicit sip of Doris and George's leftover
champagne. It is a small bit, but one-
which adds in extra spark-something
sorely needed by this production.

Stanley Kramer's 1903

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