100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 28, 1979 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Officials insist Park
slaying an accident

(Continued from Page 1)
in official circles spoke of a revolver,
normally a six-chambered handgun.
But Park was said to have been hit
twice. If each of the bodyguards was
felled with a single bullet, that's seven
rounds.
" How many people were at the din-
ner? Did anyone else fire shots? The
government did not say.
" Where did the killings take place?
" Was there any involvement by the
military? Nothing is being said of-
ficially, but political sources said Kim
was opposed to Park's increasingly
repressive measures which caused
riots last week in two major cities and
that he may have found support among
top-level army officers.
" Was it a disguised coup?
Meanwhile in Washington, U.S. of-
ficials have ruled out North Korean in-
volvement or a military coup as
reasons for Friday's bizarre killing, a
senior State Department official said.
The official said that Washington still
does not know exactly what happened

in Seoul, but the government's im-
mediate concern about a threat from
North Korea had been allayed.
"It was not a North Korean
operation," the official said, adding
that there was no evidence of North
Korea trying to capitalize on the uncer-
tainty in the south by any threatening
activity.
Similarly, there was no evidence that
the South Korean armed forces were at-
tempting a coup, the official said,
noting that the constitutional
prhcedures were followed after Park's
death.
Moreover, the military did not take
over full power under martial law
regulations when it could have done so.

ArPVPhoto
THE REV. Charles E. Coughlin gestures during an attack on the Roosevelt
administration it this 1936 photo. The "radio priest," famous for his
depression era national radio broadcasts, died at his home in Bloomfield
Hills yesterday.
FatherCoughindies,,
'30'S 'radio ,priest'

ENERGY.
We cant afford
to waste it.

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, October 28;,1979-Page 7
QuAW% on gunda9n
sleep in late
have a leisurely brunch
y
forget about the library
(at least till 2)
and relax with
{ b SmtjCbtgan ? t
Cuz we want you
It's not too late to subscribe
764-0558
Delivered to your door 6 days a week
Tues-Sun

-

Continued from Pae 1
Coughlin had the fiist of his many
confrontations with Roman Catholic
Church officials in mid-1936 when he
branded President Franklin Roosevelt
"the great liar and betrayer." He was
rebuked by his bishop and later
apologized.
Coughlin continued, however, to
mesmerize his listeners - and outrage
church and government officials -
with his program. His most controver-
sial broadcast came when he accused
two Jewish banking firms in New York
of helping finance the Russian

Revolution. It led to scathing charges
that he was anti-Semitic.
Only once did the controversy
swirling around Coughlin become
physical. A man attempted to attack
him during a 1936 rally in Detroit.
The crowd of 5,000 surged forward
amid cries of "kill him," but Coughlin
turned the crowd back by shouting,
"Let him alone. I love to talk to Com-
munists and Democrats."
Throughout his career, Coughlin
clashed repeatedly with Catholic
prelates and even the Vatican.

Blast hits embassy

NEW YORK (AP) - An explosion
rocked the area around the Cuban
Mission to 'the United Nations late
yesterday, blowing out windows near
the building in the Murray Hill area of
Manhattan. There were no immediate
reports of injuries.
A man saying he represented the an-
ti-Castro group, Omega Seven, called
The Associated Press soon after the
t blast to claim responsibility for the
blast. He said the explosives would

have been used to kill Cuban President
Fidel Castro during his visit to New
York two weeks ago, but security
surrounding his visit prevented the
assassination.
HE WENT ON to demand the release
of "all political prisoners from Com-
munist Cuba."
The origin of the explosion shortly
before 10 p.m. apparently was a bomb
that was placed near the mission, police
said.

300 S. Thayer 0 Next to the Bell Tower Hotel

...With buyer protection
that's very specific

FX-So
M BASIC SCIENCE
* MEAN, STANDARD DEVIATIONS,
FACTORIAL
" ENGINEERING NOTATION
. Xy X'/y, CUBE ROOT, X/Y EXCHANGE,
X/MEMORY EXCHANGE
* AND MORE....4000 HOURS OF
CONTINUOUS OPERATIQN

Fx -310
SAME FUNCTIONS AS THE FX-80.... BUT SLIMMER,
WITH 220 HOURS OF CONTINUOUS OPERATION
(1000 HOURS POSSIBLE ON DIFFERENT BATTERIES.)
PLUS.....HYPERBOLICS...FRACTIONS
BOTH List Prices $29.95
Cl s

We
Take
Care
of You
We are the only people
in A2 that cover the
year warranty period by
handling the servicing
and loaning you a cal-
culator to use while
yours is being repaired.
We pay shipping! We
offer a full 30 day over-
the-counter exchange
on all defective CASIO
Calculators for another
rlriji 1+~r of thecina

THE LATEST POCKET
SIZED PROGRAMMABLE
SCIENTIFIC
CALCULATOR FROM
CASIO.
0256 PROGRAM STEPS
022 MEMORY REGISTERS
*1O LEVELS OF PARENTHESES
*TRUE ALGEBRAIC LOGIC
051 BUILT IN FUNCTIONS
e PROGRAM AND MEMORY

t '!' r Y' <+++ ^ sin-' cos" tan"'
t/X X' X-Y M 1715--l M in MR
UNION 1 0 M ,
Ell E. n F JA (fn-t

I

I

_._. _.._ - - 1

I.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan