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October 25, 1979 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-25

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 25, 1979-Page 7

Ricky plays loud but not clear

By MARION PAAR
yIn the lovely. Michigan Theater,
surrounded by ornate wallpaper and
lavish scrollwork, Rick Nelson, son of
Ozzie and Harriet, came bounding out
to play a few tunes.
flis sparse though enthusiastic
audience included everyone from
youngsters to grandparents, a tribute to,
the broad-ranging attraction of a young
man who was once a child television
star and is now a rather middling suc-
cess as a musician. .
THE SONGS offered up by the boyish
Nelson were mostly basic early rock
and roll. In a scene straight from The
Buddy Holly Story, performers tuned
up on stage while stage hands clapped
and joked with the musicians: It-looked
raw and unpolished, and created the
distinct impression that Nelson and his
Stone Canyon band did not take
Tuesday night's engagement seriously.
As if to make up for this lack of ear-
nestness, the band cranked up the am-
plifiers and assaulted the crowd with
noise, noise, noise. Instruments over-
Ohelmed melodies, completely buried
lyrics, and one's ears took so long
recovering from the musical onslaught
that a quiet moment between songs was
more a godsend than a pause in per-
formance.
A GOOD EXAMPLE of this was the
destruction of "Honky Tonk Woman"
after a flashy and rhythmic piano in-
troduction. The zealous and direc-

no fresh arrangement or new direction
and are nothing hu memories.
"Dream Lover," Nelson's newest, is
actually a remake of an old song done
nearly in its original form.
THE WARM-UP act was comedian
Fred Smoot, who has written for
George Carlin and Jonathan Winters.
He is a man of sounds, and at one point
created the solar system through
various noises.
Mr. Smoot, however, laughs at his
own jokes. This implied that the
audience did not know when to laugh.
They most certainly did.

Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri 6:30, 8:20, 10:10-
Adults $2.50 tit 7:00 (or capacity)
Wed 12:50, 2:40, 4:30,
6:30, 8:20, 10:10
Adults $1.50 til 1:30 (or capacity)

Arthur Penn's

1967

'BONNIE AND CLYDE
A sensationally popular film Qf the 60's that produced cries of indignation ever
its portrayal of sex and violence. The ballad of the ruthlessly amoral but
incredibly virginal Clyde Barrow played by the lovable Warren Beatty. He picks
uo Bonnie (the allurinq Fave Dunawav) in a areasv cafe and teaches her how te%
rob banks. With GENE WILDER, ESTELLE PARSONS, MICHAEL J. POLLARD
and GENE WILDER. An untorgettably brutal but poetic ending. In color. Still
Penn's best work.
Fri: THE PHILADELPHIA STORY

See little Ricky play the guitar at the Michigan Theatre. See little Ricky sing. Play, Ricky, play. Wow
that's loud. Could you turn it down now please?

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

tionless band destroyed all hint of
musicality in the song, but the proof
was there: Given the chance and some
relative quiet, Nelson's music might
have been enjoyable rather than pain-
ful.
Along with wretchedly excessive

noise, the Nelson "image" served to
compound the monotony of the evening.
The routine of the hard driving, sweaty
song culminating in a pose with raised
guitar or fist, then a drop into a deep
bow simply cloyed. The overtones of
Saturday Night Fever developed by at-
tire and postures are a curious contrast

to the teenage heartthrob Ricky who
gee-whizzed his way into the national
heart lo so many years ago.
Indeed, Nelson tries to fight the
images from the past. In "Garden Par-
ty" he asserts "if memories were all I
sang, I'd rather drive a truck." The fact
is that most of the songs he plays have

CINEMAIj
PRESENTS
IN PERSON,
MOLLY HASKELL
Over the last decade, the critical role of women in film has increased
significantly. This evening, Cinema II is proud to present MOLLY
HASKELL, widely published film reviewer, author of FROM REVERENCE
TO RAPE, and the foremost critic of women an film in the country. Ms.
Haskell will speak on the changing roles and treatment of women on
film.

THREE-MEMBER STAFF HANDLES COMPLAINTS
City enforces anti-discrimination

A Continued from Page 1)
'Human Rights staff from four to three,
but at the same time it reduced the Per-
sonnel staff from seven to three. As a
result, Treadway said, one of two
iuman Rights investigators must
spend half his time in Personnel mat-
ters, as does the secretary attached to
liuman Rights.
Chauncey explained that the old
Human Rights department would test
for discrimination in rental housing by
sending a black couple to rent housing
without identifying themselves as
Human Rights investigators. But stff
a cuts have eliminated that program, he
'said.
Treadway said the division now con-
centrates on reacting to specific com-
plaints brought by city residents,
-rather than attacking the overall
problems of discrimination in housing,
employment and public buildings and
services,
'THE EXTENT of such discrimina-
tion in the city is unclear. Chauncey ex-
plained that the largest number of.
rcomplaints, 59 per cent, the department
-handles are charges of employment-
discrimination, with housing complain-
ts comprising 30 per cent. The depar-'
tment handles about 100 complaints a-
E Statewide, housing discrimination
complaints make up only three per cent
bf the cases brought. While the figures
are not proof, they suggest than Ann
Arbor landlords, operating in a seller's
market, discriminate more than lan-
dlors do statewide,
The division's approach to housing
and employment discrimination is to
secure housing or employment for the
victim through negotiation rather than
to punish the offender.
TREADWAY ALSO explains that the
department's tactics are in accordance
with reality: there are no magical
solutions to discrimination.
"We can't eradicate (discrimina-
tion), what we do is help those who are
damaged by it," he said.
'hat's because it is difficult to prove
discrimination, and the maximum fine
for someone found guilty of a violation
is only $500. The money goes to the city,
not the victim.
DESPITE THE magnitude of the
problem, City Council members who
approve all budget decisions made by
the city's administration - appear

uninterested in increasing funds for
Human Rights.
"I find no indication that we need a
bigger Human Rights department or
that they are not doing their job,"
declared David Fisher (R-Fourth
Ward).

has requested an evaluation of the
department's efficiency from Tread-
way, who took over in June. And while
Belcher said increased funding and
staff for the division is under con-
sideration, he predicted Council would
be skeptical of more funding because of

The Ir(Iinlatle d(oes
not1 5(11 1that1 ie aregoilig
to cre ale fa gardIen o f
li,,,ifs. ...
-Robe'rt Tread ceii.
I'e rsiopi tel/ilui (10
directo()r

want to know what they're going to get"
before they approve additional funding
for Personnel/Human Rights.
DEMOCRATIC council member Ken
Latta (D-First Ward) criticized the
mayor and administration for insuf-
ficieht leadership in Human Rights.
Latta said that, above all, the depar-
tment should "aggressively" pursue
housing discrimination complaints, but
he said he was satisfied with the per-
formance of the Human Rights
'division. "They're doing all they can
with the funding they've got," Latta
said.
Tomorrow: Enforcing affirmative
action in the private sector.
Testimonv taken by the Warren
('onmission about J. F. Kennedy's
,assassination was released to the public
in 1974
ELTON JOHN'S
GREATEST HITS VOLUME 11

L Rackham Amphitheatre

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MANN THEATRES
VILLAGE4
M~375 N. MAPLE
769-1300

THE VERSION THEY WOULDN'T A DIFFERENT
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STARRING
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1979 MIDNI NowIN The On miel 3 Stoo es,

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Fisher and other Republican council
members, who control the city's purse
strings by holding seven of the eleven
council seats, said they judge the per-
formance of a department on the basis
of the number of complaints they
receive about it.
The consensus among Republican
city council members is that since they
have not 'eceived any complaints about
Human Rights, then the department is
doing its job.
MAYOR LOUIS BELCHER said he

Human Rights' history.
Six years ago, Belcher said, the
Human Rights department received the
highest level of funding in its history.
But he said the number of complaints
processed by the department then was
"minute."
"The next step in that whole depar-
tment is going to largely depend on the
recommendation of the director and the
(citizens' advisory) commission"
which advises the division. But Belcher
emphasized that "Council's going to

LW
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INSTANT
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FOR YOUR ALBUMS
IN GOOD SHAPE.
& _

ELTON GREAEST
JOHN , HITS

599

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I e 71

In Concert Hill Auditorium Nov. 29
MCA Records & Tapes

_.

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