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October 21, 1979 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-21

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, October 21, 1979-Page 9
NEW PHASE OF RHODESIA TALKS
Rebels, whites debate election

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in the pack,
when we.at the PAPER CHASE CAN
meet your copying of graphic
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LONDON (AP) - Now that both
sides in the Zimbabwe Rhodesia peace
conference have accepted a British-
proposed constitution for the war-torn
territory, the real question - who will
be in charge during new elections -
must be answered.
Britain, which is sponsoring the
seven-week-old conference, calls the
phase that begins Monday "seeking
agreement on transition arrangements
before independence."
TO TIlE delegates now in London
from the southern African land of seven
million blacks and 230,000 whites, it is a
debate about power and whether they
End their supporters will live or die.
In the first six weeks, tempers flared

and distrust was obvious between the
delegation of the current Zimbabwe
Rhodesian government, led by Prime
Minister Abel Muzorewa, and the
Patriotic Front guerrilla alliance, led
by Joshua Nkomo and Robert Mugabe.
Muzorewa accepted the draft con-
stitution first, but the guerrillas balked
until Britain announced it was going to
hold unilateral talks with the Muzorewa
delegation. The guerrillas changed
their position last week.
BRITAIN IS unveiling a plan that,
sources say, calls for a cease-fire and
the naming of a British governor who,
backed by forces of the current gover-
nment, would take over from
Muzorewa and hold an election within a

few months of a London agreement.
The governor would then depart, and
independence would be granted to the
breakaway British colony, which for 14
years has struggled under international
economic sanctions and non-
recognition.
It is what happens just before and af-
ter this electoral transition that worries
the delegates in London and makes the
talks' chances of success appear slim.
The Front, which claims popular sup-
port and the power to win with bullets,
says elections will be rigged for
Muzorewa unless it has a prime say in
the transition administration and, more
importantly, its fighters are the core of
a new army.

MSU study identifies White
Lake contaminant as pesticide

NEITHER SIDE minds integrating
some "acceptable" men from the other
into its army. But each insists it will not
have its forces broken up by being in-
tegrated into the other side.
The Front has avoided bringing up its
past statements that it would put for-
mer Prime Minister Ian Smith and
other white-minority leaders on trial
before a "People's Court" for "war
crimes." And the Salisbury ad-
ministration has not renewed its
pledges to order its white-led, but
mainly black, troops to fight until they
kill or capture every last guerrilla and
wipe out Nkomo's war bases in Zambia
and Mugabe's in Mozambique..
But privately, some delegates make
little secret of their desire to settle old
scores once independence is achieved.
Smith unilaterally split from Britain
in 1965 to head off black rule. But his
move brought a world trade embargo
against the mutinous white-minority
regime, and despite his claim of in-
dependence, the nation was never in-
ternationally recognized.
Nkomo and Mugabe stepped up their
guerrilla war in 1978, when a
beleaguered Smith yielded power after
voters chose Muzorewa to lead Zim-
babwe Rhodesia.
free Exibiton
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Thurs., Oct. 25
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Belinda Campos
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PAPER CiASE
530 S.State-Ann Arbor,jMi.°48109 313-665-8065

'EAST LANSING (UPI)-Michigan
State University (MSU) researchers
say they have identified an unknown
chemical found in fish taken from
Muskegon County's troubled White
Lake as the pesticide Mirex. -
Dr. Fumio Matsumura, head .of
MSU's pesticide research laboratory,
said-Friday he believes the chemical
seeped into the lake from a Hooker
Chemical Co. waste dump near Mon-
tague.
A HOOKER spokesperson declined
immediate corhment on the findings by
the MSU scientist, saying only "no such
data has been brought to our atten-
tion."
The Hooker plant and adjoining dump
have been the focus of environmen-

talists' concerns for some time, with
reports of a variety of chemical
discharges into the lake from the
facility.
The state currently is involved in a
major contaminant lawsuit against the
chemical firm, seeking to force a clean-
up of the Hooker plant site.
MATSUMURA SAID it would be
several more days before researchers
determined just how much Mirex was
present in lake fish, although he said he
believed the levels would be in "parts
per million."
The Food and Drug Administration
has recommended fish containing more
than 0.1 part per million of Mirex not be

.eaten.
Earlier this month, the state Depar-
tment of Public Health issued a
statement saying tests on fish from
White Lake showed no contamination,
and the fish were safe to eat.
THE ChAIRMAN of the state Toxic
Substance Control Commission objec-
ted to the department statement,
saying test on the fish showed they con-
tained substances that had not yet been
identified.
Health officials later issued another
statement recommending White Lake
fish not be eaten.
Matsumuras said it would take ad-
ditional research to determine where in
the fish the Mirex was concentrated
and whether the fish are safe to eat.

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12 A.M.

Young leukemia victim buried

F,

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CINE

POLITICO

FromAP and t'PI
HASTINGS, Neb. - The tearful
parents of Chad Green buried the three-
year-old leukemia victim yesterday in
a private cemetery in the town of his
birth. But they still faced a legal battle
over their efforts to cure their sbn with
Laetrile.
Chad's father, Gerald, 29, collapsed
shortly after the funeral and was taken
by ambulance to a hospital. Green, who
had complained of stomach pains, was
treated and released. Physicians or-
dered complete bedrest for him and
suggested the same for his wife.
GREEN HAD left the gravesite with
his wife, Diana, 26, who was clutching a
Soviets visit
Krazy Jim S
like the soup
(Continued from Page 1)
The Soviets also visited Krazy Jim's
Blimpy Burgers. "They found the
breaded mushrooms and the soup very
enjoyable," said Latta. He added the
visiting: scientists took a trip to several
cooperatives, and were amazed at the
beauty and vastness of Inglis House.
Latta said the Soviet scientists were
reluctant to speak critically of their
government. "They denied having
domestic problems," explained Latta,
who added the scientists were . very
defensive about America's perception
of the "inferior" Soviet lifestyle.
Abraham Ortelius, the 16-century
Flemish geographer, was named
geographer to Philip 11 of Spain in'1575.

fuzzy white teddy bear, and with a
small group of friends, fami4, and(
reporters.
Chad Green died in his mother's arms
eight days earlier in Tiajuana, Mexico,
where his parents took him for Laetrile
therapy in defiance of a Massachusetts
court order.
The Greens had said they would
make a statement to reporters about
what action they intended to take
regarding a contempt-of-court citation
issued by a Massachusetts judge after
they fled the country last January to
seek treatment for Chad at a Mexican
Laetrile clinic.
THEIR ATTORNEY, William Gin-
sburg, told reporters the Greens had
decided to accept an offer of asylum
made by California Gov. Edmund

Brown Jr.
He said the couple planned to move to
San Diego after a brief stay in
Nebraska, where Gov. Charles Thone
has agreed to take no legal action for at
least a few days.
The Rev. Nathan Wood, a Baptist
minister from Scituate, Mass., where
the Greens had lived for 18 months, of-
ficiated at the burial. He said, "Chad
was not a symbol, Chad was not a
cause, he was a unique creation of
God."
SERVICES WERE conducted under
a sunny autumn sky. A brisk fall breeze
rustled through the trees, sprinkling
leaves over the site where the small
white casket was lowered into its grave.

SUN., Oct 21
8:00 P.M.
AUD "B" t

VENEZUELA
Venezuela. as it is today--an extreme contrast between the wealthy, a1d the
poor. Luxury portment houses are seen against makeshift shocks called
ronchitos.
LISTEN CARACAS is the first documentary
in a series that examines the socioeconomic reality of the indigenous groups
that inhabit the federal territory of the Amazon (Venezuela).
GUATEMALA
The COST OF COTTON is a documentary on the effects of the international
demand for cotton on a developing nation. The cotton workers. Quiche Indians,
impored by the thousands from the distant highlands, are the ones most
immediately affected.
For information:
Ethics and Religion
764-7442

I

. . ,.

HARVEY COX

Author: Turning East: the Promise and
Peril of the New Orientalism; The Seduc-
tion of the Spirit; Feast of Fools; The
Secular City; Professor at Harvard Divin-
ity School.

8:00 pm Mon. Oct. 22 at
New School Public Health Auditorium
"The Spiritul-aum--Plitca Crisis Of America"
(in cooperation with the Pilot Program)
10:00 Mon. morning at
First Baptist Church, 502 E. Huron
"What Would A Liberation Theology For The
First WorldLook Like"
A conversation with Prof. Cox who ,has visited Cuba and Brazil, taught in
Mexico, attended the Puebla Conf. -d is currently teaching a seminar in
liberation theology.
On SATURDAY MORNING at 10:30 Harvey Cox will be speaking on "The
Mission of the Church in the Decade of the 80s." Baptist Church, 502 E.
Huron.
Ethics and Religion (764-7442) in cooperation with First Baptist Church and
American Baptist Student Foundation.

During
McGraw-Hill Health
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October 22-26
you'll find discounts up to 50%
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a sweepstakes drawing for
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