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October 21, 1979 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N

BILLIARD TIPS
and
TECHNIQUES
Every Monday
4pm-5pm
DENNIS DIECKMAN-
at the
t: MICHIGAN UNION

Page 6--Sunday, October 21, 1979-The Michigan Daily

New, Cartereeg program"
faring better than previous plan

w

.

WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Carter's current energy program is
faring better in its trek through
Congress than did his 1977 "moral
equivalent of war" plan. But for every
xtwo steps forward, it gets knocked back
at least one step.
Action on the 1979 energy package is
fast coming to a head, with a whittled-
down verson of Carter's? "windfall
profits tax" finally out of the Senate
Finance Committee and other major
segments headed for crucial floor tests
in the coming weeks.
CARTER'S BIG 1977 energy plan
took a year and a half to get through
Congress and, when it finally emerged,
it was barely recognizable.

FT4Ac . IT_ %

" f Aft me l 1

By comparison with that earlier ef-
fort, the new plan, much of which was
fashioned during Carter's 10-day
retreat to Camp David early last sum-
mer, is doing quite well.
At least there have been no outright
casualties. But that is not to say there
have not been some heavy
modifications,
HERE IS where the various current
Carter energy initiatives now stand in
Congress:
ENERGY DEREGULATION-Car-
ter started lifting the price of natural
gas in his first energy bill, enacted in
1978, ordering price lids to be fully
phased out by 1985. By executive order,
Carter accomplished the same _thing
with U.S. produced crude oil, permit-
ting prices to rise gradualy to world
market levels by Octo01, 1981.
Carter's oil decontrol decision. took
effect automatically last June 1. The
only serious attempt. mounted in
Congress to block decontrol was turned
back earlier this month in the House, by
a 257-135 margin.
"WINDFALL PROFITS" TAX-Car-
ter has probably taken more of a
congressional drubbing on this plan
than on any other proposal in the
energy package, but at least the tax bill
is still alive and recognizable. It was
proposed as a companion to Carter's oil
decontrol decision and was designed to
keep oil companies from reaping "win-
dfall profits" from the lifting of oil price
lids.
The House debated the tax first and
passed a version fairly close to the-one
proposed by Carter. Four months after
the House vote, the Senate Finance

Committee on Friday approved its ver-
sion-a tax less than half as toughas
that recommended by Carter. The bill
goes next to the Senate-floor, where ac-
tion is expected in mid-November.*.
FUEL ASSISTANCE-The Senate
already has approved spending $1.2
billion on fuel assistance for the poor
ahid elderly this winter and is expected
to approve an 'additional $400 million
soon. The House is giving the legislation
rush treatment and Speaker Thomas
O'Neill is on the record as strongly' in
favor of the emergency appropriations.
GASOLINE RATIONING-The
House, after rejecting the president's
first request for standby gasolinie
rationing authority Iast May, takes up
the issue again this week, with leaders
predicting approval this time.
ENERGY MOBILIZATION
BOARD-Carter's proposal for a boa'rd
to oversea development, of- mayodr
energy projects, like pipelines and
refineries, and cut through federal re'd,
tape has been approved by the Senate.
Competing versions, await action by tie
House.
SYNTHETIC FUELS-The. ,House
has passed its own $3 billion version o1~p
bill to_ help subsidize, development of
synthetic fuels to replace imported oil.
Carter's more expensive plan is curren-
tly before congressional committees.
The, president had called for. an
energy security corporation to
distribute. federal subsidies. But he ha's
considerably scaled down his request
for $88 billion in such subsidies. In line
with that trimmed request, the Senate'
voted to spend $20 billion on the ,first
phase of the program.

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VBWLamNCHIE

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