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September 06, 1979 - Image 80

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-06

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Page D4-Thursday, September 6, 1979-The Michigan Daily
POTTERY CLASSES
AT THE
INN EIRBOR POTTERS'GUILD
Start Sept. 11 18- Week Term
$135 COVERS ALL COSTS

OPPOR TUNITIES FOR PERFORMER S

AND LISTENERS:

'U' hums with classical music

* NIGHT CLASSES FOR1N
* FLEXIBLE LAB HOURS P 6 FO
" GAS KILNS P 6-
Register at Guild Studio, 201 Hill St. near Main

IFo
4970

I I.-

_ _ _

..

Nice place to
enjoy friends, spirits
and good things.
to eat.

. By NINA SHISHKOFF
Down on State Street, between Pizza
Bob's and Pizza Bob's Uptown, there is
a painting of Ludwig Van Beethoven.
While it's impossible to ascertain his
likes or dislikes about the pizza, there's
no doubt he would have given the
thumb's up on the city's many classical
musical offerings.
The variety and quality of Ann Ar-
bor's classical music scene is so exten-
sive it may even be overwhelming. For
instance, the University's School of
Music alone produces more than four
hundred concerts and recitals each
year. For willing participants, other
areas, such as the school's Musical
Society and many non-University
groups screen auditions for bands,
choirs, and orchestras. Most such
tryouts are held sometime in early Sep-
tember.
FOR THOSE interested in perfor-
ming in. a band, the School of Music
sponsirs six such groups: the symphony
band, the concert and Varsity bands,
the Jazz Band, the Wind Ensemble, and
the Marching Band. Each of them
caters to a specific brand of music.
People who are more voice-oriented
also have several groups to choose
from. The largest is the three-hundred
member Choral Union, supported by
the Musical Society. Traditionally, it
presents Handel's oratorio Messiah
during the Christmas season.
Other ensembles include the Univer-
sity Choir, a 15-member group which

ocassionally appears with the Detroit
Symphony Orchestra. For non-music
majors, there is the ninety-member Ar-
ts Chorale, while the Men's Glee Club
and the jazz group aMaizin' Blues are
open to all students.
MUSICIANS LOOKING for or-
chestras instead of bands also have
several alternatives. The University
Symphony Orchestra and the Philhar-
monic are open to all qualified students.
They perform four or five repertory
concerts each year in addition to par-
ticipation in concerts, operas, and
choral performances.
Other performing groups include the
Chamber Orchestra, which specializes
in works for smaller ensembles, and the
University Campus Orchestra, which is
sponsored by the School of Music for
non-music majors only.
According to Charles Gabrion,
assistant professor of music and con-
ductor of the Campus Orchestra, most
members of his group can't join other
orchestras because of the extensive
time commitments required. Instead,
he said, many prefer his group, which
only meets for two hours per week. "It
fulfills a musical need. It's a social
outlet," he said.
THE SCHOOL of Music stages one
major operatic work each term, as well
as several programs of excerpts. In
past years, they have performed works
such as Mozart's Marriage of Figaro
and The Magic Flute.
The University Gilbert and Sullivan

opus each term, and the Comic Opera
Guild, which depends on local talent
and is not connected with the Univer-
sity, periodically stages operettas in
Ann Arbor and elsewhere in the Detroit
area.
Ona smaller scale, there are several
ensembles, such as the Baroque Trio
and the Woodwind Quartet, which are
composed of Music school faculty
members. On slightly different angles,
the College Musicum specializes in
early or little known music, and the
Contemporary Directions Ensemble
works mostly with new pieces, in-
cluding some written by music school
students.
For those who prefer to appreciate
classical music without actually per-
forming it, the Chamber Arts series
each year brings to the campus many
noteworthy performers. Among this
year's guests will be the Juilliard Quar-
tet, the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, and
the Quartetto Italiano. Other series
sponsored by the University each year
are the Choice Series of dance and
opera, the Summer Fare, and The
Debut and Encore Series.
SOME UNIVERSITY concerts are
free, and most others arecinexpensive.
Each year a benefit concert is held to
raise money for the School of Music's
fund and the Musical Society, em-
ploying the volunteered talents of
muscal greats such as cellist Mstislav
Rostropovich and conductor Eugene
Ormandy.
Aside from some of the more famous
acts which appear at Hill Auditorium,

most concerts on campus are presented
in the Power Center or Rackham
Auditorium. Many recitals, which are
more frequent and less formal than the'
concerts, are held in the recital hall on
North Campus.
When live performances are notes
available on campus, the classical
music fan can get the next best thing
from the radio. The University station,
WUOM 91.7 FM; specializes in classical
music and jazz. It also plays:recordings
of many of the concerts given on cam-
pus. The station also, carries infor-
mation on concerts in the area.
The University Record can help.
students keep track of entertainment
events. The weekly publication, found
in almost every University building,
lists classical music performances on
its calendar of events. Music at
Michigan, which can also help you in
keeping abreast of the classical music
on campus, can be found around the
music school or delivered by subscrip
tion. Also, a music hotline-763-
4726-gives callers a recorded list of
music school events.

RESTAURANT
300 S. Thayer
Across from Hill Auditorium

A

2

flicks:

LiPARTHENON GYROS
21~~ ~ auraiit
M FE GREEK FOOD ROME COOKED
* GYROS & SHISH-KA-BOB SANDWICHES "*GREEK SALADS
21 " MOUSAKA PASTITSIO DOLMADES 0 BAK LAVA
21 oSPINACH PIE GYROS PLATE ".YOGURT 8
p 0*COMBINATION PLATE 0 RICE PUDDING [
OPEN MON.-SAT. 11:00 AM TI L 12 MIDNIGHT 0
Complete Carry-out Servce SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS 12:00 AM - 12 MIDNIGHT I
21 226 S. Main at Liberty Ann Arbor PHONE: 994-1012 Ii

Society presents a Gilbert and Sullivan

STR IKE

FUR THOSE HARD TO GET
CHRISTMAS RESERVATIONS
NOW

classi~cs
as well, as:h
new filmS
(Continued from Page 3)
growth. The State Theatre has beent
.running regular midnight shows which
are usually rock concert films and
other youth generation fare, like Alice's
Restaurant and Easy Rider. And tho
Michigan Theater has one of those old;
Saturday-matinee organs, which some
people seem to find immensely char-
ming.
The Ann Arbor Theatre. Possibly the
ritziest of Ann Arbor's notably unritzy
theaters. The plan, or so some say, is to
convert it into two theaters, which
would be duly appreciated; last year, it
was able to hold Days. of Heaven for
exactly one glorious week.
The Fox Village. Converted to two
theaters last year, the Fox Village was
the one Ann Arbor movie-house I wish
they'd let be. It had the biggest screen,~
in the city, the only place where you
could watch Close Encounters without
feeling that the mother ship was going.
to slide off the edge of the screen. But,
what's done is done - the Fox Village.
and Renee Richards, I guess. By the'
way, this one is several miles off-
campus; don't even try to walk it.
The Briarwood Movies. There's ng
denying that Briarwood (located on the
edge of town) gets the cream of the,
cinematic crop, so if you want to catch
all the blockbusters, better' plan on
spending some time out there (and
See PLENTY, Page 11

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