100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 16, 1979 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-16
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Page 12-Tuesday, October 16, 1979-The Michigan Daily

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday,

A Kwik Kamera Krash Kourse

Entertaining the relevant i

By BRAD BENJAMIN
1954. It was the advent of photography
as an authentic hobby. Color films
became reliable tools for the
photographer's needs, and the single-
lens reflex camera was introduced to
the consumer market. The year also
marked the second generation since
Strand and Steiglitz made photography
an acceptable art form, and their spirit
was perpetuated by, photojournalists

Karsh and Eisenstadt. But photography camera seems to be the most requ
was still an esoteric interest due to its accoutrement for vacations, pa
expense and passive nature during the and family outings. The app
kinetic Fifties. faces of ┬░Michael Landon and Ca
1979. In twenty-five years, Polaroid, Bergen play upon our consumer
Instamatic, and Kodachrome have reminding us that we'd better hay
become household words. Com- cameras ready to roll and r
puterized production lines, today's fanciful adventures
technological improvements, and tomorrow's memories.
cheaper costs make cameras affor- If the pressure towards own
dable to nearly everyone. Today, the camera seems great, selecting on
be even more troublesome. What
of camera? What brand? What fea
are important? Photography, pe
unfortunately, offers a ceaseless
of choices, and an avid photograp
rarely satisfied with any of t
Perhaps some of the more conf
questions can be discussed ant
swered.
What type of camera do I want?
The important criteria here are
size and bulkiness. You don't n
degree in physics to understand th
larger film size (larger surface ar
the film) offers greater sharpne
SASS GASS- 44SS AS ' A$S O4
300

g SAS

nested your prints. On the other hand, the
arties, larger the film size, the more cumber-
le-pie some the mechanism becomes.
ndice That brings on another important
guilt, question: "Do you want to sacrifice
ve our convenience for a better picture?" Af-
ecord ter all, no one wants to haul a 40-pound
for camera and tripod to thcabeach. But no
one wants poor results, either. The
ing a camera buyer then must make the
e may decision: "When will I use my camera
t type the most?"
tures If you plan to photograph birthday,.
rhaps parties, the neighbor's puppies, or
array sneak previews of the'vomen's shower
her is room, I suggest that you investigate the
hem. Instamatic market. The 100 and 126
'using film formats offer cameras that weigh
d an- less than 8 ounces and are easy to
operate. Thoughtless photography-
merely point and shoot. Instamatic-
film like cameras are great for spontaneous
eed a shots since the photographer is not in-
at the volved with exposure or focusing.
rea of Undoubtedly, too, these cameras are
ss in the most favored for the budget-
minded.
IF YOU DESIRE to emulate those
high-quality prints that you see in
galleries, your pocketbook should be
prepared for the medium and large
format cameras. The large 4x5 and 8x10
cameras offer maximum photo quality,
but also demand expert technique. A
large format photographer usually
spends hours, not seconds, taking a
single photo, and it takes a librarian's
patience to operate these machines.
The medium-sized cameras, the 24 x
21 are the most common, and offer
great flexibility, professional features,
nice film size, and quality of optics.
p There is one main deterrent, though: A
3 good 2/4 system will cost you several
p thousand dollars.
y For the camera buyer who wants a
compromise between the ease of
* operation that Instamatics offer and the
p quality of large cameras, 35 mm is the
answer. These are the cameras that
Bruce Jenner and John Newcombe try
to ram down our throats on tv. This
type of camera offers the flexibility,
see WHAT, p. 13

By KEITH RICHBURG
Once again it bemoans writers and
critics of television to point out the
inadequacies of America's infant
medium. Once again, the networks are
passing off the likes of Mork and Mindy
and Laverne and Shirley as serving
best the nation's public interest, con-
venience and necessity: And once
again, the viewer is led mindlessly into
believing that the adventures of Richie
Cunningham really is the best
television can offer.
In defending the current trash (code
name: prime time programming) that
fills the airwaves, network executives
relentlessly insist that they give the
public what the public wants, and that

socially and politically relevant
television just doesn't sell. But to make
that claim assumes off-hand that to be
relevant,- a television program
automatically has to be dull.
To disprove that logic, the following
list suggest a prime time line-up that
demonstrates how- television can be
both relevant to the times and enter-
taining.
Darn That Pope (Debut). The Vatican
is the scene for this blasphemously wild
comedy about a zany pontiff and his
band of wacky cardinals. This week,
the fun begins when the pope runs into
an old flame and finds out he may be a
holy father.
That's My Mullah (Season premier).

Great Islamic fun every wek when
members of the studio audience com-
pete for a free trip to Mecca by trying to
assassinate the Shah and his royal
family.
My Man Moumar (Debut). Hilarious
new sitcom about a crazy Arab colonel
and his wacky band of international
terrorists, Yassir, Garly and "Doc."
This week, the boys find the plans for
building a nuclear device and the fun
begins.
Gromyko's Garrison (Rerun). Repeat
of the popular melodrama of the early
1960s about a tiny combat unit in the
Carribean that succeeds in bringing the
entire United States Senate to a stan-
dstill.
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly
(Debut). Ted Kennedy, Jimmy Carter
and Ella Grasso team up in this high-
powered soap opera-style drama about
politics, power and passion in the
highest corridors of American politics.
Viewer discretion is advised.
Three's Company (Debut). A wacky
California governor, a dizzy movie
starlet and a hippie ex-radical star in
the uproarious comedy about a
menage-a-trois on a mattress in a
Sacramento bachelor's apartment.
A Bridge Too Far (Drama). Gripping
suspense tale of a young Massachusetts

-a

C

Senator do
past and
bition.
Happy Da
of fun beg
rock ban
heroin.
Charlie's
two-hour
girls ma
liberated a
filtrate the
the bizarr
well-know
Eight-Tho
The new
lovable V
living in a
Joan Baez
"Love Boa
SI
Coc
UP T(
HOC
120

I
f0

s,

II
4c

Bass -300s:
when you re ready to move up
Our new Bass 300 collection is career-tailored to success. A
perfect merger of daylong comfort and high-heeled styling.
Beautifully crafted in fine leather.

CA
0e

ERIC'S
FACTORY OUTLET
Warmups-40 % off
Women's Jog Shoes
PUMA-TIGERS $15-$20
women's BANCROFTS $10.95
2 pair for $20
Men's BROOKS $12.95
SPEEDOS $9.00
Leotard & Tight Sets $9.25
40" Rain Jacket $16.95
White Stag Vests - Ir'S
were $65 now.$35.95
Rain Poncho-side snaps $1.75
Plaid Shirts $$12
Baconta T-Necks
were $19.50 now $10.50,
406 E. Liberty-663-6771
2 blocks off State St.
-ill

- e
- Th~7
DCM Time Windows
The superb speaker system
AUDIONICS of Oregon
High-Definition Electronics
Your exclusive local dealer is
TRANSYSTEMS, call 429-2143
Also open evenings and Sunday for your convenience
1 1
I2FREE 12 COKES
1 With Purchase of Any 1
1 1 Item or More Pizza
1 (WITH THIS AD)1
1 OPEN SUN-TIURS 11am-1am; FRI & SAT 11am-2am 1
Now Delivering to the N. Campus Area I
BELL'S GREEK PIZZA
995-0232
1 700 Packard at State Street
1
ir naw. , . I ' T

/ .
_ *
x i -'
-'-N,
S4

r,
... \

Y'

4>
f <;

LOUD ft

Andrea -
CLAETH CLOTH'-
65% Fortrel Polyester
Zip-Out Worrier of St. W
100% Orion Pile
Napped Satin Sleeve Lii
Full Harmony Print Linin
80 % Polyester' 20". Co
Shell. Completely Wash'
~4t"
c34 Cm

Douglas
r35 % Combed Cotton CLAETH CLOTH'
,oritz Cloth 65% Fortrel Polyest
ZipyOut Wormer of St.
ing 100% Orlon' Pile
igof Napped Satin SleeveL
oto efCohYk ie 1 5'n Wear. II Sleeve Lining of 100%
Shell Campletely WcM
We Carry the complete line of Men's and Y
Fall 1979 London Fog Raincoats, Topco'ots a
Mrl
hs Ap dae Ever

The

(444 Shoe Store

529 E. Liberty St.

~I)PareI

"Ann Arbor , . M-F9:30-8:00
665-9797 SAT 9:30-6:00
SUN 1:00-5:00

306.310 S. State St.
I OPEN THURS. AND FRI. KITES UNTIL 8
P AR K FREE IN MAY~NARD ST. CARPORT. WE WILLUGLADLY V

Back to Top

© 2023 Regents of the University of Michigan