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October 14, 1979 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-14

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, October 14, 1979-Page 3
TIGH T SECURITY FOR VISIT PROMPTS COMPLAINTS:
Castro talks with Black leaders

From UPI and AP
.NEW YORK - Cuban President Fidel Castro
yesterday settled in for an indefinite stay in the United
States and held court at his country's United Nations
"mission in midtown Manhattan for a stream of visitor-
Outside the Cuban mission, Secret Service agents
and contingents of the 2,000-man police guard assigned
to protect the bearded Caribbean leader kept watch on
small groups of anti-Communist protesters.
'CASTRO MET FOR more than three hours yester-
day with two members of the Black Congressional
Caucus, Who later described the meeting as a wide-
iranging discussion of world issues.

It was one of several meetings Castro was expected
to have before returning to Cuba. Ellen Fleysher,
spokeswoman for the Police Department, said the
Cuban president was expected to remain in New York
through tomorrow and possibly longer. He arrived
early Thursday.
Rep. Ronald Dellums (D-Calif.), said the discussions
"reaffirmed my notion that he (Castro) is a very sen-
sitive and thoughtful, intelligent human being who is
concerned not only about his own country but the con-
ditions of the world."
DELLUMS, WHO IS considered one of the most
liberal members of the House, said the talks covered
East-West concerns about peace, the ratification of the
SALT II pact and "the non-problem" of the 3,000 Soviet
combat troops in Cuba.
Also in on the meeting was Rep. George Thomas
LeLand (D-Texas), who, like Dellums, had met with
Castro during a previous visit to Cuba.
Both said later that they viewed tfie meeting as an
opportunity for the caucus to become more involved in
the nation's dealings overseas.
"THE CONGRESSIONAL Black Caucus has the
potential to moveinto the central body politic again to
express our concerns for peace," Dellums said.
Outside the mission yesterday, there were scattered
protests from anti-Castro groups, but they were far
smaller than the protests Friday, when 3,000 angry
protesters, including Castro's sister, Juanita, called
for his ouster.
Fleysher said that the security detail guarding the
mission had been reduced from 400 to 325 persons, but
the "frozen zone" around the building was being main-
tained to keep protesters away.
CASTRO'S VISIT WAS costing $100,000 daily in
police overtime for which the city would be reimbursed
by the federal government, a police spokesman said.

The presence of the Cuban leader frustrated neigh-
borhood residents and merchants in the area known as
Murray Hill.
"I can't go on like this," said Wanda Bongiorno, who
lives near the mission and at the center of the frozen
zone.
"BUSINESS WAS OFF 25 per cent when they first
set up their barricades," said the owner of La Maison
Japonaise, a corner restaurant. "It's off 75 per cent
now and I'll continue to do poorly as long as this state of
seige continues."
People who live in the frozen zone must pass through
a security barricade, known as Checkpoint 3, whenever
they want to leave the area. When they return, they're
accompanied to their doors by security agents.
Carol Calinoff, 28, was arrested Friday when she did
what neighbors have been threatening to do since
Castro arrived - kicked a security officer who stopped
her at the checkpoint.
CASTRO'S GUESTS have been coming to him, since
the Secret Service has advised the Cuban president to
stay inside the mission for his own safety while he is in
New York.
Castro, an avid baseball fan, also was reported
yesterday to be watching the World Series and rooting
for the Pittsburgh Pirates.
THE SECRET SERVICE, which said it did not know
what Castro was going to do until he did it, was
checking reports that Castro was planning to stay until
at least Wednesday for a possible meeting with Yasser
Arafat, head of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
But U.N. sources said an Arafat visit now was
unlikely. "He (Arafat) wouldn't come to New York just
to meet Castro," said one source.
A spokesman for the State Department in
Washington said he was unaware of any plans for
Arafat to meet with Castro.

JANE.
FONDA

.;

TOM
HA VDEN

w ast ro
will stay indefinitely

T"ECONOMIC DEMOCRACY:
CRITICAL ISSUES IN THE 80's"

Gays join forces in Washington
today to march for civil rights

From AP and UPi
WASHINGTON - Thousands of
'homosexuals throughout the nation
are hoping to flex political muscle at
the federal level with what is being
billed as the first gay march on
Washington.
The march and rally today at the
Washington Monument is intended to
dramatize demands for "an end to all
social, economic, judicial and legal op-
pression of lesbian and gay people,"
according to marcy spokesman Brandy
Moore.
YESTERDAY "Parents of Gays"
urged parents of homosexuals to "come
out of the closet and support your gay
children."'
The group, claiming 32 chapters
the country, told a :news con-
nce,"that legislation should be
M$ssed'guaranteeing the civil rights of
hmosexuals
"Parents of gays are in Washington
to speak for our children and the whole
r family," said Adele Starr, a mother of
R'

five and leader of Los Angeles' Parent
and Friends of Gays.,
ONE OF THE marchers' specific ob
jectives is passage of a gay rights bil
by Congress that would giv
homosexuals protection under the Civi
Rights Act against discrimination.
Rep. Ted Weiss (D-N.Y.), who in
troduced the bill to Congress earlie
this year and has gathered severa
dozen colsponsors, will address the
marchers..
Weiss' bill prompted Rep. Larry Mc
Donald (D-Ga.), to introduce an anti
homosexual resolution in Congress in
July. He wants the lawmakers to go on
record opposing any "special con
sideration or protective status unde
the law" for homosexuals.
NEITHER MEASURE has made
very much progress.
A coalition of fundamentalis
ministers and conservative Christian
lobbying groups who support McDonald
are staging news conferences an

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prayer sessions today to oppose the
marchers.
Gary Jarmin, a lobbyist for Christian
Voice, said the groups have called for
"a national day of prayer on
homosexuality."
But the prayer session will be held in
a congressional office building, a mile
from the rally, and Jarmin said no con-
frontation with the marchers was ex-
pected.
"We want to avoid a confrontation in
the physical, although not in the
spiritual or moral sense," he said.
The march has been planned for a
year and organizers were predicting a
turnout of at least 100,000, but local
police were expecting a much smaller
crowd.

DOG STATUE
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP)-
Standing in front of an old three-story"
house here is a 4-foot-tall, 340-pound
iron statue of a Labrador.
It has been there for three-quarters of
a century; having weathered attacks
from vandals and pranksters.
It is believed the statue was erected
after the dog had performed some
heroic deed. It is also believed the dog's
name was Rover.
Mrs. Robert Carrel, whose family
bought the house in 1970, says the dog is
a hero to children now growing up in the
neighborhood. And tour buses slow
down and sometimes stop for a better
look at the dog.
Second Chance's
Hospitality
and
Student Night
for info call:994-5350

MOM., OCT. 15
7:30 P.M.
HILL A UD.

GET YOUR
TRCKENS NOW'
.#at fticket central
in Union

250at door

(i:

LECTURES

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L.

Two die,

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TbW - A

SUNDAY
FILMS
Cinema Guild Building a Kayak and The Living Stone, animated films,
free, Old Arch. Aud.
El Cine Politico-Six Days in Soweto, 8 p.m., Angell, Aud. B.
PERFORMANCES
Viola Recital-Nancy Yagiela, 4 p.m., School of Music, Recital Hall.
Horn Students Recital-Stearns, 8 p.m.
SPEAKERS
Recycle Ann Arbor-Mayor Louis Belcher and State Sen. Ed Pierce
(D-Ann Arbor) will speak at an open house, free cider and donuts, 221 Felch,
; 1-4p.m.
Nicaraguan Solidarity Committee-Arturo Cruz, Nicaraguan Am-
bassador, "Current Needs in Nicaragua," and Prof. Phillip Dennis, Texas
.r Tech University, "The Miskito Indians in the Revolutionary Process," 3
p.m., Residential College, Room 126.
Ananda Marga-Acarya Nidhish, yogic monk, will speak on "Higher
~'Consciousness and Social Obligtion," 8 p.m., Michigan Union, International
Center.
MISCELLANEOUS
Michigan Media-The Dickens World, Bleak House, 7 a.m., Channel 4,
v WDIV-TV.
Hiking Club-meet at Rackham N.W. entry on E. Huron, 1:30 p.m.
Exhibit-Upper Peninsula Artists, exhibition of prints, weaving, and
ceramics, Union Gallery, through November 4.
Meeting-Synthesis, for continuation of work begun at workshop, 5 p.m.,
Alice Lloyd Hall, Blue Carpet Lounge.
Video tape-Doris Chase Video Tape Dance Series, 8 p.m., Dance
Building, StudioA Theater.
MONDAY
FILMS
Cinema Guild-Inuit Film Series, Buliding a Kayak, animated films, 8
'-p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
Wesley Brown-Bag Film-Why Man Creates, 12:10 p.m., free, Wesley
Foundation Pine Room, 602 E. Huron.
PERFORMANCES
University Musical Society-Michael Lormer, guitarist, 8:30 p.m.,
Rackham.
Studio Showcase: Recital from Studio B-Live broadcast on WUOM/
' WVGR, 91.7/104.1 FM, 8:05 p.m.
SPEAKERS '
UAC-Viepoint Lectures, Jane Fonda and Tom Hayden, 7:30 p.m.,
Hill.
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics-Prof. Richard
Skalak, "Analysis of Capillary Blood Flow," 4 p.m., 229 W. Engineering.

d44 hurt
d
in train
collision
From AP and UPI
HARVEY, Ill.-A railroad worker
threw a switch too soon and sent an
Amtrak passenger train crashing head
on into a parked freight train, killing
two people and injuring 44 others, in-
vestigators said yesterday.
A jumble of twisted metal was left on
the tracks after the crash in this
Chicago suburb Friday night. Officials
estimated damage at $1 million.
THE WRECK WAS the second for
Amtrak in 10 days. On Oct. 2, the "Lone
Star" derailed near Lawrence, Kan.,
killing two crew irembers and injuring
50 passengers.
"A lot of people were moaning and
crying and I almost passed out," said
Mark Schwolow, an 18-year-old student
at Southern Illinois University. He said
he :was seated one instant, then, "the
next thing I knew I was.getting up off
the floor-or trying to."
Passengers were screaming as one of
the coaches landed on its side. More
than 200 .passengers were aboard the
train which originated in Carbondale,
home of the university.
THE AMTRAK TRAIN, carrying
dozens of college students to Chicago in
five new double-decker "Superliner"
coaches, plowed into the 40-car freight
sitting on Illinois Central's mainline
track waiting for the northbound Am-
trak train to pass.
The lead engine of the freight was
thrown 30 feet and the first Amtrak
engine was cracked in the middle.
Illinois Central engineer Harold
Coghlan, 54, of Chicago Heights and
brakeman Richard Kinger, 21, of Coun-
try Club Hills were killed.
ALFRED SCHULTZ, 58, an East
Hazel Crest firefighter, suffered a heart
attack while helping rescue injured and
died early yesterday, authorities said.
Ten of the 44 others who were injured
remained hospitalized.
Jerome Krohn, a National Transpor-

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