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October 12, 1979 - Image 12

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-12

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Page 12-Friday, October 12, 1979-The Michigan Daily

A carillon player named Teague,
Suffered from staircase fatigue.
Said he with a wink,
"I'll play better I think,
"If I take all my meals at the League.''
P.D.
Se;
The Iwchigan Ma
7 227~
Next to Hill Auditorium Y2
Located in the heart of the campus. tick
t is the heart of the campus . one

CAFETERIA HOURS;
11:30-1:15
5:00-7:15
SNACK BAR
7:]5-4:00

American, British scientists receive Nobel
rize for separate work in X-ray research

nd your League Limerick to:
nager. Michigan League
7South Ingalls
i will receive 2 free dinner
kets if your limerick is used in
e of our ads.

From AP and Reuter

'" i Ti
. S
MRCHIG NUNION
SEVENTY-FIFTH
ANIVRSA RY
The Michigan Union was founded by Edward F. "Bob" Parker,
a 1904 ISA graduate. He wanted a place where students,
faculty and alumni could get together and feel bound by a
common spirit. With their help Parker was able to see his
visions carried out, and as a result we now have a student
center. The Michigan Union was the prototype for the majority
of college unions in the country.

STOCKHOLM, Sweden-The Nobel
Prize for medicine was awarded
yesterday to an American and a Briton
who in their separate ways helped
develop an X-ray technique-computer
assisted tomography-that enables
man to peer more clearly and safely
than ever into the human body.
Physicist Allan M. Cormack, 55, of
Tufts University in Medford, Mass.,
said he was "amazed" to learn that the
Royal Caroline Medico-Surgical In-
stitute had selected him for the 1979
prize.
HIS CO-WINNER, Godfrey Houn-
sfield, 60, a research engineer with the
British electronics firm EMI, .told a
London news conference, "I must say
that I thought that I had done well, but
never expected this."
Hounsfeld noted he was a rare
phenomenon,-a Nobel science winner
without a university degree. As a young'
man he attended a technical school,
then entered the RoyalAir Force, and
finally joined EMI as a radar specialist.
The choice apparently was a surprise
to the Institute's Nobel selection com-

mittee as well. Informed sources said
the committee's recommendatibn was
overridden by the 54 Institute faculty
members who made the final choice.
THIS UNPRECEDENTED veto
reportedly was made after a long and
heated debate within the Institute. The
identity of the committee's choice was
not publicly known.
The medicine award was the first of
the six annual Nobel prizes to be an-
nounced. The physics, chemistry and
economics prizes will be awarded next
week, and the literature and peace
prizes in the days or weeks following.
President Carter has been nominated
for the peace prize. Last year, six of the
nine laureates were Americans.
Cormack and Hounsfield, who for
years were unaware of each other's
research, will share a record $190,000
award for their contributions to the X-
ray technique.
CORMACK IS the 53rd U.S. citizen to
win the medicine award, which has
been dominated by Americans in recent
decades.
A native of South Africa, Cormack
was cited for doing the mathematical

analyses that laid the groundwork for
the computerized technique. Hounsfield
was honored as the "central figure" in
its practical development.
Many in medicine view the "CAT"
scanning method as a revolution equal
to the discovery of the X-ray itself
almost a century ago.
"This is only the beginning," said

use for only six years it has become an
extremely quick, highly effective
diagnostic technique, especially for the
brain.
Cormack, educated at the University
of Cape Town and Cambridge, moved to
the United States in 1956 and became a
U.S. citizen 10 years later. He published
his analysis of the mathematical

Sitrust sa.v that I thought that I had done well, ba
nterer expectedl this.
-Godfrey' Hounsfjield

Cormack. "It is my belief that in time
this (body-scanner) will replace X-rays
as treatment for tumors," he told a
press conference at Tufts.
THROUGH THE scanner,.the dose of
radiation is cut by one-third to one-
tenth that of X-rays now used to
examine tumors.
It adds a new dimension to traditional
X-raying and though in general hospital

problem in 1963-64.
Hounsfield has worked for EMI-an
electronics firm that manufacturers
medical equipment but is known best as
a producer of Beatles" and other record
albums-since the early 1950s. He was
an early pioneer in development of
large solid-state computers, and his
work on automatic pattern recognition
put him onto the idea of the CAT.

BUT GROUP SHORT OF FUNDS

Survey to determine building

By AMY DIAMOND
A local group will soon survey the
city's buildings to find out how ac-
cessible the edifices are to hatidicapped
persons. The Ann Arbor Center for In-
dependent Living (AACIL) expects to
begin the project despite the fact that it
has mustered only half the $15,000
group officials feel they need for the
survey.-
The survey of local businesses,
schools, banks and agencies will
determine which buidings contain "ar-
chitectural barriers" to physically
handicapped individuals and senior
citizens. The outcome of the survey will
be the development of an accessibility
guidebook for the city's mobility-
limited individuals.
"WE LOOKED AT other surveys for
reference. We want to find out whether
there are existing facilities for the han-
dicapped and which buildings are ac-
cessible, and how a certain building
compares with the standard," ex-
plained Cheryl Pelava, research

assistant for the AACIL.
The Center, which opened in Novem-
ber of 1976, was the first center of its
kind in Michigan. It is a non-profit cor-
poration that developed as a result of
the needs expressed by physically han-
dicapped individuals.- These needs -
include housing, transportation, ad-
vocacy, attendant care and peer coun-
selling - are all services the AACIL
provides.
AACIL officials initially thought of
doing the survey and accompanying
booklet in January of 1978 and
estimated the project would cost $15,000
for a paid secretary, a coordinator, and
funding to publish the guidebook.
THE GROUP asked Ann Arbor City
Council for $7,500 for the project, but
council turned down the request' this
summer. The Washtenaw United Way,
gave the AACIL. $5,500 for the survey'
and AACIL members expect to receive
an additional $2,000 from the Ann Arbor
Area Foundation, a non-profit
organization that provides funds for
community programs and projects.
Though the project will be carried
out, the absence of $7,500 from the city
caused the AACIL to discontinue its
plans to pay a secretary and coor-
dinator. The group is now relying on 50-
60 volunteer workers and four CETA

workers to conduct the survey.
According to Pelava, council felt that
funding for the survey was an inap-
propriate use of city money.
SECTION 504 of the federal
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 states that no
handicapped individual be ,excluded
from participating in, be denied the
benefits of, or be discriminated against
under any program or activity
receiving federal financial assistance.
"It's (the Rehabilitation Act of 1973)
a federal regulation, so the city feels
the federal government should pay for
it and they're (the city) not going to pay
for it," Pelava said.,
Councilmember Louis Senunas (R-
Third Ward), said, "The opposition to
the survey is that it seems awfully ex-
pensive for a cataloguing of this type of
information. We just don't have money
to meet those requests. It would be nice,
but to fund those you would have to get
more money from the taxpayers."
SENUNAS ADDED, "The project is a
very expensive way to get information
that is already available or can be got-
ten in a cheaper way."'
One alternative idea council mem-
bers have proposed is an ordinance that
would require businesses to specify if
they are barrier-free in the yellow
pages of the city telephone directory.

cessibility
But while Pelava said the yellow
pages would provide another reference
for people to look at, she said the'
listings "might be done merely to look
like the city is complying with the
(federal) codes. We're really concer
ned that they will do a very minimum
job with people who don't really know;
what they're doing."
COUNCIL MEMBER Ken Latta (D-
First Ward), said he was in favor of
funding the survey, but noted that,
"The city government and its buildings
aren't even in compliance. The city
hasn't lived up to it's own standards
regarding accessibility."
Although the city has not helped fund
the survey, many members of the
community have supported the AACIL
in its endeavor. The Ann Arbor Cham-
ber of Commerce, the mayor, four'
merchant organizations, and many
social service agencies support the
guidebook.
"The survey is not an enforcement,
kind of activity. We're going to use its-
a guidebook to aid these people so they
can use it as a resource book. Anybody
can be in the survey, it's free and it's up
to the business to initiate any kind of ac-
tion," Pelava explained.
Federal
workersfce
payls

SECOND
ce79-1776 C IIMCE
_216S. Fourth Ave. 994-5350
TRAVEL CONSULTANTS (Near Liberty?

ahnrfinnU

SFreePregnancy Testing
Immediate Results
Confidential Counseling
Complete Birth Control Clinic
Medicaid " Blue Cross
(313) 9411810Ann Arbor and
Downriver area
(313) 559-0590 Southfield area
Northland Family Planning Clinic, Inc.

i

OCTOBER 7 - OCTOBER 13, 1979
HAPPY 75th MICHIGAN UNION!
EXHIBIT - MAIN LOBBY - ALL WEEK - 75 years of Michigan
tradition in photos, drawings, scrapbooks, posters.v
TABLE CARVING - MAIN LOBBY - ALL WEEK - immortalize
yourself, your club, or housing unit. Carve the table tops that will go
in the coming student pub and grill.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12 - 4 p.m. - FRONT STEPS - REDEDICATION
CEREMONIES AND RECEPTION
9'p.m. BALLROOM - THE UAC GONG SHOW - 75¢- See the best of
Michigan's students make fools of themselves in competition.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13 - AFTER THE GAME: Free cake and
cider front steps. Free Billiards / Bowling until 2 a.m. for all students,
staff, and lifetime union members.
8 p.m. - 1 a.m. - BIRTHDAY BASH - FREE - music, dancing,
partying with the UM Jazz Band, the Friars, the aMaizin' Blues, The
Wiz Kids (Rock 'n Roll and Country Rock Band)
75th Anniversary Souvenir Books & Paperweights at
Lobby Main Stand.
Info: UAC 763-1107 or Jeff Lebow 763-4182
-A - ----l-o-,

- ---- .

44
l
I
i
j
I
I
f

Why get caught up
in the pack,
when we at the PAPER CHASE CAN
meet your copying of graphic
needs all under one roof?
Centrally located on the basement floor
of the Michigan Union makes it easy for
obtaining the quickest service possible.
With services like these why go anywhere else?

pyday
WASHINGTON (AP)-A House-
Senate conference on an emergency
funding bill collapsed in chaos yester-
day, increasing the possibilty of a
payless payday for more than a million
military personnel and reduced
paychecks for hundreds of thousands of
government workers.
The breakdown came only minutes
after negotiators for the two houses of
Congress had agreed on a fragile com-
promise on the biggest issue holding up
the bill-language limiting federal fun-
ding for abortions.
BUT SENATE conferees refused to
agree on the last issue of
disagreement--the 5.5 per cent pay
raise in congressional salaries passed
by the House.
House negotiators then backed out of
the agreement on abortion language,
putting the negotiations back to the
beginning.
Both sides instructed their 'staffs to
work overnight on a short-term stopgap
lproposal that could head off the impgn-
dingcutbacks in federal paychecks and
restore funds for some programs
already cut off.

GRAPHIC ARTS DI
.Filers Logo
Business Cards * P
Camera Workea Heat'
Custom printed T-

VISION
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osters
Transfers
shirts

DUPLICATING DIVISION
Student and Faculty Discounts
Quality Reproduction-
Both Offset and Photocopying
Dissertations 9Course Packs
Free Collating * Resumes

PAPER CH ASE
530 S. State-Ann Arbor,Mi48109 '°313-665-8065

EL

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POLITICO

SUN., OCT.
8:00 P.M.
AUD. "B"

14

Six Days
in Soweto

"Six Days in Soweto" is a cinematically stunning
and emotionally powerful film-not merely a
record of rebellion against the violence of apar-
theid, but an insight into the daily lives and

VI ~*

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