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October 12, 1979 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-12

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 12, 1979-Page 9
LSA SOPHOMORE 'WORKED HARD'
>First woman picked as ROTC commander

By DON WYATT
Being a female in a "man's" army
ooesn't bother Cathy Leistikow, the fir-
$f woman battalion commander of the
uiniversity's Army ROTC program.
In fact, when Leistikow gives orders
they are usually the first to be followed.
"SHE SIMPLY gets around the
macho in men. She doesn't sweet talk
tiem but tells them what has to be
d'ne, and they do it," said Major Joe
Blair, chairman of the Army ROTC
p'togram.
;Leistikow, an LSA sophomore, is the
first woman to hold the prestigious
commandership position in any of the
services on campus and in the state of
Michigan.
But Blair insists that Leistikow is not

a "token female." "She got the job
because she worked hard to get it.
There is no way I could have picked a
better qualified leader than Cathy,"
Blair said.
SOME OF Leistikow's qualifications
include a three-year stint in the Army
"to see the world' and a job in Korea as
commander of the FM radio station
serving General John Cushmen.
After her tour of duty was over she
passed up an offer to re-enlist and
decided to return to school - in hopes of
someday becoming an officer.
"Basically, I went back to school to
become an officer," Leistikow said.
"It's not that officers get privileges, but
I liked the fact that I would be more in-
volved in the planning operations and I

could use my own ideas."
LEISTIKOW SAYS, however, that
being a woman in her position is not
particularly advantageous: "Maybe if I
do well, people will say 'that girl did a
good job.' But it really boils down to - I
wanted the job, worked hard to get it,
and eople think that it is really neat
that Y got the job. The fact that I am a
woman is just a matter of circumstan-
ce."
Aside from Leistikow's ROTC duties,
she is also a supervisor at Bells Greek

Pizza and carries a 16 credit class load.
After Leistikow graduates from the
ROTC program in the spring, she will
be commissioned as a second lieutenant
in the Army Reserve 6ntil she
graduates from the University in the
Fall of 1982.
"CATHY HAS the potential to be a
general, no question about it," Blair
said. "Not only is she qualified, but
other women look up to Cathy just for
who she is, not because she is female."
"She is a leader," Blair added.

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House votes to lift
price controls on
domestic crude oil'

The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
announces:
Petitions for the Spring Show
to be produced April 13-19, 1980. Those interested in petitioning
for positions of dramatic. director, orchestral and/or vocal
director, and set designer are asked to call 764-0951 by Thurs.,
Oct. 18 for further information.

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From AP and Reuter
WASHINGTON -The U.S. House of
Representatives yesterday voted over-
vwhelmingly to support President Car-
ter's plan to increase domestic crude oil
production by gradually lifting price
controls.
By 257 to 135, the House defeated a
piroposal to reimpose controls on the
price of oil discovered prior to the 1973
Arab oil embargo. This oil now accoun-
ts for about two-thirds of total domestic
p'roduction.-
The vote supported the president's
order lifting price controls on all
domestic crude over the 28 months
beginning last June 1. The president
estimated his executive order would
raise daily production by 750,000
barrels by the mid-1980s.
,CONGRESSMEMBERS favoring the
president's plan argued that controls
have subsidized and increased oil im-
ports by making the price paid by
American consumers less than the
world price.
However, Congress members
arguing for the continuation of controls
said that the higher fuel prices that
wouldresult fromremoving controls
would be inflationary and give a bonan-
z4 to oil companies.
The House also rejected, on a 243-124
S ls-wveeping proposaT to stap
ndicese trots back on home heating oil
and diesel fuel.
THE CRUDE OIL vote came as the
Douse considered legislation
authorizing Department of Energy
programs for the fiscal year that began
Oct. 1.
'House liberals argued that the price
control phase-out that Carter began on
June 1 was lining the pockets of big oil
companies at the expense of U.S. con-
sumers.
Imported crude oil, whose price is set
,by members of the Organization of
Petroleum Exporting Countries, now
costs around $23 to $24 a barrel -
roughly twice the average controlled
price of U.S. Oil.
BUT WHITE House allies .in the
House argued that despite the added

burden on consumers, the higher prices
triggered by deregulation would en-
courage conservation and the search
for new U.S. oil supplies.
A coalition of Republicans and con-
servative Democrats joined forces with
the administration in defeating the
move to block the phasing out of con-
trols on crude oil prices.
The vote removed the most serious
obstacle to Carter's deregulation plan,
which has never been in serious jeopar-
dy in the Senate. It also reversed a non-
binding vote by House Democrats last
spring that renounced Carter's oil
pricing policies.
HOUSE SPEAKER Thomas (Tip)
O'Neill, citing fuel oil prices of over 90
cents a gallon in parts of the country,
told reporters "there is a great feeling
that the price should be pegged
somehow by the federal government."
The Massachusetts Democrat said
many Americans in cold-weather states
are far more troubled by the price of
heating oil than they are about gasoline
prices of over $1 a gallon.
Oil price deregulation has been por-
trayed by the Carter administration as
an essential action in the drive to spur
the search for alternatives to oil impor-
ted from memberi of the Organization
of Petroleum Exporting Countries.
In two separate non-binding votes, a
majority of House Democrats
previously went on record in favor of
reimposing price controls on both crude
oil and petroleum products.

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IN SEARCH of THE UNION

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75th
Birthday

75th
Birthday

IDENTIFY THESE 5 UNION SITES &
* WIN.2 OHIO STATE TICKETS *
(50 yd. line tickets)
1. Submit entry to Office of Student Organizations, Activities, and Programs--1310 Union.
2. Use entry form (availble at office) or your own paper-enter as many times as you want.
3. DEADLINE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12th-in case of a tie-drawing will be held.
4. WINNER ANNOUNCED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13th! GOOD LUCK!
COME TO THE UNION and SEARCHI

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THE STROH BREWERY COMPANY, DETROIT, MICHIGAN @ 197

We don't play
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We are serious!
U-M stylists
at the UNION
Dave, Chet, and Ted

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SIMCHAT TORA H
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TRADITIONAL
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SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 13th
AT HILLEL
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"Tom, crying in your beer is one thing .
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