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September 06, 1979 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


t

I

Page 2A-Thursday, Septerr'er 6, 1979-The Michigan Daily

'U' Celia
By PATRICIA HAGEN
After settling a three-day strike last modth,
negotiators for University Cellar employees
and the bookstore's management team say
they are close to reaching agreement on the
union's first contract.
The members of Industrial Workers of the
World (IWW) Local 660 ratified a tentative ver-
sion of the contract at a meeting Monday night,
according to union negotiator Bill Vargo.
Cellar Assistant Manager John Sappington
said the management negotiators are "almost
ready" to take a version of the contract to the
store's Board of Directors for approval. -
"WE ARE ALMOST to the end," Sappington
said Tuesday. "We're really close to getting the
whole thing done." He said the management
will probably meet with the union this week to

r emp'loyees'ck
discuss union-membership requirements for discuss store structure. Despite this
the store's employees and clauses concerning breakthrough union members voted to strike
rush employees. because of lack of progress on other issues.
Because of dissatisfaction over the slow In other labor-related developments, 12 em-
progress of negotiations union members ployees at the campus branch of the Huron
walked off their jobs for two and one-half days Valley National Bank requesting a 27.5 per cent
last month, prompting a temporary closing of wage increase walked off the job Tuesday
the bookstore. Union negotiator Vargo said during the traditional rush at the beginning of
management agreement to some union the school year.
demands ended the walkout. Bank operations were not affected by the
MORE THAN 70 employees at the student- picketers in front of the bank at the corner of
owned bookstore have been represented by 'Ae North University and South Thayer, according
IWW since January. Since then contract to Assistant Vice-President for Personnel Cin-
negotiations have been proceeding slowly dy Grzelak. She said the usual number of
because of disputes over the managerial struc- tellers were working despite the walkout.
ture of the store. The employees decided to strike because
At a meeting August 13, the Board of Direc- "we've had no response whatsoever" from the
tors agreed to include two union members on management to a letter requesting the increase
the Board and set up a joint committee to in hourly wages, said Janet Bartuk, a teller

ise' to se
pacing in front of the bank.
Mary Lewison, a head teller at the branch,
said the large increase was being requested
because of the present rate of inflation and
what she called low hourly wages.
IN A STATEMENT issued Tuesday by the
bank, management said the picketers "do not
represent the feelings of the majority of the
bank employees."
But Lewison estimated 90 per cent of the 185
employees at the bank's seven branches are
dissatisfied with wage levels. She attributed
the low participation in the walkout to fear of
being fired, despite the fact that picketers were
told they would not lose their positions because
of the demonstration.
Bartuk said the bookkeeping and proof
departments at the Stadium Street branch
were expected to stop work yesterday.

ttlement
In another labor dispute, the 24-day strike 14
skilled trades workers on campus ended
after an agreement with the University was
reached following a third meeting with a
mediator Aug. 24.
The 318 union members, represented by t
Washtenaw County Local Building Trades
Board of Directors, won pay increases betweep
$1.13 and $1.67 per hour over the 23 months ?f
the new contract.
THIS IS equivalent to an 18.6 per cent in-
crease for the majority of the trades council
members who include electricians, construe-
tion workers, painters, and other skillets
workers, according to union spokesperson Dick
Mericle.
The strike slowed campus deliveries anal
scheduled repairs at University Hospitat, A
Michigan Stadium, and other campus
Sbuildings.

611 Church Street
Ann Arbor, Mi. 996-2747
sip
Sup'
swizz e

AC

ADEMIC V.P. TO ASSUME POST JAN.1:

Regents name Shapiro

i

Continued from Page 1)
SHAPIRO'S PREDECESSOR was
equally complimentary. "It's a superb
appointment," said Fleming by tele-
phone from Washington. "They could
not have done better."
Michigan Student Assembly (MSA),
President Jim Alland said the Regents
made a "superb choice."
"Dr. Shapiro is sensitive to the needs
and concerns of the students," Alland
said. "I'm pretty excited about it."
"We look forward to working with"
him in the same way we did when he

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VEGA GUITARS (by C.F. Martin & Co.)
Everything about them says "Martin"
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was vice-president," said Richard Cor-
pron, chairman of the faculty Senate
Advisory Committee on University Af-
fairs (SACUA). He added that Shapiro
had always been candid and helpful in
his association with the faculty.
AFTER SOME of the commotion of
the announcement wore off, Shapiro sat
down to discuss his role in the Univer-
sity's future, and his positions on some
campus issues.-
"I hope that when I'm through as
University president that people will
not say that Shapiro was president
Planning 4
(continued from Page 1)
The preliminary plans call for a 15-
story building to replace the 53-year-old
Main Hospital-the largest of the
medical complex's 12 patient care
facilities-as well as renovations of
other buildings in the medical center.
ACCORDING TO university officials,
the project would assure the Univer-
sity's medical center of a place in the
front ranks of the nation's medical.
teaching and research centers.
The Detroit-based CHPC-SEM agrees
that the old Main Hospital needs to be
replaced, but the council said Univer-
sity plans for the hospital are too big
and too expensive.
The regional health planning council
is a watch-dog agency designed to help
control escalating healthc are costs by
ensuringthatnhospital construction
projects are necessary and do not
duplicate resources found in the same
region.
But the University argued that the
regional planning criterica should not

during those years. What they'll say is
that during those years, here's a
program that flourished, there's a
fellowship for the institution," he said.
"That's what counts in the Univer-
sity. Administrators are just here to
provide those opportunities."
HE SAID as president he "must
provide a style of leadership that allows
the faculty and students to maximize
their potential - a style of leadership
that will raise the being around the
University.
"We can maintain the viability-of the

iew 'U' presiden
University - its size and diversity. precisely to give that rather care
That's what I'm aiming to do. Or I thought and not to think about th
shouldn't say I'm aiming to do. That's alone, but to think about it withA
what I'm aiming the University to- faculty, students, alumni, and R.
wards, I hope. I can't do it alone," he gents," he said.
said. Shapiro, a native of Montreal, and
Until he takes office in January, Canadian citizen, joined the Universi
Shapiro said he would be thinking about faculty in 1964 as an assistant profess
the strengths and weaknesses of the in economics. He received his B.
University, and consulting with mem- from McGill University, and his M.
bers of the campus community and his and Ph.D. from Princeton.
colleagues around the nation. He and his wife Vivian, a clinic
"ONE OF THE reasons I postponed social worker at the University, ha
taking the presidency until Jan. 1 is four daughters.

committee OK's new'1U

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REG PRICE $460
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be strictly applied to the University
Hospital project. The University said
the hospital was not only a community
resource, but also a state and national
resource.
FURTHERMORE, THE University
refused to changeEthehospital plans
during the regional review. The dispute
betweeen the regional health planning
council and the University continued
throughout the summer. Here is how it
developed:
Following a meeting during which it
was determined that the University
was unwilling to scale down its hospital
plans, the regionalrcouncil on April 10
recommended to the state Department
of Public Health that they reject the
project. Regional planners asked the
Univesity to agree to a delay to allow
for a futher review at the regional level.
The University refused.
ON APRIL 22 state officials told the
University there would have to be
reductions in the cost of the proposed
hospital, but also said the project would
not be delayed for further review at the
regional level.
On June 12, state officials announced
they intended to approve the hospital
plans, outlining a list of seven con-
ditions under which the hospital could

be built. The state again told the
regional council the project could notbe
delayed for a second regional review.
University officials had already agreed
to a delay at the suggestion of the state,
but only for the purpose of a state
reviewand not a regional review.
The list of seven conditions for ap-
proval included reducing the proposed
bed complement for the new hospital
from 923 to 900 beds and keeping the
cost of patient care space in the hospital
below $200 million.
THROUGHOUT MAY and-June,
regional planners repeatedly charged
that the University was "politicizing"
the hospital planning, and ignoring

' Hospitali
regional planning concerns:
On June 27, the regional council vote
to bring suit agaisnt the Department1
Public Health to force it to allow it:
second review of the hospital project.
The regional council argued that b
changing the, plans at the state leve
the University was submitting an &
tirely new application for state al
proval of the project, and so the proje
should be reviewed again by ti
regional council.
On July 23, the University's Board
Regents decided to postpone thetarg
date for state approval until October
allowingthe regional council the seco
review that it had requested.a

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student.oi
=Continued from Page
Union from an independent board of
governors to the OSS. This move was
enthisiastically received by students
who had lobbied to convicne the Regen-
ts and administration that the Union

DISCO N' ROCK
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18, 19, 20 YEAR OLD ADULTS WELCOME!
* 550 Capacity
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ntedc Umon
has lost its appeal to students>
Students are being charged a mar
datory fee, about $2.65 per term, k
finance the renovations, Johnson said;
Lebow said some student offices Wvlt
be relocated as soon as a revised floo
plan is finalized. Plans are also under
way to renovate the front desk areaarr
establish an information service.
Room usage policies and the methoa
to select an operations board on whi:
student organizations will be repre
sented will be complete by September
Lebow said.
Renovations will be done "piece
meal" over the next several years j
order not to disturb present program
ming, according to Johnson. An ax:
chitect will be contacted to discus
design of the major physicA
renovations.

11

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During the Week .. .
MONDAY-Pitcher Night & Greek Night
Frat./Sor. admitted FREE
with proper ID
WEDNESDAY-Rock n' Roll, Disco, or
live bands as announced
THURSDAY-Drink n' Drown Night,
rock-bottom prices
SUNDAY-Teen Disco-no alcohol
6-10 p.m.

a

3 -- -- iiniinin m r

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