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October 05, 1979 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-05

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 5, 1979-Page 7.
STATE HOUSE CLE AR THE WAY

Senate may kill

pres. primary

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative Presents at MLB: $1.50
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5
MIDNIGHT EXPRESS
(Alan Parker, 1978) 7&9-MLB3
Heavily criticized for its excessive artistic license (the aestheticizing of vio-
lence, squalor and prison spawned homosexuality or the exaggeration of
Turkish brutality within its prisons), Midnight Express remains, shot-for-shot,
a cinematically excellent film. First-class photography, crisp editing and an
impressive direction of action create a very powerful film; Parker qives his
audiences a terrifying feel for the hopelessness of an amateur smuggler caught
within an alien and repressive society. Adapted from the true story by Billy
Hayes. Starring BRAD DAVIS.
Tomorrow: Coppola's TONIGHT FOR SURE and
DeRenzy's A HISTORY OF THE BLUE MOVIE at MLB

ANSING (UPI) - With what
amounted to a Whimper, not a bang, the
s te House yesterday cleared the way
foz a Senate vote on a bill to scrap
Mthigan's embattled presidential
p gary.
ep. Michael Bennane (D-Detroit),
>e of the staunchest defenders of the
'y ballot, conceded he did not have
I4 votes to overturn passage of a bill
a spring that would eliminate the
or nary.
:he House, without objection from
ciimbers, approved Bennane's bid to
dhdraw his motion to reconsider the
Inination vote. The motion had held
pithe bill's journey to the Senate since
pproval,
4 AWMAKERS have been arguing
M l.ingus
(Continued from Page 6)
b again, although he eventually did.
epper also related the story of how
4gus ruined his career for four
Ors.
RIN 1962 MINGUS became obsessed
┬░ith writing for a big band, and kept
Agmenting an originally small band
Otil there were over thirty members.
ere was little time before the big
and's first major concert; and there
's not enough music. Knepper, who
dn't like the idea of a big band
way, refused to write backgrounds
en Mingus asked him. Mingus,
.wn for his volatile temper, finally
l enough, and "smashed" Knepper,
)cking out his front teeth.
Knepper also discussed Mingus' pen-
ant for self-destruction. "Whenever
was on the verge of success he would
Ssomething, anything to jeopardize
t success ... still he did pretty well
spite of himself."
a at was this self destructive tendency
for, more euphemistically, the refusal
:compromise - that kept Mingus en-
enched in obscurity. He refused to ac-
ommodate himself to "the right
epple" in the music industry, often
*edlessly insulting them. He in
iiated the press and generally made
:ngs exceedingly difficult for himself.
time went on, his reputation became
"bre and more negative, and he was
"garded as a crazy man who was not
farketable.
HIS "CRAZY MAN" image might not
ave been that far removed from the
uth. Throughout the autobiography,
ingus talks about physically leaving
pis body at various stages of his
Aistence and just gazing at himself
om afar. Many times he talked about
^aving his body and his hope for an en-
-ing death.
-Some thought this craziness was very
ial. Larry Coryell discussed the
:mystical aura" of Mingus, and Joni
Mitchell noticed that the day Mingus
'as cremated at the age of fifty-six in
4exico, fifty-six whales beached them-
elves there and were buried by the
1llagers. Mingus himself believed in
is mystical powers, but, Jimmy Knep-
er said, "Hell, there was no mystical
ura ... we tend to glorify our heroes
. there are a lot of Mingus stories
ding around."
We cannot know if Mingus had
iystical power, but he certainly was a
owerful influence on the music and
:ves of many. As he once stated, "I
ever want to become placid. . . I'm
tast trying to play the truth of what I
m - the reason it's so difficult is
ecause I'm changing all the time."
)Tiimmer Donnie Richmond sums up
4ingus best. After the concert Satur-
lay night, asked what would Mingus
hink of the Mingus Dynasty Band were
iestill alive, Richmond replied, "He'd
el us it was ........, but in his heart

ie'd love it."

over the presidential primary issue sin-
ce the start of the fall session two weeks
ago. Heated debate was expected on
Bennane's motion, but none
materialized.
Bennane lashed out at Gov. William
Milliken, who had said he would veto
any measure to require a "closed"
primary - one not allowing cross-over
voting.
Democratic National Committee
rules require primaries in which
presidential delegates are selected to
be closed.
BENNANE SAID he had tried
repeatedly to meet with the governor to
discuss a compromise on the matter but
got nowhere.
"I find his unwillingness to meet un-
conscionable, and. . . believe Gov.
Milliken has done more than anyone to
muddy the issue and kill any attempts
to salvage a meaningful primary,"
Bennane charged.
The Senate late last week approved

another in a series of bills that would
close the primary. The bill currently is
in the House Elections Committee and
indications are it will die there.

must be acted on by the party's state.
central committee.
Milliken earlier yesterday said the
best opportunity for Michigan voters to
express themselves was with an open
primary. He urged Democrats to sue
the Democratic National Committee to
force a change of the closed primary
rules.
"If that is unsuccessful, I would hope
they would select their delegates after
the presidential primary, not before,"
Milliken said.

..:_

I7

'7 f--

t,,. __r ___ *J - _-

I fJnd1 ihs unwillingness to
meet unconscionable,
and . . . beliere Got. Milliken
has done more than anyone to
muddy the issue and kill any
attempts to saltage a
meaningful primary.'
-State Rep. Michael Bennane
MICHIGAN Democrats already have
unveiled a proposal for a series of
cauctises around the state April 26 to
select convention delegates. The plan

John Huston Retrospective 1950
THE ASPHALT JUNGLE
Typical of Huston's naturalistic, yet powerful style, this old-style gangster
film nearly surpassed Scarface or Public Enemy in its startling depiction of
the underworld. A classic crime melodrama of a brilliantly executed jewel
theft, and the criminals whose human failings eventually trip them up. With
STERLING HAYDEN and MARILYN MONROE.
Sat: WOODY ALLEN'S LOVE AND DEATH

ENERGY.
We can't
afford to
waste it.

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
700 & 9:15

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

I

HEYAMA TEURS!

GARGOYLE FILMS
proudly presents
the MARTIML ARTS MASTER
Br'ucc Lee

Soundstage reopens-

By MAYNARD SLEZGO
When Barry Manilow was a little kid, you know, he
probably didn't have nearly the opportunities you've
got to perform for audiences.
Think, for a moment, if old Barry had had local,
amateur coffeehouses at which to work on his act. My
man would be a superstar today!
Ann Arbor now has two amateur coffeehouses: The
Ark, folk music haven, has an open microphone on
Wednesday nights, and now, starting November 1,
University ActivitiesCenter will be sponsoring "soun-
dstage."

SOUNDSTAGE IS A unique opportunity for local ar-
tists to share their creative abilities with members of
the Ann Arbor community," reads a press release.
Last year, Soundstage was free and performances
were held in a Union lounge. This year, admission is
750 for students and $1.00 for non-students, but the ac-
tion has moved to the University Club in the Union. The
big time.
To perform at the regular, Thursday night gigs,
musicians need audition October 8-12 from 2-4 p.m. in
the Union. More information, you future stars? Call
763-1107 and ask for Jenny Schuman or Stephanie
Samuels.

InG... ENTER
THE DRAGON
TONIGHT! Hale Auditorium (BUS. SCHOOL)

7&9 p.m.

$1.50

I

NEXT FRIDAY: DELIVERANCE, 100 Hutchins Hall (Law School)

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