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October 04, 1979 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UMS: Culture on the cheap

I

By MAURA CARRY
Every University student has heard
the chines ringing out each hour from
Burton Tower; while rushing to class.
But what most fail to realize is that in-
side the tower, on the ground floor, the
Univesity Musical Society (UMS) is
bustling with activity ,focused on those
students who have little or no idea of the
society's existence.
Now in its 101st season, UMS is pur-
suing it's annual goal of encouraging
both students and Ann Arbor residents
to increase their cultural awareness.
TO ACHIEVE. this end, the society
sponsors various musical concerts and
dance performances by noted
professionals and international per-
formners. Students also are encouraged
to try their hand at the performing arts
in the Choral Union which each year
presents Handel's Messiah and a con-.

cert at the annual Ann Arbor May
Festival. A 350-voice choir, the Choral
Unikon is open to any student or Ann
Arbor resident.
University junior Geralynn Faust, a
soprano in her first year with the
Choral Union said she joined because,
"I love to sing, and it's a good group
with quality voices. It's probably the
best non-music major group on cam-
pus."
Alto Kay Hannah, an Ann Arbor
resident, said she joined because she
"enjoys singing." She said auditions for
the group include sight reading music
and the repetition of a played piece.
STUDENTS, HOWEVER, are out-
numbered in the group by non-students,
some of whom have been members for
35 years or more.
Gail Rector, UMS president, explains
that UMS enables students to ap-
preciate top classical performances

i

without having to worry too much about
expense. Contributions from alumni
and other sponsors enable the society to
bring internationally-known perfor-
mers here, without having to pay top
dollar for tickets. Prices at Hill
Auditorium range from $4 to $12 depen-
ding on seating, and from $25 to $58 for
a series of performances.
The society's main office in Burton
Tower speaks for itself as to the pur-
pose of UMS. Photographs of artists
who have performed here in the last
century cover every wall, and pam-
phlets describing this year's offerings
fill countertops and tables.
A 1940 UNIVERSITY graduate, Rec-
tor hasebeen with the society for 22
years and became president in 1968. A
former manager of the Boston Sym-
phony, Rector's chief concern now is
the simultaneous entertainment and
education of University students in the

cultural world.
Each week the society offers two of
three performances at Hill Auditorium,
Rackham Auditorium, or the Power
Center. This year's season will begin
tonight at Hill with soprano Joan
Sutherland and her husband, pianist
Richard Bonynge, two of Australia's
greatest musicians. Famous solo
musicians, symphonies, and dance per-
formances varying from classical
ballet such as the "Nutcracker" to the
Gaulin Mime Company, to Chinese
acrobats and Cuban folk danders are
scheduled for this term.
Last year's season, the society's cen-
tennial, was particularlyreventful. Per-
formers from 20 different countries
came to Ann Arbor, and special an-
niversary features included an album
recorded by the University Symphony
Orchestra tohcommemorate the 100
years of the society.

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 4, 1979-Page 7
"A
The Ann Arbor Film Co 'era' Presents at Nat. Si. $1.SO50
Thursday, October4
BICYCLE THIEF
(Vittorio de Sica, 1947) 7 only--NAT SCI "
This early Italian neo-realist film is among the great movies of all time. The
story is that of a poor man's desperate search for the stolen bicycle essential
to his livelihood. Few films have matched BICYCLE THIEF for its integrity
its deep humanism, its social comment on employment and unemployment
it use of non actors, its portrayal of simple human relationships, its highly
successful interpretation of real life on the screen with a minimum of contri
vance and great subtle technical skill.
A BRIEF VACATION
(Vittorio de Sica, 1975) 8:45 only-NAT SCI
Superby acted, skillfully filmed and an exceedingly mature stor of a working-
class woman (Florinda Balkan) in Milan, who contracts TB and is sent to a lush
mountain sanitarium. Beautifully written and directed by de Sica (The G'arden
of the Finzi-Continis, The Bicycle Thief) with an over-all reality and tenderness.
Perhaps his best film. Italian with subtitles.
Tomorrow: MIDNIGHT EXPRESS at MLB

First step recommended in TMI clean-up

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) - The
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
(NRC) staff will recommend today that
the operators of Three Mile Island
proceed with the first major step in
cleaning up the crippled nuclear power
plant, an NRC spokesman said yester-
day.

Metropolitan Edison Co., operator of
the severely damaged plant has builta
decontamination system to remove
radioactive particles from about 300,000
gallons of water.
THE SYSTEM is an early part of a
$400 million four-year recovery plan for
the plant, site of the worst accident in

IHearst buys,
NEW YORK (AP)-The Hearst
Corp. announced yesterday that it had
agreed to buy three afternoon
newspapers in Michigan and Illinois
bringing to 13 the number of papers
owned by the company.
The three newspapers are the
Midland (Mich.) Daily News, cir-
culation 17,000; the Huron (Mich.)
Tribune, circulation 9,300; and the Ed-
wardsville (Ill.) Intelligencer, cir-
culation 7,700.
THE NEWSPAPERS were pur-
chased from Lee Enterprises, which in

state papers
turn had bought, them earlier in the
week as part of a stock acquisition of
Lindsay-Schaub Newspapers.
"We are highly enthusiastic about the
opportunities for these newspapers and
the communities they serve," said
Robert Danzig, vice president and
general manager of newspaper for
Hearst.
"Each has a fine record of jour-
nalistic quality and commitment to its
community. We intend to continue the
staff and general policies that have
built that record."

the history of commercial nuclear
power.
In Washington, meanwhile, NRC
commissioners said yesterday they're
prepared to move quickly at the first
sign of another nuclear accident like
New post
offers
Rabkin
challenge
(Continued from Page t1)
duplication of efforts and to coordinate
those efforts more economically.
At 33, Rabkin is one of the youngest
administrators in the Literary College.
He came to the University in 1970 after
receiving his Ph.D. in English from the
University of Iowa. He became a full
professor in 1977. Rabkin received his
B.A. at Cornell University in 1967.
"PROFESSOR Rabkin has
distinguished himself both as a
dynamic and creative teacher and as a
brilliant and provocative scholar and
has played a very active service role in
the college and University," said LSA
Dean Billy Frye in his recommendation
of Rabkin for the deanship.
"Professor Rabkin's scholarly works
in the area of narrative theory are
widely cited, and he is establishing a
national reputation as a literary
theorist.
"The breadth of Professor Rabkin's
intellectual interests have led to his
seeking intellectual contacts and
stimulation both within and outside his
own department sand discipline," Frye
noted.

Three Mile Island - even if it means
taking control of a power plant away
from uncooperative operators.
The NRC told a Senate subcommittee
that lack of key information and the
inability to correctly interpret other
data hid the true seriousness of the
March 28 accident until two days later,
when most of the danger had passed.

MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTS
THE
PERSUASIONS,

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Players and winners
in rock and roll
(Continued from Page 5)

SING ACAPELLA IN CONCERT
OCTOBER 25 8 PM'
POWER CENTER
ALL SEATS 6.50 AVAILABLE
AT MICHIGAN UNION BOX
OFFICE OCTOBER 4
10A
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tists, the Yipes." Wow. To coin an
Orkan phrase, "Deja vu."
DESPITE THEIR comic strip name,
Wisconsin-based Yipes proved that
they were no Mickey Mouse band.
Away from the record producerswho
stripped all the fun ' and energy from
their recently released debut album,
the group cut loose with their brand of
power pop. Much to my sutprise, they
even got positive response from a
crowd that suffered from acute
catatonia.
After a brief intermission, Saturday's
headline group, Triumph, exploded on
stage with all the force of a long-
delayed bowel movement. Through the
efforts of their sound man, they
managed to recreate that sound for the
better part of the night.
Tremendous on stage explosions left
after-images that the A.M.A. should
know about. Lead singer and drummer
Gil Moore's voice, which suggests that
he spent too many of his formative
years straddling the seat of a ten-speed,
threatened to deafen the audience. Rik
Emmett, lead guitarist, bashed chords
right and left.
THEN SOMETHING remarkable
happened. The drummer and bassist
left the stage. Alternating rock, blues,
classical, flamenco, and comical styles,
Emmett wove a truly memorable ten-
minute solo. Unfortunately, the rest of
the band came back and there was
more noise.
Then it happened again. Triumph
launched into a mellow song called
"The Blinding Light Show." Using a 12-
string guitar, Emmett created a
lengthy solo of incredible lyrical
beauty. The song ended and the concert
closed with more cacophony, leaving
M"TUOZEIi
IN
Jerome Kern & Oscar ammerstein Ii's
FEAURNG
M UEEN '
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the impression that the group was a
heavy metal mistake. Surely, their
calling was in a mellower mode of ex-
pression.
In the game of rock and roll, accor-
ding to the liner notes of, Triumph's
latest album, "There are too many
players and too few winners." After the
performances Saturday night, I can't
help thinking that the Yipes should be a
power pop winner, and that as a heavy
metal group, Triumph should remain a
player.

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