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October 03, 1979 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-03

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, October 3, 1979-Page 9

BLUE WINS WITH EASE:

THE SPORTING VIEWS

Wolverine wom(

F

Student loyalty..

Irish have it

By ALAN FANGER'
IT WAS A WARM, humid evening, quite unusual for South Bend at this
time of year. But that didn't bother the 4,000 fans or so who packed
themselves like sardines into the pint-sized Stepan Center gym. Nope, it
didn't bother them. They loved every minute of it.
Awed and surprised by the size and intensity of the crowd, I turned to a
Notre Dame student standing next to me and asked if the pep rallies were
always this crowded.
"Are you kidding?," he responded. "For the Southern Cal game, most
people never make it into this place."
"But this is the State game," I said. "Don't they consider this to be pret-
"Well, yeah, every game's big here. But this was the first rally this year.
We'll get bigger."
Irish intensity
That fact shocked me, but what happened at the pep rally was even
more amazing. After The Leprechaun, the eternally worshipped Irish
mascot, had fired up the crowd with a few songs and cheers, Irish coach Dan
Devine led his team onto the stage. Yes, sir-every player came to that rally
and every student, professor, and alumnus in that gym was cheering their
heart and soul out for their Notre Dame.
Here at Michigan, we have pep rallies. I guess you could classify them
as pep rallies, but only in the crude sense of the word. Sure, the cheerleaders
and the band and Bo and Bob Ufer are all usually in attendance. And that
warms the hearts of most peopl4 who attend such events. Of course; we don't
have pep rallies before every home game. We probably don't need them that
frequently.
So now you ask, "What makes their pep rallies so special?" How about if
we rephrase that question to read "What makes Notre Dame football so
special-more special than it is here at Michigan?"
First of all, you must consider the context in which football is taken at
each school. At Michigan, most students attend at least one or two games,
and a few thousand loyalists wouldn't miss one to see the Pope. Some die-
hard fans would say that their primaryareason for attending the University
was the football games.
Down at Notre Dame, football is conceptualized in a totally different
,manner. In talking with several residents of a dormitory there, I found that
few people miss even one game in a season. Admittedly, it helps to have the
Spartans, Wolverines, Trojans, Boilermakers, and Panthers shuffling in and
out of town. But there's an element of the Notre Dame football "personality"
which we can't observe by watching the Irish on national television.
Players also friends
Notre Dame players are not required to live with their teammates in
an assigned dorm. Their first two years are dispersed throughout various
halls, and actively mix in with their fellow residents. So the average ND
student actually gets to know some real, live football players. They don't
have to go tripsing through South Quad looking at nameplates on doors, or
peering sheepishly through doorways.,
The game, then, is special to Notre Damers because the players
represent something more than just athletic greatness and a winning
tradition. They're friends-and they're coming to watch them play. If
students were less isolated from the team, many among us would attend the
games not just out of' the desire to "party down." The Notre Dame Stadium
security people strictly enforce the "no bottles or cans" rule, but nobody
becomes despondent over it.
This is not meant to be a condemnation of the attitude toward football
around here. Like a parade, everyone loves a football game. But there's.
more than just the winning tradition of Rockne, Leahy, Parsighian working
in Notre Dame's favor. There's a bond that brings both player and non-
player together. And when those 4,000 fans, many of whom cry during the
playing of their alma mater, raise their index fingers high above them,
they're saying that no matter what happens on the field, whether it be a
heartbreaking loss to Purdue or a thrilling romp over Michigan State, that
their school is always going to be Numero Uno.
Sorry, folks. That just doesn't happen here.

By PETE BARBOUR
"As far as togetherness is concerned,
I think this team is the best," said
Michigan volleyball coach Sandy Vong.
Biased as he may be, the women's
team had their act together last night
as they easily disposed of Oakland
University (15-5, 15-7, 2-15, 15-5).
ALTHOUGH PLEASED with the vic-
tory, Vong said that the Wolverines are
capable of playing much better: Vong
concluded that Michigan played down
to their opponent's level. am
"Sometimes, you will catch a team
when they're not playing up to their
capability. I think that's what happened
to Oakland tonight," he said.
After the first two games, it didn't
appear as if Michigan would have any
problem with the Oakland outfit. The
strong serving of freshman Kerri Ken-
niston, senior Jeanne Sellman, and the
powerful spiking of sophomore Julie
Stotesbury staked Michigan to a quick
2-0 lead.
HOWEVER, OAKLAND came back
strongly in the third game, routing the
Wolverines by a 15-2 count. Shocking as

it might have been to the fans at the
CCRB, the outcome of the game didn't
really surprise Vong.
"I was trying a new setter and I wan-
ted to give her some playing time. I also
wanted to give a couple of other players
a chance to gain experience,"- Vong
said.
Apparently, Michigan came back
with their starters in the fourth game,
regaining the domination they had in
the first two games. Again, Sellman's
strong serving, Stotesbury's spiking
and fine all-around play from Ken-
niston contributed greatly to the
Wolverine success.
OTHER WOLVERINES assisting in
the fourth game scoring were junior
Mary Hoff (served for five points) and
senior Carol Ratza (three points).
The efforts of Kenniston and Sellman
didn't go unnoticed by Vong. "We
usually serve a pretty tough game.
Both Jeanne and Kerri have been ser-
ving well, and-tonight they continued to
do so," said Vong.
Kenniston had a pretty good defen-
sive game as well, but the spiking and
leaping of Stotesbury certainly didn't

en spike
make things any easier for Oakland.
"JULIE STAYED up here all sum-
mer and werked on the weights and it
has certainly paid off. She is one of the
better jumpers in the league," said"
Vong.
Although the Wolverines had things
pretty much their way, according to
Vong, they cannot afford to relax.
"Come Thursday, Western Michigan
will be tougher. Next week we play
Michian State and the week after that
there's state champion Central
Michigan," said Vong.

Oakland
Acknowledging the youth of the team
(three starting freshmen), Vong admit-
ted that it would be difficult for
Michigan to make the regional tour-
nament. But that is the goal he has set
for the team.
"To be honest, I want to finish in the
top two to go to the regionals. With a lit-
tle more playing together, I think we'll
be all right," Vong said.
The Wolverines won't have to wait
long to find out if they're game is in
good shape. As Vong said, they play
WMU at 7:00 p.m. at the CCRB.

PLAYERS FUMING

Big Ten passers
dominate NCAA

COLUMBUS (AP) - The nation's
champion majorcollege passer never
has come from the Big Ten in the 42
years such football figures have been
kept.
But this week that old, conservative
league has three of the top five.
ART SCHLICHTER of Ohio State
ranks first, Mark Herrmann of Purdue
second and Indiana's Tim Clifford fifth
in the weekly National Collegiate
Athletic Association passing figures.
Based on a new, complex passing ef-
ficiency category, Schlichter has a 166.1
ranking, Herrman 157.5 and Clifford
138.7.1
"We conducted a 14-year study of all
quarterbacks since two platoon football
began and their average rating was,
100.0," said the NCAA's Jim Wright via
telephone.,
WHEN INFORMED, Schlichter was
pacing the nation's passers,dOhio State
Coach Earle Bruce opened his eyes
wide and asked: "Have we ever led
before?"
Schlichter said, "It's nice to be in that
position, but I'm not really concerned
with it. I'm only concerned with win-
ning. If.we keep winning, the individual
statistics will take care of themselves."
The 6-foot-2, 200-pound sophomore
from Bloomingburg, Ohio, has been in-
tercepted just once in 62 passes and has
completed 38 per cent of them for 625
yards and five touchdowns.
At this stage last year, Schlichter had
rifled 12 interceptions, five of them in

his opening debut.
"LAST YEAR was a learning ex-
perience for me. I -was anxious. I was
hit a few times. Defenses were more
complicated than high school. It was a
lot of things," he recalled.
"This time we've got a little better
people. We're not throwing into a
crowd. The offensive line has proved it-
self. The line is giving me more time to
throw," said the youngster who led the
Buckeyes to a 7-4-1 record and a Gator
Bowl trip last year.
Doug Donley, a junior speedster from
Cambridge, Ohio, caught 24 passes for
a team-leading 310 yards and three
touchdowns a year ago. Now he has
eight receptions for 168 yards and one
score.
Told of his-buddy's national ranking,
Donley replied, "It's a confidence
builder. We've got a lot more receivers
involved this year than one or two like
last season."
Schlichter, Donley and eighth-ranked
Ohio State's passing wizards try their
new weapon Saturday on visiting Nor-
thwestern in Big Ten play.
NCAA Statistics
Leading Passers

KC dumps Herzog
KANSAS CITY (AP)-Whitey Herzog was fired yesterday as manager
of the Kansas City Royals, a team he guided to three straight American
League West championships.
Herzog appeared pale and shaken moments after walking out of the of-
fice of General Manager Joe Burke, where he received the news.
"They're not going to renew my contract," he said. "They just said it was
for the good of the organizatioan."
Despite his 410-304 record in 41/2 years, it has been commonly known that
the 47-year-old manager frequently was in disfavor with owner Ewing Kauf-
fman. His termination was a subject of speculation even last season.
This year, as the Royals futilely fought to retain their division crown,
Herzog's status became more and more tenuous.
Kauffman requently has voiced disapproval of Herzog's public cric-
ticisms of players.;
An angry Darrell Porter blasted the Royals for firing Herzog and called
it a terrible mistake. Several players echoed his feelings.
"I hope he goes to the National League," said Porter, Kansas City's all-
star catcher. "I'd hate to have that guy managing against me. You think
he'll have any trouble getting a job? He's the best one on the market right
now."
"I know one thing," said third baseman George Brett. "He didn't want
to leave. He loved it here. He's made his home in nearby Independence for
20 years. I don't think he got fired because of being a bad manager. I think he
got fired because there's a conflict between him and Burke or between him
and the owner. I don't think you can find a manager as good as Whitey."
Burke emphasized the decision was solely his own and that he was not
pressured from the top.
Brett recalled two years ago when the Independence townspeople staged
a Whitey Herzog appreciation day.
"I remember Kauffman said that day, 'As long as I'm the owner, Whitey
will be my manager.' Then the first year we lose, he's gone."
The Royals, after leading the major leagues with 102 victories in 1977,
declined to 92 wins last year but still retained their divison crown and lost to
the New York Yankees in the AL playoffs a third straight time. This year,
with a sharp decline in pitching efficiency, the Royals finished three games
behind California with an 85-77 record.
"Here's what his situation was this year," said Porter. "He'd put a star-
ter out there, and the starter gets bombed in the first innings. You gotta flip
a coin and say, 'Do I take a chance and take this guy out and put somebody in
who might be worse?' And then if he decides to go to the bullpen, who's he
going to put in there? He's gotta flip another, coin in the bullpen. He had to
gamble, take chances all year. You put one guy out there and Pope it was his
day. You hope you flipped the coin right.
"How can you expect to win with that kind of inconsistent pitching? It x,
wasn't Whitey's fault. We had no consistency in pitching all year. It was just
a coin toss for Whitey all year.

Att. Com. Yds. TDs

Schlichter, Ohio St.
Herrmann, Purdue
Hippie, Utah St...
Broomell, Temple..
Clifford, lad.......
Hutsell, E. Tenn...
Campbell, Calif....
Kupec, N.C...
Allen, lnd. St._

62
87
87
82
87
104
124
46
76

36
58
54
45
55
65
86
25
40

625
746
699
763
720
797
951
305
732

5
8
6
7
4
6
135.3
4
133.4

Yds.PG
166.1
157.5
147.7
146.6
138.7
138.2
134.4

Uri

SPORTS OF THE DAILY:
Men 's tennis team heads south

Total Offense
Yds. Avg. Yds.PG

Michigan's men's tennis team, which
won its 10th consecutive Big Ten cham-
pionship under Coach Brian Eisner last
May, opens its 1979-80 season Thursday
in Lafayette, Louisiana.
The Wolverines will be competing in
the Cajun Classic, an eight-team event
dominated by southern and south-
western schools. Other teams par-
ticipating include national powerhouses
Trinity, SMU, Texas, and Tennessee,
plus Oklahoma State, Louisiana State,
and host Southwestern Louisiana.
The event is in its third year, and
each year Michigan has been chosen to
represent the Midwest. All team expen-
ses are being absorbed by South-
western Louisiana.
Each squad may bring four players to
the event. Eisner has elected to go with
a quartet of upperclassmen - Matt
Horwitch, Michael Leach, Jack
Neinken and Judd Shaufler - although
freshmen Mark Mees, Louie McKee,
Dan McLaughlin, and Tom Haney are
expected to make large contributions
this season.
Mees, from Zanesville, Ohio, was a,
two-time Ohio Class 'AAA' singles
champion while McKee gained state
laurels in Minnesota. McLaughlin,
from Cleveland, played on the 1979
national champion University School
r prep team and Haney is an Ann Arbor
native.
Scott M. Lewis
Harriers impressive
In their first test in big-time cross
country running, the University, of
Playoff schedule
FrWednesday, Oct. 3
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 3:15 p.m.
California at Baltimore, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4

Michigan's women's team, composed
mostly of freshmen, showed that they,
will have to be reckoned with.
Thirteen teams competed in the
meet. The meet was featured in the in-
dividual run for first place between
'Michigan freshman Melanie Weaver
and Ohio State sophomore Carrie
!Craven.
Craven is rated first or second in the
Big Ten and in the top six in the coun-
try. Melanie and Carrie ran together
for the whole meet until the last 200
yards where Craven beat Melanie by
two seconds. Craven set a new course
record in 17:37 while Weaver finished in
17:39.
Indiana University won the meet,
with OSU second, Michigan third,
Bowling Green fourth, Central
Michigan fifth, Western Michigan six-
th, Eastern Michigan seventh, Nor-
thern Illinois eighth, Hillsdale ninth,
Spring Arbor College 10th, Macomb
Community College 11th and
Schoolcraft College 12th.
BULLETIN
The Pittsburgh Pirates and the Cin-
cinnati Reds were tied after ten innings
of the first game of the National League
championship series last night.
Scoring for UofM:
.second place-Melanie
Weaver-freshman
ninth place-Suzanne
Frederick-freshman
,18th place-Dawn
Woodruff-sophomore
28th place-Annette Penilo-fresh-
man
30th place-Lynn Tudala
-sophoiore
31st place-Sharon Wiggleswor-
th-freshman

second prize-theCy Young Award. ,
"If you look at pure stats, I deserve
it," said Kern,'who then explained why
he didn't think he was going to win the
award as the league's top pitcher.
"Mike Flanagan had an outstanding
year, and they usually. give it to the
player whose team wins the division."
-AP

Luther, S. Jose St............
Wilson, Brig. Young.........
Hipple, Utah St ..............
Hontas, Tulane ................
Venuto, Wake Forest .........
Brown, Apchin. St:..........
Straeter, Tenn...............
Broomell. Temple .............
Schiichter, Ohio St..........
Campbell, Calif .............

1033
761
756,
934
931
911
674
877
864
839

5.7
5,4
6.9
4.9
5.8
5,4
7.5
8.1
7.6
5.2
Yds.
472
351
447
453
118

258.2
253.7
252.0
233.5
232.7
227.7
224.7
219.2
216.0
209.7
Ct.PG
7.0
6.5
6.2
5.5
5.5

Receiving
Gms.
Beasley, Aplchin. St........ 4
Coury; Oregon St..........4
Harp, W. Caro............. 4
Thompson. Utah St.........4
Kirby, Wake Forest ........ 4

Ct.
28
26
25
22
22

AFC Standings
Central Division
W L
Cleveland............... 4 1
Houston ................ 4 1
Pittsburgh............. 4 1
Cincinnati .............. 0 5
Eastern Division
W L
Miami .................. 4 1
New England ........... 3 2
Buffalo............... 3 2
New York............ 2 3
Baltimore .............. 0 5
Western Division

NFC Standings

Central Division
W
Tampa ................. 5
Minnesota............. 3
Chicago ................. 2
Green Bay .............. 2
Detroit ................. 1
Eastern Division

L
0
2
3
3
4

W L
Dallas .................. 4 1
Philadelphia ............ 4 1
Washington............. 4 1
St. Louis ................ 1 4
New York ............... 0 5
Western Division

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San Diego ...............
Denver ..............
Kansas City...........
Oakland ..............
Seattle ..............

W L
4 1
3 2
3 2
2 3
1 4

Los Angeles .............
Atlanta .................
New Orleans ............
San Francisco ..........

W L
3 2
2 3
2 3
0 5

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