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September 29, 1979 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-29

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Page 2-Saturday, September 29, 1979-The Michigan Daily

!1 L

SHIFT TO FIXED ROUTES

Church Worship Services

AATA begings '1990 plan

'-I 1f_,-i ii -i ~mr r a-riita rfi ei r,- -rt1 r fr f,-ir,, ' . [1t=i-irftrl=i rtr,

EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
727 Miller Rd.
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11 a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Thomas Loper, 663-7306.
* * *
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 S. State St.
Rev. Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS
AT ST. ANDREWS CHURCH
306 N. Division
9:00 a.m.-University Study Group.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service with the
Parish.,
12 noon-Luncheon and Student Fel-
lowship.
AT CANTERBURY LOFT
:332 S. State St.
6:00 p.m.-Sunday Evening Medi-

tation.

* *

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic )
.:31 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs. and Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Rite of Reconciliation - 4 p.m.-
5 p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.
4n
if~iilcatl
is preserved on
The Michigan Daily
420 Maynard'Street
AND
Graduate Library

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Rovert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)'
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00, a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Education Asst.: Anne Vesey
* ~* *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Mike Pennanen, Shirley Polakowski
Sunday-5:00-Gathering for Sing-
ing. Meal at 5:30.
Sunday-6:15-Worship Fellowship.
* *- *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENEr
4095S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9: 45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m. Stu-
dent Sunday with "New Jerusalem"
contemporary musical group. 12 Noon
Fellowship.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
Tuesday's 4:00 p.m.-Course. "The
American Evangelical Heritage,"
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School 9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Bible classes for College Students.
For information call 971-7925
Wilburn C. Hill, Evangelist
Transportation-662-9928

AMERICAN, BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
502 E. Huron St. (between State &
Division)-663-9376
Dr. Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service, Child
Care Provided-Sept 30 Sermon: "New
Creations in Christ," guest preacher
Mrs. Cora Sparrowk, President,
American Baptist Churches, USA.
11:00 a.m.-College Class-led by Dr.
Nadean, Bishop.
5:30 p.m.-Sunday Family Night Sup-
pers in Fellowship Hall.
Wednesdays at 17:30 p.m.-Campus
Discussion Group-led by Margi
Stuber, M.D., in the Campus Center
Lounge.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST
CHURCH; SBC
2580 Packard Road
971-0773
Michael Clingenpeel, Ph.D., Pastor
Sunday-9:45, Sunday School; 11:00,
Morning Worship.
Student Transportation call 662-6253
or 764-5240.
6:00 p.m.-Student supper; 7 p.m.-
Worship.
Wednesday, 6 p.m.-Dinner and
Church family activities.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.--662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. College Student Fellowship
in the French Room.
Prayer Breakfast Wednesday at 7:00
a.m.
Bible Study Wednesday at 4:00 p.m.
Theology Discussion Group Thurs-
day at 7:00 p.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHIAPEL
12316 Washtenaw Ave.
Fellowship Supported by the
Christian Reformed Church
Dr. Harry Boer
Preparing your own welcome-10
a.m. and 6p.m.
CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY
Huron Valley Mission
809 Henry St.
668-6113
Sunday Service 2:30 p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus "Ministry of the ALC-LCA )
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.

On Monday the Ann Arbor Transportation Authority
(AATA) will begin using a new service structure based on
expanded route service and the elimination of daytime dial-
a-ride service to the general public.
This new system is a result of a long AATA technical study
and years of often bitter controversy. The study culminated
in the Board's approval of its long term "A990 Plan" last
February.
BOARD MEMBERS said the plan is intended to be more
cost effective and provide more complete service than the
previous dial-a-ride system.
The changes represent a more rapid transition toward
emphasis on fixed routes, but budget constraints have
prevented the total expansion of service envisioned in the
"1990 plan."
Next week is free fare week in order to "allow people to
experiment with the system without being penalized in a
costly way," according to AATA Executive Director Richard
Simonetta.
AMONG THE CHANGES, fares will increase from 35 cen-
ts to 50 cents for the general public, and will be half price (25
cents) for elderly, handicapped, and low income passengers.
Discounts will be available through the purchase of 20 tokens
at 35 cents each, so there will be no fare increase for regular
riders.
The monthly pass, which offers unlimited rides for $10 will
be eliminated. This means an increased cost for those who
ride several times a day, according to Board members and
University lecturer Joel Samoff. But, he added, for those who
ride a few times a week, this change from monthly pass to
tokens is advantageous because tokens can be saved while a
pass runs out.
Fixed bus routes will increase from five to 10 lines, and
service will be availble from 6:10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on weekdays,
and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday. Buses will run every 15-30
minutes. Other changes include:
" Elderly and handicapped dial-a-ride service in Ann Ar-
bor from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Previously the elderly were in-
cluded in the general public.
" General public dial-a-ride service in Ann Arbor from 7
p.m. to 10 p.m. on weeknights, and 8:15 a.m. to 6:15 p.m. on
Sundays. Previously dial-a-ride was available to the public
on weekdays and on Saturday.,
* Dial-a-ride service outside of Washtenaw County on
weekdays and on Saturday:
* One fare for all segments of the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti

system. Previously a second fare was charged for transfer
rides.
" Certification of elderly (over 60), handicapped, and low
income passengers is required to obtain an ID card. For the
elderly this is provided through a doctor or health agency,
and for low income riders through the Department of Social
Services. Previously, a self-declaration system was used.,'
MONDAY'S CHANGES will include a slight reduction -in
the amount of service hours because of budget constraints,
according to AATA Planning Coordinator Tom Hackley.
"We have to plan the system according to the money
available," said Hackley. "The total budget hasn't in-
creased, we have no reserve to draw from, and we have in
flationary costs."
Each year AATA is allocated a fixed amount of federal
money and it! the past a reserve accumulated because AATA
didn't use all of it, according to Hackley. However, last year
Hackley said there was a deficit and AATA used all its
reserve funds which consisted of $300,000-$400,000.
HOWEVER, AATA Executive Director Richard Simonet-
ta said the changes could not be considered a cut in service
because there is no way to make comparisons between the
systems.
"If you cut the hours of service, but carry the same
amount of people, this is not a cut, but a shifting of services to
more productively serve the public," said Simonetta.
Despite its cost effectiveness, some citizens protested the
changes at the board meeting last week.
AATA OFFICIALS acknowledge that four per cent of-the
population are not within "reasonable access" (within four
blocks) of service.
Monica Schteingart lives in the Geddes-Washtenaw area,
near the Huron River and- is among this four per cent.
Blasting AATA, she said she is "very committed to public
transportation and believes it's a basic right of citizens," and
she said she is "being discriminated against."
Another shift in the 1990 plan was the switch from fixed
routes, which Board members said was supposed to be a
"phased" transition. AATA officials, however, decided to
implement one major change instead.
The high cost of phasing was the "driving force in fhe
decision," according to Simonetta. "The authority had' to
realize economies, and it couldn't afford phasing without
drastic cuts in service," he said.
After studying other transit industry experiences, AATA
found phasing is more difficult because it's harder to manage
several small changes than one major one, Simonetta said.

Trust in economy declines

mm"

I

By BETH ROSENBERG
Nation-wide declines in consumer
confidence in the U.S. economy will
continue through 1979 and into the early
1980s, causing lower consumer sales -
especially of cars and other large items
- according to the latest quarterly
Survey of Consumer Attitudes by the
University's Survey Research Center.
The survey showed a widespread
decline during the past year due to
greater public awareness of the
slowdown, in the economy and
heightened fears of unemployment.
"PEOPLE ARE shifting their con-
cern from inflation toward unem-
ployment as the hardest economic
problem facing the nation," said Dr.
Richard Curtin, survey director and
University Economics professor.

"(But) more are concerned with in-
flation right now."
More families reported they were
worse off financially during the May-
August quarter studied in the survey,
while more families said they expected
to be worse off financially in a year,
The study also found confidence in
government economic policies to fight
inflation and unemployment remained
near the lowest level ever recorded.
Buying attitudes towards
automobiles were largely unchanged
from May, but below last year's
leevels. In August, 38 per cent of all
families rated buying conditions good
for cars, compared with 39 per cent in
May and 40 per cent a year ago. Rising
interest rates may have influenced the
figures, the study said.-

Go Ape with Your Camera
in
Photo Contest!.

Daily Official Bulletin

Monday, October t, 1979,
Daily Calendar
WUOM: Marvin Felheim Retrospective,10a.m.
Near Eastern & N. African Studies: John Eilts,
"Reorganization of the Graduate Library and How It
Effects You." Lane Commons, noon.
Architecture & Urban Planning: Chalres M.
Correa, Bombay. India, "Form Follows Culture,"
Chrysler Aud., 4 p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: R. Heinz, U-Indiana. "Early
Results on a Trigger Experiment Possible Obser-
vation of A b-Quark," 2038 Randall, 4 p.m.
Computing Center: Edward J. Fronczak, "In-

troduction to MT:3," Aud. B. Angell, 7 p.m.
General Notice
PRESIDENT'S STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY
ADDRESS. Interim President Smith will give the
annual State of the University Address to the faculty
and staff in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre at 8:00 p.m..
Monday. Oct. 8, 1979. Distinguished faculty awards
will be presented during the program. The Faculty
Womens Club and SACUA will host a reception on the
second floor of the Michigan League immediately
following the ceremony. All members of the Univer-
sity community are invited to attend.

Pap al visit
stats, toda
in Ire land
From UPI and Reuter
DUBLIN, Ireland - Ireland put in
motion yesterday the biggest transpor-
tation operation in its history for the
visit of Pope John Paul II, the only man
who will be able to get around Ireland
easily this weekend.
Nearly every Irishman in this nation
of 3.2 million people, 94 per cent Roman
Catholic, seemed to be planning to at-
tend one of the pope's five major public
masses, so plans to handle the throngs
bordered on the incredible.
Extremely tight security precau-
tions, the most extensive Ireland has
ever seen, were meshed with the trans-,
portation arrangements.
MORE THAN 250,000 Catholics were
expected to cross the border to see the
Pope. Most of them will travel in char-
tered buses and special security
precautions were in force as the first
buses passed through the predominan-
tly-Protestant towns en route to the
Irish Republic.
ALl police leave was cancelled and
extra troops were moved to potential
trouble spots along the border as the
exodus began.
Catholic priests privately briefed the
pilgrims not to display papal flags or
Catholic emblems on their journey to
the border.l
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No.21
Saturday, September 29, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings
during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates:
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-.
side Ann Arbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

Just because you're

PA N A&JVIfl
doesn't mean
we're not out
to get you
U
1

Maybe we should say . . . GET
ACQUAINTED WITH YOU. You are
invited to STUDENT SUNDAY
tomorrow (Sept. 30) at
Iniversity Church of the Nazarene
409 S. Division St.
9:45 a.m. Time of Getting Acquainted
408 Thompson
1:00 a.m. Worship Hour with "New
Jerusalem"
(contemporary musical group)

12 Noon

Fellowship Meal

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

I st Prize: $25 gift certificates from BIG GEORGE'S PHOTO DEPT.

2nd Prize: $15 gift certificate from PURCHASE CAMERA
3rd Prize: $10 gift certificate from PURCHASE CAMERA
RULES
1. Photographs must be black and white only, no smaller than 5" x 7" and no
larger than 11" x 14". Mats and mounts are acceptable. Entries will be
judged on content and overall technical quality.
2. Individuals can submit as many photographs as they wish. Photographs will
be judged on an individual basis. Name, address and phone number must
accompany each photo.
3. Entries must be received by THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard St., no

School and colleges open their doors, their arms to em-
brace, and their "mouths to swallow up" myriads of millions
of children and young people.
"WHAT MANNER OF CHILD SHALL THIS BE!" So said
the people throughout all the hill country of Judea when
John the Baptist was born.
What manner of people will these myriads of millions of
young people now entering schools turn out to be? "And
Jesus called a little child unto Him, and sat him in the midst of
them, and said, Verily I say untoyou, except ye be converted,
and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the
kingdom of heaven.-But whoso shall offend one of these lit-
tle ones which believe in Me. 'IT WERE BETTER FOR HIM
THAT A MILL STONE WERE HANGED ABOUT HIS NECK,
AND THAT HE WERE DROWNED IN THE. DEPTH OF THE
SEA"-Matthew 18:2.
Over seventy years ago a young man sat in a class at a
university and heard an eminent Doctor Professor say

the prominent doctor, for the boy seemed to "smell a rat," or
the odor of hypocrisy and asked himself: "What is he doing
in the church and a prominent officer in his denomination?
Why don't he get out?" For his own profit, and for that of any
he might have the opportunity to influence, later on he
undertook to make an analysis of these two men.
This analysis was suggested by a question God asked
Job-Job 38:4, etc.: 'Where were you when I laid the foun-
dations of the world-when morning stars sang
together-and all the sons of God shouted for joy?" The
younger of these two men was probably in his late twen-
ties: so, where was he just about 30 years before! He was in
his father's loins-rather difficult to Imagine what he looked
like then! 29 years ago he was in his mother's womb;:28 years
ago he was a helpless little baby, unconscious of being alive,
and unable to utter intelligent speech. About 27 years ago he
was still a helpless infant but beginning to say: What's this?
what's that? why this?' why that? etc. Marvel of marvels,
however, for in a little more than a score of years, he Is sitting

I I

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