100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1979 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Hard-to-get tickets
squeeze out students.

How many people

By LEE KATTERMAN
"Can I see your student card?" says
the gate attendant.
The question catches you off-guard.
The best you can do is offer a garbled
"huh?" and think - what's this guy
talking about?
:_"I'LL NEED to see a student
ID .. you are a student?"
,"Oh.. ..yeah.... uh ... I. left it at
the dorm.'
"Well, you'll have to go back for it,"
the attendant says. "Kickoff's not for
,,twenty-five minutes. If you hurry, you
canstill see it."
You are probably saying it can't hap-
pen, right? But according to Dee Strong
of the Michigan State Athletic Ticket
Office, it just might.
"WE'RE COMPLETELY sold out
'(for the UM-MSU football game on Oc-
tober 6)," said Strong. "If someone
buys a ticket outside the stadium, and it
turns out to be a student ticket, they'll
get no sympathy from me if they're
turned away at the gate."
You see, at Spartan Stadium, a
student ticket is not valid without the
photo ID that all MSU students are
issued.
But don't despair. The situation
sounds a little different as described by
STATE NEWS Sports Editor Dave Jan-
ssen.
"They don't have time to check all
the ID's," said Janssen. "If you get
stopped at one gate, justtry another."
JANSSEN WASN'T as encouraging
when asked about ticket availability.
While he expects some tickets to be for
sale from scalpers before the game, he
said that most students would be goipg
themselves or have friends who want
the tickets.
Now if you can get yourself to the
west coast, or even easier, to central
Illinois, a football ticket will be easy

pickins. Neither the California or
Illinois ticket managers expect sell-
outs for their respective clashes with
the Wolverines.
The Big Blue's final out-of-town per-
formance; that is, beside the obligatory
post-season bowl appearance, is with
Purdue's Boilermakers November 10.
As with the MSU game, tickets have
been sold out for months; only the
ingepious or very rich will get into
Ross-Ade Stadium.
Still all this talk of ID's And scarcity

come here
By AL GRABENSTEIN
The total attendance at last
weekend's Michigan-Notre Dame foot-
ball game was a tight 105,111. It wasn't
a Michigan record, but when one con-
siders that the stadium only seats
101,701 spectators the figure gets
tighter all the time. The University of
Michigan ticket office attributes the
difference to non-spectator attendance.
Apparently, the key word here is
"spectator." Fifteen years ago, the
NCAA initiated a policy requiring

anyway?
workers, security and police person-
nel" to be figured into that number.
Gladieux Food Services, which supplies
the various refreshments at the games,
reports they employ roughly 300 people
to serve the munch-hungry fans. That's
a total of 2,300 bodies accounted for, so
far.
The press box attendance appears to
be the most difficult number. to pin
down. Sports Information claims an
average Michigan home football game
will draw 300-400 reporters, technicians
and statisticians: However, a,televised
game like the Michigan-Notre Dame
clash may see up to 700 pressbox per-
sonnel.
The seats taken by the University of
Michigan Marching Band are included
in the original total capacity count and
aren't figured into the excess. What is
left over is made up by the visiting
school's band (if one attends) and both
team's cheerleading squads, not to
mention on the field reporters,
photographers, camera crews and
relay men. Finally, of course, one must
remember the most important
ingredients to the game: some 200
players, coaches, officials, physicians
and trainers.
NO ONE KEEPS an accurate count
of how many extra people are expected
at each game. University of Michigan
Athletic Business Manager Lilyan
Duford explained, "The numbers are
just too large to keep track of."
When asked about the crowded con-
ditions in the Freshman end zone, Ren-
frew said, "By game time there are
about fifty tickets left unsold. . . The
crowding is caused by the dorm
residents arriving at about the same
time."
That's the breakdown and this
weekend should be no exception. Just
sit tight (there's no choice) and enjoy
the game.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 21, 1979-Page 11
TODAY
STARVING ARTISTS SALE
all works by local artists
priced at$15 or less
Thursday, Friday, Saturday L
Sept. 20-22 12 noon to 6 p.m.
at CANTERBURY LOFT
332 S. STATE ST.
second floor, two doors south of Nickels Arcade

C

-1

Fine
Middle
Eastern
foods

: ;, _
- , l
'
1
i

b
A
4
3
fr
d4

I

629 E. UNIVERSITY 4
ANNOUNCES
INTERNATIONAL FALAFIL DAY
SATURDAYS
2Falails, Get the 3rd one free.
(Sorry, no substitutions or variations)
Offer expires October 27, 1979

Fr r
' sw """''"'
A full Spartan Stadium holds 75,433 spectators ... or does it? If you manage
to get a ticket to this year's game, you might want to get your own total.
And don't forget to include those ambulance attendants.

I

NEW HOURS: 11-11 Mon-Sat; 3-9 Sun.
CARRY OUT 994-4962

of tickets could be a lot of hullabaloo.
A close friend and veteran of
acquiring- tickets to many Michigan
away games offers these words to live
and buy by: "As long as you are
patient, you can always get a ticket for
the price you want to pay, so don't jump
at the first offer you see; you'll regret
it."

universities-to report not just the num-
ber of ticket holders present, but a total
headcount of everyone in the stadium,
producing a discrepancy at last
weekend's game of 3,410 people.
SO, WHY the excess baggage? It
seems, according to University of
Michigan Ticket Manager Al Renfrew,
"There are about 2,000 stadium

- _ - -

mwn

SETTER SPURS SPIKERS:
Blue rips Gr
By. JON WELLS
Rhythm and momentum. Those are the key ingredients
of winning volleyball that the Michigan spikers used in
sweeping Grand Valley last night in their best-of-five match
at CCRB.
The undefeated Michigan women (3-0) prevailed in the
hard fought opening game, 15-11. Grand Valley battled back
from a 6-1 deficit and stayed within two points for most of the
game until Michigan shifted into their quick offense. The
Wolvetines maintained the inomentum in the ;-nextwo
games, romping to the tune of 15-3 and 15-6.
"Momentum is the key to volleyball," said Michigan
coach Sandy Vong, "and once a team gets it, it's hard to
break." This fact was underlined last night as the Wolverines
TIE PITTSBURGH FOR NL L
Expos top Mets,
By The Associated Press one out later on Ton
giving the St Louis

and Valley "d>
ERIC'S FACTORY
reeled off unanswered scoring strings of 12 and 9 points. CLOSEOUTS
The Blue spikers run whatis known as a "multiple quick
offense." "The key to this offense," said coach Vong, "is to WARM UPS-
slow down and speed up the pace-vary the rhythm. It keeps 40% off retail prices
your opponent off guard." WOMEN'S
With junior setter Carol Ratza controlling the rhythm, the RUNNING SHOES
Grand Valley team never really gained their balance. Ratza,
the team's "quarterback," according to Vong, skillfully and Puma Tiger ALL S!Zts
consistently set-up the five Michigan hitters throughout the $15-20 closeouts
"match. Jeane Sellmanthe most frequent recipient of Ratza's 4 MkkWoMEWS
passes, led all scores with 12 points. TENNIS/RACBALL
The Michigan volleyball team will next be tested in the SHOES
Renaissance Tournament at Wayne State this Saturday. Bancroft-$10.95
Their next home game is October 2 against Oakland. Brooks-$12.95
SPEEDO
EADBSCORES BATHNGS
LEOTARDS & TIGHTS
combination sets-$9.25
6 3American League 40" Nylon
Minnesota 3,New York IRAIN JACKET-$16.95
Toronto 6,.oto
ay Scott's infield out, Nationa League ALL STORE ITEMS
Cardinals a 2-1 vic- Philadelphia 2, Pittsburgh I
the Chicago Cubs. Montreal6, New York 3 (1st game) -50% off Retail
HMotrea2, New York 0(2nd game) 406 E. Libert
HANDER Dennis St.Louis 2, Chicagol 406 E.k L sey 663-6771
the victim of the Hlouston 7, Atlanta1 2 blocks of f State

. NEW YORK-Jerry White ignited a
four-run Montreal rally in the eighth
inning with a leadoff homer helping the
'Expos to a 6-3 victory over the New
York Mets in the first game of their twi-
night doubleheader last night.
WHITE'S HOMER, his third, came
off Mets reliever Jeff Reardon, 1-2, and
was the only earned run of the inning.
:Phillies 2, Pirates 1
PHILADELPHIA-Manny Trillo's
seventh-inning RBI single carried the
Philadelphia Phillies to a 2-1 victory
over the National League East
Division-leading Pittsburgh Pirates in
the first game of a twi-night
doubleheader.
TRILLO RIPPED a single to left and
Larry Bowa raced home, just beating
the throw from left fielder Lee Lacy.
St. Louis 2, Chicago 1
' ST. LOUIS - Keith Hernandez
reached first on an error to start the
seventh inning, stole second and scored

tory last night overt
CUBS RIGHT-
Lamp, 11-9, was

unearned run, despite pitching a five-
hitter. The Cards' Silvio Martinez, 16-7,
hurled a six-hitter.
Chicago took a 1-0 lead in the bpening
inning on Ivan DeJesus single, a St.
Louis error and Steve Ontiveros' RBI
single. The Cards earned a 1-1 tie three
innings later on singles by Lou Brock
and Hernandez and Ted Simmons' RBI
ground-out.
Houston 7, Atlanta 1
HOUSTON-Run-scoring singles by
Cesar Cedeno and Jeff Leonard and
Darrel Chaney's fielding error sparked
Houston's three-run third inning and
carried the Astros to a 7-1 victory over
Atlanta last night.
Terry Puhl led off the first inning
with a single, stole second and scored
on Jose Cruz' infield hit to stake win-
ning pitcher Ken F6rsch, 11-6, to a 1-0
-lead.

Is
c2.

5

eY

300s

15th
UNI~ON
HAVE YOUEVER HAD TROUBLE
PICKING OUTA BIRTHDAYPRESENT?
Then imagine choosing a present for the third
oldest student union in the country!
The MICHIGAN UNION is looking for ways to com-
memorate its 75th Birthday. Students, Faculty and Staff
are invited to suggest innovative and exciting activities
iLw i w . .....1.1 .z .. . L. a------------a * .l. - a ._ ..

0

Bass 300s:
when you re ready to move up
Ournc I F3 '. n'l i 0collecUi o i is career talored to

DD
a
'
U'
U'
(p
w

SPECIAL OFFERING
$1000 off
Any 10K or 14K Gold Ring
Trade in your
GOLD
high school ring...
on any Josten's College Ring
good $10
for$5100

4'
a4
r'
a'
t'
w
1
.4
c
g
N
P
x
P
e
b
r
i

4

I

£i
1)

4)
4t

SPECIAL OFFERING TODAY!

r

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan