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September 18, 1979 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

Page 10-Tuesday, September 18, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Riccardo to retire

(Continued from Page 1)
statement.
"IT WOULD be most unfair to the
new management and to the employees
of Chrysler if my continued presence as
board chairman should in any way hin-
der the final passage of our request for
federal loan guarantees."
Riccardo said his doctors advised
him to retire immediately after a heart
problem was diagnosed May 18. He suf-
fered chest pains while driving to the
airport en route to a White House con-
ference on tthe future of the auto in-
dustry. He 'was hospitalized for less
than a week, but spent about two weeks

at home after that.
Chrysler turned to the federal gover-
nment after suffering a $207 million loss
in the second quarter. On Saturday, it
revealed its estimate for the entire 1979
loss now stood at $1.07 billion.'
IN RECENT weeks, Riccardo has
been devoting almost all his time to the
request for help for Chrysler, spending
several days a week in Washington.
Iacocca has been taking care of most of
his other duties.
Riccardo said last Nov. 2 he would
recommend to company directors that
Iacocca succeed him as board chair-
man.

Thursday
"In my judgement, Lee Iacocca is
one of the foremost automobile men in
the industry," he said. "That was my
judgement when I brought him in, and
that is my judgement now.
"I AM absolutely confident that un-
der his leadership the company will
return to the position of eminence that
it deserves."
A native of Little Falls, N.Y., Riccar-
do earned a master's degree from the
University of Michigan and became a
certified public accountant. He joined
Chrysler in 1959 as a financial staff
executive.
When Townsend retired in 1975, Ric-
cardo became chairman and chief
executive.

Government lifts ban
on H-bomb articles

Celebrate the
International.
Year of the Child
with
HAROLD S HA PIRO, Vice-president for Academic
Affairs joined by
School Children from the Ann Arbor
Public Schools
and featuring
Dr. Estefania Aldaba-Lim
ASSISTANT SECRETARY GENERAL TO THE UNITED NATIONS, AND
CHAIRPERSON OF THE INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF THE CHILD
SEPTEMBER 20, 1979
8:00 p.m.-RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
The University of Michigan
All events open to children and adults without charge
Problems and Prospects for Children of the world in the 1980's Friday,
September 21 3:30 P.M. PANEL DISCUSSION Auditorium C Angell Hall.
John Hagen, Introductions; Rosemory Sorri, moderator. Participants: Dr. Alda-
ba-Lim, Ms. Beatrice Bonnevaux, Educational Psychology, Dr. Tsuneko Yoshida,
visiting scholar from Japan, Dr. Teshome Wagaw, Professor, School of Educa-
tion and Center for Afroamerican and African Studies.
A01

lI

Iacocca'...
expected to assume top post

E
r

Bolshot Ballet couple

seeks asylum
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Two mem- United S
bers of the Bolshoi Ballet are seeking Kennedy
political asylum in the United States, York.
Los Angeles radio station KNX repor- The Ur
ted yesterday. jet at the
A spokeswoman for the State Depar- Vlasova
tment in Washington said: "We are would n
aware of the situation, we have been in terviewi
contact with the Department of Justice, Union we
the Immigration and Naturalization The in
Service and the FBI." after ar
KNX REPORTED the defectors are tached t
Leonid and Valentina Koslov of the America
Soviet Union, saying the couple sought home. T
asylum before the other members of leave.
the ballet company boarded a charter
airliner for Moscow yesterday.
The radio station gave no details on
how the Koslovs' reported defectionA
was engineered. The Bolshoi troupe
completed its U.S. tour Sunday night in
Los Angeles.se
After Godunov defected, his wife,
Ludmilla Vlasova, was involved in an
extended confrontation between the a

in U.S.
tates and the Soviet Union at
yInternational Airport in New
nited States grounded a Soviet
airport that was about to take
to Moscow. The United States
ot let the jet leave without in-
ng the ballerina, and the Soviet
ould not let her off the plane.
cident ended three days later
meeting in a compartment at-
to the plane where Vlasova told
an officials she wanted to go
the plane was then allowed to
ghanistan
ized; four
ire killed
(Continued from Page 1)
SAID he had the support of the
army of Afghanistan" and
to maintain good relations with
ons, "especially the Soviet
ease strained ties with Iran
istan, and respect Moslem in-
s.
ring to the regime's human
ecord, Amin promised: "All
s by members of the gover-
ill-no longer be tolerated." All
i prisoners "unnecessarily"
will be released, he added.
gime under Taraki admitted it
out 1,100 political prisoners,
reliable Afghan sources said
ber was in the tens of thousan-
-Charkhi Prison on the outskir-
bul, reportedly the scene of tor-
d summary executions, was
about 23,000 persons.

(Continued from Page 1)
tion.
When asked whether he believed
the national security had been in-
jured by the article, Adamson
replied, "Yes, we've been injured."
"WE think this classified secrecy
stuff has gone too far," Andy
Boehm, a part time writer for the Press
Connection, said last night. "And we
figured somebody had to make a
stand."
Both Hansen and Howard Morland,
whowrote the Progressive article, had
contended that the technical infor-
mation on the bomb was readily
available through public sources. Han-
sen said he studies nuclear weapons as
a hobby. His article, 'printed with
diagrams by the Press Connection, was
written in support of The Progressive.
The Press Connection is published in
the same town as The Progressive, a
fact which Boehm explained "goes
back to the peculiar political tradition
of Madison." According to Boehm,
Madison is a "highly political, very left
wing" town, in which what the gover-
nment says "has not been taken as the
gospel truth.
"GIVEN THE general attitudes that
prevailed in this area," Boehm said,
"this is what was expected, and we
delivered. We figured that we owed it to
our readers."
The Press Connection's article was
printed Sunday morning, a day the
newspaper normally does not publish.
The sudden publication was in response,
to the federal government's court order
Saturday prohibiting the Daily Califor-
nian from printing the same infor-
mation by Hansen. Fearing that their
own paper would be next, Boehm said,
"we thought we would beat them to the
punch."

Charles Burruss, an editorial page
editor of the Daily Californian,
described his newspaper's response to
the publication as "one of surprise,
awe, and respect for their courage, and
certainly one of relief." Referrfing to
the Press Connection, Burruss said his
paper "admires their risk, and is sup-
portive of taeir rights."
ALTHOUGH THE Justice Depar-
tment has lifted the restraining order
against the. Daily Californian, the
newspaper's managing editor, -Joshua
Gosfield, said he had not decided yet
whether to publish the letter.
"But it is nice to know the Justice
Department finally came to its senses,"
he said.. r
Adamson said the Justice Depar-
tment's criminal division "will under-
take a preliminary inquiry to' deter-
mine whether any prosecution is p-
propriate for violation of court ordersin
the two cases and the Atomic Energy
Act." He added that there would be no
risk in any future publication of HAn-
sen's information because "it is now in
the public domain."
ACCORDING TO Adamson, the ar-
ticle exposed three critical concepts
dealing with H-bomb construction. The
Progressive and Hansen claim that
these concepts were readily available
to the public, specifically at the Los
Alamos Scientific Library in New
Mexico. The governmentrdiscovered
the mistake and removed the material
from the public shelves.
Some observers felt the gover-
nment's case had been weakened
before the latest developments when
the Milwaukee Sentinel ran a two-part
series on its front pages April 30 and
May 1, explaining the principals of the
bomb.

P"

1'S

il 4,

AMIN
"brave
pledgedt
all nati
Union,"
and Pak
stitution
Referr
rights r
atrocitie
nment wi
politica
arrested
The re
held ab
although
the num
ds. Pul-i
ts of Kab
ture an
holding.

i
i
C
i

(Continued from Page 1)
moving resident.
Residence hall directors agreed that
there seem to be fewer students
requesting room changes than in
previous years.
According to Mosher-Jordan
Resident Director Susan Harris, this
may be because more students are
receiving assignments in the dorms of
their choice. Mosher-Jordan has com-
piled a waiting list of approximately 25
students, but currently has no rooms
available.'
MARKLEY HALL requires students
desiring changes to fill out a request
form, but, according to Senior Desk

Dorm room swaps running
smoothly;_freeze lifted.

Clerk Linda Benson,. resident advisors
discourage changes.
"Changes result in a lot of confusion
for both students and staff," Benson
said. "Mail gets lost and students are
hard to locate. We try, through coun-
seling, to work out the problems that
have prompted the desire-for a switch,"
West Quad Director Leon West said
normally they can work through their
waiting list by early October, but due to
a low matriculation rate, he does not
expect that to be the case this year.
"Kids are staying in school this year.
They seem to realize the realities of the
University of Michigan and are able to
adapt and adjust better to University
life than students of the past," he said.

I

1BetMidrash
COURSES IN JUDAICA
HEBREW FOR BEGINNERS ......... ... Mon. & Thurs. 7:00-8:30 p.m.
INTERMEDIATE HEBREW .......... .... Wednesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.
ADVANCED HEBREW ............ . .. . ... Thursdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.
YIDDISH FOR BEGINNERS ............... Tuesdays 7:00-9:00 p.m.
INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH .......... ...... Thursdays 7:00-9:00 p.m.
HEBREW LITERATURE ............. ... Wednesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.
THE ISRAELI KITCHEN...... . . . . .. .. .5 Wednesdays 7:00-9:00 p.m.
BASIC JUDAISM 0.0................'.... Mondays 7:00-10:.00p.m.
'READINGS IN MIDRASH ..... . . . ...... . . Mondays 8:30-10:00 p.m.
TALMUDBETZA.......................Tuesdays7:00-8:30p.m.
THE 48 WAYS TO WISDOM...... ...... . . . Tuesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.

BRIEF FILED IN OPPOSITION OF WCCAA APPEAL:
Regents defend secret meetings

READINGS IN MAIMONIDES-
LAWS OF REPENTANCE .........

. ... Tuesdays 8:30-10:00 p.m.

WHEN JUDAISM CONFRONTED
A NEW ER A ... ................... ..Wednesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.

THE JEWISH WOMAN:
PERSPECTIVES . . . . . . . . . . . ... .
r ,
s
t 4M
a.t the~ University of Michi.an

(Continued from Page 1
moving the meeting;
" A public body may recess for up to
36 hours and relocate its public meeting
without providing statutory notice,
- ! The lower court's definition of
"breach of the peace does not warrant
reversal, as the WCCAA contends;
- A public body may base admission
to a public meeting upon a search for
weapons;
" A public body should make a "good
faith effort" to. accommodate the num-
ber of people reasonably expected to at-
tend its meetings;
*" The lower court properly granted
judgment for the University on the
WCCAA's counterclaim for an injun-
ction; and
s The WCCAA is not entitled to attor-
ney fees and costs.."
"THE REGENTS are quite willing to
allow the public to observe how its
business is conducted. The question in
this case is whether a group demon-
strating for a cause, no matter how
worthy, can use the Open Meetings Act
to disrupt public business. The answer,
we submit, is found in the uncontrover-
tible notion that without the right to
transact public business, there will be
no public institutions to observe,"
Davis' brief states.
Also in legal defense of the move, he
contends that "under the Open
Meetings Act and constitutionality, it
makes no difference whether the
protester is taken from the meeting or
the meeting is taken from the protester.

If one course is permitted (and ap-
pellant (WCCAA) has admitted as
much), then the other course should be
equally permissible."
In his written argument, O'Brien
said, "If a public body changes its
meeting place from the posted location
- either before a meeting begins or af-
ter a meeting is convened, but recesse
- the meeting has been 'rescheduled'
within the meaning of the act and a
'public notice' of the 'new dates, times,
and places' must be posted as required
by the Open Meetings Act."
THE UNIVERSITY attorney said the
Regents could have restored order at
their March meeting by either massive
police intervention or recessing and
moving the meeting.
"The lower court approved the
passive, non-violent method of ex-
clusion as consistent with the Open
Meetings Act and public policy," Davis
said.
"The purpose of recessing and
relocating is not to evade the Act, but to
exclude those persons who breach the
peace. Any person who breaches the
peace should not even have standing to
complain about insufficient notice of
the new meeting place, as they may be
lawfully excluded anyway," the brief
states.
IN RESPONSE to O'Brien's conten-
tion. that a public body may not con-
dition admission to a public meeting
upon a search for weapons, Davis
responds: "Evidently, appellant (WC-
CAA) contends that the Act requires a

..... Mondays 7:00-8:30 p.m.
REGISTRATION:
Wednesday, Sept. 19, 7:00-9:00 p.m.
and M-F, Sept. 17-21, 9-5 p.m.
1429 Hill Street 663-3336

public body to allow a person armed
with a gun or a bomb to attend a public
meeting, and if that person is denied
admission (or admission is conditioned
on a search), the meeting is 'secret' and
in total violation of the letter and spirit
of the Act."
Judge Campbell's initial ruling in
support of the University was the first
judicial interpretation of the 1977 Open
Meetings Act.
The circuit court record must now be
ordered before the state court hears the
case.
Interim V.P.',
to be n amed
by pres identa
(Continued from Page 1)
Marwil was told earlier this year that
he would not receive tenure at the end
of his two-year term. Marwil, however;
objected to the decision because he was
not given a tenure review, a standard
procedure in such cases.
Although the Senate Advisory Review
Committee (SARC) unanimously
agreed that Marwil deserved a review;
the Department of Humanities of the
College of Engineering, and the Rege-
ts, decided to take no further action in
the case. Marwil subsequently filed suif
against the University.
THE SENATE Assembly reviewed
the possibility of approaching the
Regents again and seeking their inter-
vention in this case. In an unusual
move, the meeting was closed to the
public for 45 minutes as the case was
discussed.
d Among those asked to leave they
Assembly was Marwil himself, not one
of the 68 Senate members, who waited
outside until the doors were reoDened.

HOW-
0
as

r'

T

TEVI WA BOR TH SAE YER A THESWIGUN
TOT 05, O PRETS F MDEATEINOMEAN
EDUAT)NBUEXESIV SOPIS SFUE

--T,

WHILE STEVIE WAS STILLON ALL FOURS, AN ELDERLY
AUNT NAMED MARTHENA GAVE HIM HIS FIRST AND
ONLY GIFT. A SWIPNGLINE TOT STAPLER...
7 SWEAR BY MY TRUSTY TOT, I SHALL
LIVE IN THE MIDST OF NEATNESS
AND ORDER ALLTHE REST OF MY DAYS!
' 13

I 1

STEVIE 8EGANHIS CAMPAlGN AGAINST DiSORDEA
AT HOME.GY THE AGEOF TEN HEEHAD LEO'NEAT*W
CLEAN4 CAMPAIGNS'AC ROSS THE U.S. ANDIN SIX
FOREIGN COUNTRIES.
THE SWINGLINE TOT 50 STAPLES REPORTS
AND TERM PAPERS AND GOES WHEREVER YOU
GO-tTS NO BIGGER THAN A PACK OF GUM!
STAPLE YA
NErSS W ITHTHE t
SW'INN . Fi
e

I

I I

i

i

II

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