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September 18, 1979 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'Pge 8-Tuesday, September 18, 1979-The Michigan Daily
B UMBR Y, SINGLE
Orioles drub

TON HOMER

Tigers, 2-1

I

SLAMMIN'
IT
By DAN PERRIN HOME

U

By MARK MIHANOVIC
Special to The Daily
DETROIT - The difference between
the great teams and the good young
teams is that the great ones make the
fullest use of all their opportunities. The
Detroit Tigers are a good young ball
club, but the Baltimore Orioles once
again showed they are a great team in

their 2-1 victory last night at Tiger
Stadium.
Milt Wilcox (12-8) pitched a fine
game once again for the Tigers, but solo,
home runs in the eighth by Al Bumbry
and Ken Singleton in the ninth were
enough for Oriole starter Scott
McGregor to win his twelfth game
against five losses.

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Bumbry's home run (his sixth of the
season) with two out in the eighth was
only the fourth hit off of Wilcox and
broke up a scoreless game.
Singleton then led off the ninth with
his thirty-fifth homer of the year,
moving him up to fourth place in the
American League home-run derby.
Before the eighth, Wilcox had stayed
out of trouble throughout the game
using his breaking ball'effectively time
and time again.
McGregor was just a little better,
however, as shortstop Alan Tram-
mell'sthree hits were the only offense
the Tigers could muster for the first six
innings. Leadoff singles in the seventh
by Lynn Jones and in the eighth by Ron
LeFlore both went for naught as
McGregor proceeded to retire the sides
in each inning.
However, the Tigers did manage to
bring the crowd of 12,918 to life with a
legitimate rally in the bottom of the nin-

th. John Wockenfuss led off with a line
drive single to left. Lance Parrish
followed with a soft floater that dropped
in center field, moving pinch runner
Kirk Gibson around to third.
Baltimore's Gary Roenicke then
made the defensive play of the game
with a diving catch of a Jones liner in
left field that scored Gibson. After Tom
Brookens whiffed,° Aurelio Rodriguez
fought McGregor hard before hitting
what looked like the game-winning
homer down the left field line. The ball
barely curved around the wrong side of
the foul pole for the Tigers, however,
and Rodriguez swung and missed the
next pitch, ending the game.
Baltimore's magic number to clinch
the American League East pennant is
now three games. Tonight the Tigers'
young Don Petry (5-5) squares off
against the Birds' Mike Flannigan, who
may be the top pitcher in baseball this
year at 22-7.

Middlesworth steps down,
Ex-Libel Miller steps up

By MARK MIHANOVIC
Jim Campbell, president and general
manager of the Detroit Tigers, an-
nounced yesterday that Director of
Public Relations Hal Middlesworth will
retire from full-time duty on October
31st after 19 seasons in the position.
Assistant Director Dan Ewald will
move up to replace Middlesworth, and
21-year-old Bob Miller assumes
Ewald's former duties in the Public
Relations Department. ,
Miller was the Sports Editor of none
other than The Michigan DadY last year
and has worked part-time for the Tigers
in the P.R. Department for the past
three seasons, this year as part of the

scoreboard crew: He graduated from
Michigan with a Bachelor's degree in
Journalism in April, 1979.
"I'm basically doing a lot of the same
stuff I was doing before, but now it's for
real," Miller commented. "The work I
did at The Daily helped a lot, the ad-
ministrative duties of Sports Editor."
those who know Bob Miller would ex-
pect him to be level-headed about the
promotion, and he does a pretty good
job.
"I'm starting a campaign to own the
team," Miller said, only half in jest.
"When I retire, I want to own Tiger
Stadium," he stated. °

Offense sputters .. .
@0*needs a tune-up
W E ALL KNOW Michigan lost a game it should have won last Saturday.
And most of us THINK we know WHY the Wolverines didn't conquer
the underdog Irish of Notre Dame. But few of us really know what the
problems were and fewer yet can step forward and offer solutions at this
crucial point in time.
What we do know is the Blue gridders played a tremendous first half,
both offensively and defensively, and walked off the field leading 10-6. We
also know the defenders consistently came up with the big play throughout
the second half of the game, while the attackers faltered time and again,
failing to score a single point after intermission.
With the above facts in mind, we can assume the offense, or lack of it,
was to blame for the 12-10 defeat, Schembechler's first regular season loss to
a non-conference team since Dan Devine's Missouri Tigers routed Michigan,
40-17, in 1969.
After taking a closer look at the problem, we can cast our eyes on the
giants who toil on the offensive line as those most likely responsible for the
second half lapse.
Michigan Coach Bo Schembechler is inclined to agree, but he insists
things aren't as bad as they seem.
"The film looks a lot better than the game," Schembechler announced at
the weekly Weber's Inn luncheon yesterday. "I'm surprised they (the
linemen) did that well.
"The offensive line played pretty well from tackle to tackle," continued
the Michigan mentor. "They played well enough to win. (But) when we did
miss a block, it was usually crucial and ended up stopping the play. At
critical times downfield, ten guys would block and one guy would let down
andehis man would make the play. The breakdowns came at the wrong
time.";
Of course, there are others who are at fault - specifically the kickers.
Senior walk-on Bryan Virgil failed miserably to convince the 105,111 fans he
has the tools to be a Big Ten kicker. Although he did manage to hit a 30-yard
field goal early in the game, giving Michigan a 3-0 lead, his punting was less
than dazzling.
Kicking game woeful
Virgil punted seven times for 208 yards and a mediocre 29.7 yard
average, hardly the stats of a major college kicker. Most disheartening
were the five, ten and twenty-yarders Virgil booted deep in Wolverine
territory. His poor performance gave the Irish good field position numerous
times, leading to a pair of Chuck Male three-pointers in the third quarter, the
last of which proved to be the game winner.
Schembechler knows the kicking game leaves much to be desired and
plans to emphasize that this week.
"The difference in the game was kicking," Schembechler smartly ob
served. "It's going to require a lot of work. It's a matter of emphasis.
Repetition is the name of the game. But we have to be careful not to de-
emphasize other areas."
Schem~nbechler hit the spot with that last remark. The last time a
Michigan team over-emphasized a certain phase of the game, they were
soundly whipped by an upstart Michigan State squad. Bo harped onstopping
the pass so much, the defense forgot to stop the run. The result: a 24-15 upset
last season, MSU's first win over Michigan since 1969.
So, Bo must be extremely careful when preparing.his troops for the up-
coming clash with the Kansas Jayhawks. Michigan football fans have come
to expect one letdown a year from the highly-respected gridders, but two in
one season, especially two in a row, would be unforgivable.
Fortunately, the past provides hope for the future. Michigan has lost one
regular season game each of the last three years. And the Wolverines have
abused their opponents the week following the defeats.
Re boun d inerjable
In 1976, Purdue upset the Maize and Blue at West Lafayette, 16-14.,
Michigan rebounded a week later with a 38-7 shellacking of Illinois. In 1977, it
was Minnesota's turn to play the role of the spoiler as they shut out the
Wolverines, 16-0. This time, the Blue gridders bounced back with a 23-6 win.
over Iowa. And in 1978, the MSU Spartans rolled over Michigan, 24-15. The
next week at Madison, the Wisconsin Badgers suffered mightily as the
Wolverines swamped them 42-0.
All three years, Michigan lost a single conference game, yet allthree
years, they still made the trip to the Rose Bowl. This year they lost a NON-
conference game early in the season. With the next Big Ten clash, versus
MSU at East Lansing, three weeks away, Schembechler feels there is plenty
of time to renovate the offense and produce a consistent winner.
"I might remind you that both USC and Alabama got beat early last
year," proclaimed the smiling coach. (Both were crowned national cham-
pions, by UPI and AP, respectively, at the end of the year.)."I think we're
going to come back.
"It's a matter of coming back and improving our offense, playing the
same type of defense and improving the kicking game," added Schem-
bechler.
. How does the Wolverine coach expect to upgrade his squad?That's a
good question. One thing not to expect is any major positional changes.
Even though senior quarterback John Wangler came in with two
minutes left and almost won the game singlehandedly Saturday, Schem-
bechler hints he'll continue to start junior B. J. Dickey, who fared well in
the opening half, but who lost his momentum after halftime.
"The quarterback situation is the same," explained Schembechler. "No
question Dickey had a bad second half. The breakdowns hurt him, too, and
made him look bad. I'm not down on Dickey, not after that game. I'm just
going to improve him. It doesn't necessarily mean we'll make changes."
As for the disastrous kicking game, Bo spit out probably the best
suggestion of the day when he said, "I'll kick myself."
Whatever happens, Schembechler promises, "We'll have a pretty good

offensive team by the time we get done (the end of the season.)"
Let's just hope, for the sake of all involved, that the Wolverines get it
together sooner than that. If they wait much longer, it will be too little, too
late.

MAJOR L EA GUE ROUNDUP:
Pirates dump Expos

By The Associated Press
(Pirates 2, Expos 1
MONTREAL - Dave Parker stroked
a pair of run-scoring singles and Don
Robinson tossed a six-hitter to pace Pit-
tsburgh to a 2-1 victory oyr, tf Mon-
treal Expos last night and move the
Pirates a full game ahiadot Montreal'
in the-National League East.
Blue Jays 5, Red Sox 4
TORONTO - Rick Cerone doubled
home two runs in the bottom of the nin-
'th, as the Toronto Blue Jays defeated
the Red Sox 5-4/in the opener of a twi-
night doubleheader yesterday.

Jesse Jefferson, 2-10, got the victory
with 1% innings of one-hit relief.
Butch Hobson erased a 2-1 Toronto
lead in the fourth with a two-run homer
off Butch Edge.
Indians 5, Yankees 1
CLEVELAND - Rick Waits pitched
a five-hitter to help the Cleveland In-
dians snap a five-game losing streak
with a 5-1 victory over the New York
Yankees in the first game of a twi-night
doubleheader last night.
The Cleveland left-hander, 15-13,
fired his eighth complete game of the
season. Yankees starter Jim Beattie, 3-
6, took the loss.

' B

Major League Standings

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(Not including last night's game)
AMERCAN LEAGUE
East

Baltimore.
Milwaukee ....
Boston ......
New York.
Detroit.....
Cleveland .....
Toronto.....

W L
97 50
87 62
82 64
80 66
86 69
74 74
49 99

Pct.
.660
.584
.562
.584
.537
.500
.331

GB
11
141/
16%/
18
23%/
48%/

California .....
Kansas City .. .
Minnesota ....
Texas ........
Chicago.......
Seattle......
Oakland ......

West
81
78.
77
74
65
63
52

69
71
72
76
83
87
98

.544
.523
.517
.493
.439
.420
.347

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Montreal ......
Pittsburgh ....
St. Louis ......
Philadelphia ..
Chicago ...... .
New York ...
Cincinnati.....
Houston .......
Los Angeles ...
San Francisco.
San Diego.....
Atlanta .......

East
W
87
88
78
76
74
56
West
85
82
71
66
62
59

L
57
58
68
72
73
89
61
66.
78
84
87
88

Pct.
.604
.603
.534
.514
.503
.386
.570
.554
.477
.440
.416
.401

3
4
7/
15/
181/
291/2
GB'
10
13
14%
31%
2%/
14
191/2
23
25

i.

itrk

AIR FORCE ALWAYS
SNEEDS MORE LEADERS.

Understanding
filed by Rose
CINCINNATI (AP) - An "amicable,
private understanding" has been filed:,
in the divorce case of Philadelphi
Phillies first baseman Pete Rose and5
his wife, Karolyn.
The agreement replaces last week's,1
order from the Hamilton County Court:,
of Domestic Relations awarding Mrs.
Rose $3,500 per week. However, terms
of the agreement were not revealed.
The court entry indicated that the un-
derstanding applies to financial,
custodial and visitation matters.
Mrs. Rose charged "gross neglect of
duty" in the suit, which was filed Sept..
11. The couple had been married for 16
years.

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