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September 18, 1979 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-18

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Page 2-Tuesday, September 18, 1979-The Michigan Daily
WALKOUT WOULD CAUSE'IRREPARABLE HARM':

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Judge won't issue work order

From United Press International
A judge refused yesterday to order
striking Detroit teachers back to work
despite a plea from school officials that
the week-old walkout will cause
"irreparable harm" to the city's 213,000
students if allowed to continue.
Elsewhere in Michigan, some 6,000
teachers in 12 other school districts
were still on strike, keeping more than
115,000 students on summer vacation.
STRIKEBOUND districts were
Albion, Benton Harbor, Bloomingdale,
Chippewa Valley, Flint, Kelloggsville,
Lansing, Melyindale-Northern, Allen
Park, Montague, Oxford, Saginaw and
White Pigeon.
Tentative contract agreements were
reached yesterday to end teacher
strikes in Holland, Holland West Ot-

tawa, Lansing Waverly and Ferndale.
Officials in the Chippewa Valley
district in Macomb County reported
major progress towards settling their
strike.
Over the weekend, tentative
agreements were reached to end
strikes in the Wyoming and Owosso
districts.
TEACHERS IN Marshall returned to
their classrooms yesterday without a
contract agreement. However, both
sides agreed to continue bargaining
sessions of 12 hours daily until
agreement is reached.
The Michigan Education Association
(MEA) said a tentative contract
agreement also was reached in Han-
cock. The settlements still leave 146
MEA locals covering just-over 18,000

teachers without new contracts.
In Detroit, Wayne County Circui
Judge Patrick Duggan rejected the
school board's motion for a back-to-
work order and instead directed both
sides in the dispute to report to him
later in the day on the progress of thei:
negotiations.
SCHOOL BOARD attorney Theodore
Sachs said the judge apparently wanted
a progress report "on the state o
negotiations ;and - the parties'
positions," but declined -further com
ment.
Talks between the 12,000-membe
Detroit Federation of Teachers and the
Board of Education broke down Satur
day night. State mediator Rober
Blackwell said the two sides found them
selves in "a classic stalemate."
Blackwell and Superintendent Arthu
Jefferson both said they hoped talk
would resume early this week.

Baker: Time is running out for Carter
stand against Soviet troops in Cuba
DETROIT (UPI) - Senate "I THINK THE only thing the
t Republican leader Howard Baker president can't do is nothing," the
e said yesterday "time is about to Tennessee Republican told a news
run out" for President Carter to- conference. "He has to take firm,
h take a "firm and direct stand" on positive steps. He has to make it
the presence of Soviet combat clear what the American position
r troops in Cuba. is. I have not yet seen that.
Baker declined to specify the "The president still has some
e type of action Carter should take, time, but just a little."
d however, saying he had agreed to Baker also said he cannot sup-
f withhold specific comment until port the SALT II agreement in its
the president had a "reasonable present form because it gives the
- period of time" to act on the mat- Soviet Union a strategic edge over
ter. the United States.
r "BUT TIME is about to run out,'' "I WOULD like to vote for a
e Baker told reporters prior to ad- treaty that is amended to remove
- dressing the Economic Club of the distinct advantage in favor of
t Detroit. "I fervently hope the the Soviet Union," he said.
ni president will take a strong and Baker has been actively, cam- Baker . .
determined stand on this subject. paigning for president for some "
r "There is the danger that this time, but said he expected to for- "rm a
s matter will degenerate into just mally announce his candidacy for Baker said a steady, persistent
another diplomatic squabble and the GOP nomination in foyr to six slowing of the growth of the money
we can't let that happen," he said. weeks. He said he planned to enter supply and reductions in the
"The president must take a firm all the primaries. federal budget are required to beat
and direct stand soon." He also said he expected Sen. inflation.
Baker termed the troops' Edward Kennedy, (D-Mass.), to "President Carter campaigned
presence a challenge to Carter's become an active presidential on the pledge of a balanced federal
presidency "just as John Kennedy candidate, noting "what he has budget in fiscal 1980, but since
had been challenged and every said so far is tantamount to an- January 1977, the administration
president since John Kennedy has nouncing." has preached more than it has
been challenged by the Soviet IN REMARKS prepared for practiced restraint in federal
Union." delivery to the economic group, spending," he said.
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LS&A SCHOLARSHIPS
LS&A Scholarship applications for winter 1980 will be
available in 1220 Angell Hall beginning Sept. 14, 1979.
To qualify for scholarship consideration, a student must be an
LS&A undergraduate and have attended the University of
Michigan for at least one full term. Sophomores must have a
U of M grade point of 3.7 or better and Juniors and Seniors
must have a GPA of at least 3.6. The awards are based on
financial need and on academic merit. Completed applica-
tions must be returned to 1220 Angell Hall by October 12.

ENERGY.
We cant afford
to waste it.

ti,..

Judge bars state court
intervention in Indian treaty
GRAND RAPIDS (UPI) - A federal Fox said that because the mode of
judge ruled yesterday Michigan courts fishing has been continuous with "no
have no right to intervene in Indian break in that aboriginal right" the state
treaty right matters. of Michigan, either formally or through
U.S. District Judge Noel Fox issued a any of its citizens, has no right to tam-
permanent injunction barring a Grand per with it.
Traverse County Circuit Court judge THE RULING effectively blocks con-
from hearing any evidence in a class tinuation of a suit filed by the Grand
action suit brought by a group of sport Traverse Sport Fishing Association
fishermen seeking to bar gill net fishing which asked Grand Traverse Circuit
in Grand Traverse Bay. Judge Charles Forster to block con-
ATTORNEYS representing the tinued gill netting in Grand Traverse
Grand Traverse judge and the sport Bay.
fishermen said they would appeal. y The sport fishermen argued that con-
"The Indians from 10,000 years tinued gill netting will wipe out the
before Christ were in this very territory bay's lake trout population and that un-
and fishing was their way of life," Fox der the Michigan Environmental
said angrily. "By the time of Jesus, Protection Act any citizen can sue any
they acquired the gill net technique. other citizen he feels is harming the en-
That has been their primary way of vironment.
fishing all the way down from the time Fox said the law is inapplicable as far
of Jesus to this very day." as Indian fishing is concerned.
Daily Official Bulletin

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1979
Daily Calendar:
Extension Service: Eastern ssessors Short Course,
Rackham, 8:30 a.m.
Computing Center: Chalk Talks, "Introduction to
MTS, 1011 NUBS, noon.
Bio-Engineering: Joachim F. Sieger, "Computer
Tomography," 1442 E. Eng., 4 p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: E. R. Choen, Rockwell Inter-
national Science Center, "Status of The Fundamen-
tal Constants," 2038 Randall Lab., 4 p.m.

Computing Ctr.: James Bodwin, lecture on new
ALGOI6W. Compiler, 3016 Frieze, 7:30 p.m.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume LXXXX, No.1
Tuesday, September 18, 1979
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings
during the University year at 420
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109. Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
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mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer
session published Tuesday through
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pid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
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Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

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