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September 14, 1979 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-14

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 14, 1979-Page 9

Dark times dim Detroit's Renaissance:
strikes, Chrysler problems p lague rebirth

WALT DISNEY'S 1949
PINNOCH 10
The Disney Studio's next project after "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs."
With Jiminy Cricket, the Blue Fairy, Jepetto the puppet maker and that Disney
theme song, "When You- Wish Upon A Star." Classic animation. Short:
THE DOODLERS (Kathy Rose-1973} A whacky film whose creator envisions
her drawing coming to life.
FRI: Truffaut's SMALL CHANGE

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DETROIT (AP)-These are not the
rosiest of days for this self-proclaimed
Renaissance City.
Its 12,000 teachers are walking picket
lines.
The world's largest carmaker,
General Motors Corp., headquartered
here, faces a strike deadline at mid-
night tonight.
AND CHRYLER Corp., the city's
largest employer, is threatened with
economic disaster.
But even with all that, leaders in this
city of 1.2 million do not predict doom.
"I've seen this community more
down on its knees than it is now. We
have problems, but I'm confident we
can overcome them," says Walter
Douglas, president of New Detroit Inc.,
a coalition of business and civic of-
ficials trying to rekindle Detroit.
DETROIT'S WORST times came af-
ter its 1967 riot-the nation's worst ur-
ban riot. For the next decade, as crime
figures soared, critics referred to
Detroit-once the "Motor City"-as
'Murder City."
Then, with Ford Motor Co. Chairman
Henry Ford II providing the impetus,
the city began to rebuild. Ford's prop-
sal for the Renaissance Center-and his
attracting more than $300 million in
private money to pay for it-became
the centerpiece of the city's rebirth.
The effort to bring back the city
reached its culmination this year when

it was chosen as the site of the 1980
Republican National Convention.
The leaders of Detroit's revitalization
movement see the teachers' strike and
the impending strike against GM as
just "temporary setbacks."
"THESE THINGS come around
every three years and we take them in
stride," said Tom Boyle, a spokesman
for Renaissance Center, the gleaming
glass and steephotel-office complex.
"But," he said, "the Chrysler situation
has the potential to be much more
serious."
Detroit's concern over Chrysler's
financial problems. was supported in a
U.S. Department of Transportation
report released this week. The analysis
predicted Chrysler's collapse would
double area unemployment, increase
racial tensions and reduce city tax
ellections by $34 million a year.
The unemployment rate is certain to
jump soon as a result of Chrysler's
promise to close its Dodge Main
assembly plant within a year, idling
6,500 workers.
"Any shift or adjustment downward
in local tax revenues because of strikes
or Chrysler's closing would indeed un-
dermine the efforts" to renew the city,
said New Detroit's Douglas.
And Alice Lyte of the Semi-Quiois
Youth Center said the teachers strike, a
GM walkout and potential Chrysler
downfall could slow progress even
more in the city's neighborhoods.

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Daily Photo
DETROIT'S ECONOMIC health, worsened by strikes and Chrysler's finan-"
cial woes, fails to match the gleaming Renaissance Center, the construction
of which symbolized the city's rebirth.

RSG asks administration

By ADRIENNE LYONS
Rackham Student Government
(RSG) has asked the graduate school's
executive board for cooperation in for-
ming a new student, faculty and ad-
ministrative committee to examine the
tenure process at the University.
RSG members said information on
* tenure procedures currently is
inadequate and not readily available.
"It's not that the University failed, but
that there isn't much information,"
said RSG member Susan Van Alstayne.
. "What we're proposing is some kind
of inquiry into the tenure process," said
RSG President Robert Milbrath.
In a letter to Rackham Dean Alfred
o: Sussman, RSG cited concern over a
r lack of information about the Univer-
sity's tenure, promotional, and affir-
Cii mative action policies.
RSG member Carol Yorkievitz said
' she supports formation of the commit-
3f, tee, "because of the way the University
fr, collects statistics; it's difficult to find
lea FRASER OPTIMISTIC AS.
[;~

progress rates of certain departments
and the arbitrariness of the decisions."
RSG suggests in the letter to Sussman
and the 16-member Rackham
EXecutive Board, that the new commit-
tee address itself to tenure-related
issues including:
. The way in which teaching, service,
research and advising functions are
weighed and evaluated;
" The manner in which new faculty
members receive tenure;.
" Conducting evaluations and
keeping records;
" Inconsistencies in tenure policy
between departments;
" Solicitation and use of student input
on tenure policy
" The availability and adequacy of
statistics on affirmative action
programs.
Milbrath, however, said RSG's at-
tempt to gain the executive board's
help with the project may be futile.
"I think the graduate school is reluc-

for panel to study tenure,
tant to get involved," he said. "The big student interest."
deal is whether student groups can get Because tenure statistics are
involved and tell the faculty who they unavailable, RSG members said they
can give tenure to. doubt the effectiveness of University
"We feel other groups should have affirmative action programs.
input, particularly students," Milbrath "There are some statistics that are
added. not as available, not as clear-s they
Most members of the board were should be, because they lump people
unavailable for commet yesterday, together," said Yorkievitz. "They
but Law Prof. Joseph Sax said he had aren't separated according to race and
glanced briefly at the RSG letter. The sex."
executive board's first meeting is
scheduled for next week, but Sax, a new
board member, said he did not know if
the issue would be addressed.
Van Alstayne said she believes an
important tenure issue is that of incon- Classes Forming
sistencies between departments in For Oct. 13th and
tenure procedures. "Are tenure policies
consistent across departments?" she Dec. 1st LSATs
said, adding that inconsistent policiesC
raised further questions "in terms of CALL 1-261-LSAT OR WRITE:
equity." rUniversity LSAT Preparation Service
equit." i33900 Schoolcraft Road,
Van Alstayne added, "The policies Suite G-2
are illegitimate. They don't reflect Livonia, Mi;higan 48150

.Wonderfully zany! PI
-New York Daily News
"A sparkling comedy! '
-San Francisco Chronicle
"A zany comedy
of brilliant wit."
-Boston Globe
"Hilariously funny
and superbly performed
down to the tiniest details.
Cosmopolian
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RA f &,X fiJ(, l [

NOW °
SNOWING
AT TH E
MOVIES "
AT
BRIARWOOD.
10:00
12:45
3:00
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9:15
FRI & SAT
12:00 Midnight
UBTITLES R

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Marathon UAW negotiations begin

=rg
DETROIT (AP)-The-
Workers (UAW) uniona
Motors Corp. began

United Auto
and General
marathon

bargaining on, a new company
r economic proposal yesterday, 30 hours
before the union was to strike the
nation's largest carmaker.
UAW President Douglas Fraser said
it was possible the negotiators could
take a break for sleep ",if the momen-
tum isn't there." No details of the com-
pany proposal were made public.
"IT WOULD BE a shame if we let it
get away from us now," Fraser said.
"The differences between us look like
they can be resolved with some inten-
sive negotiations. We're just going to
stay at the bargaining table."
Fraser said he had spent "a lot of
hours" with GM's chief negotiator, Vice
President George Morris Jr., in recent
days. The subject of their talks was
. unknown, although union spokesman
Don Stillman said later the two had not
been negotiating.
s Major issues in the talks are protec-
tion of retired workers against in-
flation, more paid time off and wages.
Contracts for the 780,000 Big Three
autoworkers expire at 11:59 p.m.
tonight.
EARLY IN THE talks, the company
offered three per cent annual wage in-
creases for the next three years, plus
continuation of the present cost-of-
living formula.
That formula has added $1.37 an hour
to automaker wages over the last three
years, bringing average straight-time

pay for GM's UAW members to $9.05
per hour. The formula and wage in-
creases negotiated in 1976 have kept ac-
tive autoworkers, unlike their retired
colleagues, between five per cent and 6
per cent ahead of inflation.
The "paper's still flying, UAW
spokesman Howard Lipton said yester-
day, indicating progress was being

made in the final hours before tonight's
11:59 p.m. deadline.
If no contract can be reached for
UAW members at the nation's largest
carmaker, the union hassaid it will
strike 46 of GM's 130 installations-13
assembly plants, a locomotive plant
and 32 parts warehouses.

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The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative
Prsents at MLB $1.50
Friday, September 14
(Elia Kazan, 1954) EAST OF EDEN 7only-MLB4
Kazan once said, "Never direct a natural." Surely he meant it when he made this modern
version of the Cain and Abel story set in the farming country of pre-WWI Northern California.
The natural in this case was James Dean, who performs with great power in a timeless tale
of fathers and sons. Based on the novel by John Steinbeck. With RAYMOND MASSEY, JULIE
HARRIS, BURL IVES.
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE
(Nicholas Ray, 1955) 9 only-MLB 4
From the opening credits, where Jim Stark (JAMES DEAN) plays like a child in the gutter with
a toy monkey, to the summit ending where Jim the man declares an end to the madness
around him, the fikn taps all the inexpressible, private feelings every American teenager
has felt for the last 25 years. This is one film that can be called a masterpiece, with a per-
formance by Dean that rocketed him into the realm of myth. A sterling supporting cast
includes NATALIE WOOD, SAL MINEO, DENNIS HOPPER, and JIM BACKUS.
Plus: JAMES DEAN INTERVIEW (1955). Scenes from an early TV role precede Dean's
interview with Gig Young.
Tomorrow: Woody Allen's BANANAS and WHAT'S UP TIGER LILY? at MLB
Membership applications ore being accepted, torms
available at all Ann Arbor Film Coop Screenings
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