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September 14, 1979 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

University Hispanics celebrate national
week with orientation at Markley dorm

The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 14, 1979-Page 5
SIDDHA YOGA DHAM

By JULIE BROWN
While first year students suffer
through "las preguntas" of introduc-
tory Spanish, more than 400 Hispanic
students must grapple with the more
difficult questions facing minority
students at the University.
To increase support among Hispanic
students, several University
;.organizations are sponsoring an
Hispanic student orientation tonight at
6:30 p.m. in the Markley North Pit.
"IN-BRINGING minority students tot
he University one of the things sought is
to make them feel welcome," said
Michael Garcia, program assistant for
minority concerns of the University's
,Affirmative Action Program.
"Their (Hispanic students') meeting
-with other students and with staff is

important, as well as their knowing that
the University is a multi-ethnic com-
munity," he added.
Garcia said Hispanic students often
face special problems at the Univer-
sity.
"I THINK it is cultural shock, the
weather, the pace of life, the rigor of
school work," he said. "For any student
coming here, there is a certain adap-
ting. Added to that is the cultural adap-
tation."
The orientation is co-sponsored by the
Office of the Vice-President for Student
Services, the Housing Office's Special
Programs division, the Office of Ethics
and Religion, the Coalition for the Use
of Learning Skills, and the Office of
Minority Student Services.
"It's a chance for non-Hispanic
students to get acquainted with us,

too," said Margarita Torres, Hispanic
representative of the University's Of-
fice of Minority Student Services. "It's
advantageous during an informal
meeting to learn more bout each other
through conversations and through
listening to music."
TABLE DISPLAYS will be set up at
tonight's orientation, where Hispanic
students will be able to learn of services
available to them, Torres said.
Following the orientation session, a
dance vWll be held with music provided
by a Mexican-American band.
Torres said a similar program, at-
tended by 300 person, was held last Sep-
tember and as a result, many Hispanic
students met and formed study groups.
"We do want the whole Hispanic
community, because they help each
other," she said. "A sense of com-

munity is needed. One of our goals is to
unite Hispanic students. You
sometimes find that Chicanos do not
mix with Puerto Ricans, one group with
another."
ACCORDING TOthe Fall 1978 report
to the University Regens on minority
recruitment, enrollment and retention,
417 Hispanic students (undergraduate
and graduate) were enrolled at the
Univesity.
Torres said some of these students
may require academic assistance, but
that most are able to complete their
course work without difficulty.
THE ORIENTATION program coin-
cides with National Hispanic Heritage
Week, and with the Sunday, Sept. 16,
celebration of Mexico's independence
from Spain in 1810.

OPEN

HOUSE'

T 0 U R S O F TH E A S H R A M B U I L D I N G S ** C 0 N T I NU 0 U S
V I D10 0E F S A MI U K T A N A N DA** R F R E S H E N T S
M U S I C ** & AT 4:30 A T A L K B Y M 0 IH E R G I R IJ A
S A R ASNWA T I, A5H1 R A M D IR EC 1 0 R

1:30 -Sp.m.

SUNDAY

Sept

16

1520

HIL L

ST.

ANN ARBOR

.

BRITISH OFFICIALS AGREE TO

DISCUSS GUERRILLA DEMANDS

Muzorewa threatens to terminate constitutional talks

LONDON (AP) - Zimbabwe
Rhodesia's first black prime minister
warned Britain against appeasing
guerrilla leaders he characterized as
' bloodthirsty murderers" and in-
dicated he might pull out of British-
sponsored constitutional talks.
"The time is overdue for the British
government to act firmly and
idecisively," Bishop Abel Muzorewa
'told a news conference. "The time for
appeasement is over."
'SOURCES SAID Muzorewa, upset by
British acceptance of a guerrilla
"demand to discuss replacing his gover-
- nment, sent a formal note to the con-
ference chairman, British Foreign
Secretary Lord Carrington, saying he
had decided to avoid discussion of any
} but constitutional matters.
British officials said Carrington's
compromise agenda - which included
discussion of guerrilla demands for a
transition administration involving
them, and a new army dominated by
their troops - was accepted "without
dissent" yesterday afternoon, and they
repeated their belief in an agreement
after Muzorewa's news conference.
When asked by reporters why he
agreed to the compromise, the bishop
said only that he told the conference
yesterday morning he reserved his
position to discuss anything but a con-
stitution.
MUZOREWA TOLD reporters his
government would reject any attempt
"by one or two arrogant dictators in the
making to impose themselves or their
foreign communist or Marxist
ideologies upon our country."

He said the guerrillas, who have been
fighting a seven-year war to gain con-
trol of the breakaway British colony,
"are bloodthirsty murderers intent
only on genocide and the subjugation of
seven million people. . . They occupy
permanently not one square inch of
Zimbabwe Rhodesia."
Delegates from Muzorewa's gover-
nment and the guerrilla forces of the
Patriotic Front met for only 35 minutes
yesterday and were'not scheduled to
convene again until this afternoon.
They have met for a total of six hours
since Carrington opened the talks Mon-
day:
Muzorewa indicated he was unhappy
with the course of the talks and said he
might pull out rather than discuss a
LSAT
and
Amity.
Review Seminars
15 student average class size
Team teaching technique
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800-243.4767

new administration involving guerrilla stitution," he said, adding it would be
leaders. "quite logical" for him to leave after
"I came here to discuss a cQn- the constitutional debate.
University of Michigan
Department of Theatre and Drama
AUDITIONS
FOR
The First Showcase Production
of the Season
Wole Soy inka's
THE LION AND THE JEWEL
an African drama
directed by Janice Reid

U-M MUSEUM OF ART
OPEN HOUSE
TODAY, SEPTEMBER 14-4-6 P.M.,
-Three special exhibitions:
Image and Life: 50,000 Years of
Japanese Prehistory
-The Inuit (Eskimo) Print
-Inuit Sculpture
- Exhibition-related films
- Live Japanese music
- Light refreshments
FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

Friday, Sept. 14
Saturday, Sept.15

7-11 Rm. 2528
1 -5 Rm 2528

Frieze Bldg.
Frieze Bldg.

Actors ,Dancers ,and Singers Needed
Auditions by Appointment Only. See Sign
Sheet Outside of Room 1502 in the

up

Frieze Building.

Read all

Instructions

Carefully.

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