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September 06, 1979 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


0
611 Church Street
Ann Arbor, Mi. 996-2747
robust
refreshing
retreat.

Page 16A-Thursday, September 6, 1979-The Michigan Daily
Dearborn, Flint seek new chiefs

By ADRIENNE LYONS
As the University community
awaited for word over the summer of
the school's search for a new president,
the selection processes for two of the
University's other high posts were
quietly being conducted.
Both Leonard Goodall and William
Moran, chancellors of the University's
Dearborn and Flint campuses, respec-
tively, accepted positions at other

schools almost simultaneously last
spring.
Goodall is now the president of the
University of Nevada-Las Vegas, and
Moran is now the Chancellor of the
University of North Carolina in Green-
sboro. Coincidentally, both men
assumed their University posts in 1971,
when the school created the Dearborn
and Flint chancellorships.
THE SEARCH process for new chan-
cellors is, according to Interim Univer-
sity President Allan Smith,
"somewhere between the search for a
dean and a president."
Each campus has its own search
committee, comprised of students,
alumni, faculty, and community
representatives. Both committees must
submit a list of their final choices to the
University Board of Regents by
February, 1980.
With Goodall gone, Political Science
Prof. Bernard Klein has been appointed
Interim Chancellor at Dearborn. For-
mer English Department Chairman
William Vasse took a similar position at
Flint.
SMITH SAID the search committees
are looking for candidates with strong
leadership abilities and academic
skills. The committees have also set
forth requirements for persons who can
work in an urban area, Smith said,
since both campuses are located in such
regions. Finally, the ability to interact

well with both the community and
faculty and work as fundraisers, were
the last qualifications Smith said the
committees wanted.
According to Moran, "the chancellor
is the chief executive officer of the

the two campus branches can be direc-
ted by the University president or the
Board of Regents, both of which have
authority on all three campuses.
THE TWO CAMPUSES are very
similar. The Flint campus opened in

students, most of whom commute to
school.
While neither Dearborn nor Flint of-
fer the same facilities as the Ann Arbor
campus, administrators point"out that
there are some advantages to attending
classes there. For instance, unlike in
Ann Arbor, all classes, most of which
are smaller, are taught by professors.
Both universities have grown
physically over the years. "We began
as a one-building campus that has led to
a branch of a University that enjoys a
42-acre campus," said Stan Blood, in-
formation services officer at Flint
University Relations. "We'll be
building for the next five years
straight," he said.
Already under construction in Flint is
a $7 million University Center, which
will come equipped with community
service rooms, saunas, and counseling
centers.
The Dearborn campus' additions am-
clude a new athletic building which
opened last fall, a $10 million state-
funded library, scheduled for com-
pletion in 1981, and a University Mall,
slated to open in 1980, said Dearborn
University Relations Director Richard
Reynolds.
Reynolds described the mall as half
offices and classrooms, and half con-
taining stores and game rooms.
Reynolds added that the $4 million
structure is privately funded.

Moran Goodall

'i 1.

campus. He is responsible for all
operations in Flint (or Dearborn). He
deals directly with the (state)
legislature and handles external
relations. He must also meet monthly
with the Regents," he added.
Despite a significant amount of
autonomy, however, the chancellors of

1956, just three years before the one at
Dearborn. Both schools were originally
attended by upperclass students only,
but have since grown to include fresh-
persons, sophomores, and some
graduate programs. The complexes are
located in the hearts of their respective
cities, making accessibility easy for the

Keep your
mind from

OUTSIDERS DOMINATE ANNUAL EVENT:
Hash Bash draws a new crowd

1

yawni ng.

By BETH PERSKY
It started in 1972 as a celebration of
the state's enactment of a more lenient
marijuana possession law. Each April 1
since, thousands have grouped on the
Diag for the famous Hash Bash, but
many claim the event has lost any
symbolic significance and has instead
turned into an all-day party with local
and out-of-town high schoolers as the
main celebrants.
The first Hash Bash attracted about
500 persons, most of them University
students. Over the years, however,
University students appear to have
been increasingly avoiding the mob on
the Diag every April Fool's Day.
IN THE EARLY DAYS, the Hash
Bash was an event supported by such
political groups as the Ann Arbor Tribal
Council, the Human Rights Par-

ty-which once held seats on the City
Council-and the Rainbow People's
Party, led by John Sinclair.
Sinclair had been among the leaders
of the fight for less severe penalties for
marijuana possession. After serving 29
months of a ten-year sentence for
giving two joints to an undercover
agent, Sinclair successfully appealed
his conviction.
Marijuana possession had been a
felony punishable by up to ten years on
prison, but the new law made it a
misdemeanor with violators subject to
up to one year in prison and/or a $1000
fine.
In 1974, Ann Arbor voters passed an
even less stringent law-after the city
council had passed and then rejected a
similar ordinance-making possession
of small amounts of marijuana within
the city limits subject only to a $5 fine.
OTHER EARLY SUPPORTERS of
the Hash Bash included Ann Arbor's
state Representative Perry Bullard,

who posed for photographers in 1973
with a joint in his mouth.
Attendance at the annual event
varies with the weather-the better the
weather the better the turnout. Five
hundred people appeared on a rainy
day in 1972, whereas 5000 swarmed to
the Diag the following year. Gloomy
weather in 1974 contributed to the
shrunken crowd of 1500, but the next
year an estimated 3000 showed up, in-
cluding motorcycle gang members, a
natural healer, and a creature dressed
as a lizard who claimed to be "tooth
decay." In 1976, two strippers on the
steps of the Graduate Library joined
the revelers, while almost 5000
amassed on the Diag in 1977. The
estimated figures fell to 3500 in 1978 and
2000 last April.
But the crowd size is difficult to
estimate according to Ann Arbor Police
Chief Walter Krasny. He said as many
as 10,000 may flow in and out of the Diag
area during the entire day.
"BUT MOST PEOPLE COME out of

Emma

U

curiosity rather than any desire to sell
or smoke pot," Krasny said. "The
majority of them are high school kids
from the outside area-there's a large
influx of people from all over this part
of the state."
Though years ago a large portion of
the crowd was University-oriented
students, Krasny said, participants now
are "generally in the teen-age group."
The police chief said the popularity of
hard drugs, especially LSD, has
decreased greatly at the Bash during
recent years.
"LSD has decreased tremendously in
the past five or six years-People have
become aware of the dangers," said
Krasny.
DESPITE THE REDUCED prepon-
derance of hard drugs, police protec.
tion at the Bash has increased, spurred
in 1977 by protest letters by members of
the University community-ad-
ministration, staff, and students-to
several legislators. The corresponden-
ce was followed by a meeting between
Ann Arbor police and University of-
ficials.
While two plainclothes police officers
were sufficient to contain the crowd in
its early years, 26 appeared in 1977, 60
in 1978, and 40 last year.
"More problems have been
developing over the past few years,"
said Krasny. "Drinking and disorderly
conduct are the reasons we had to take
a different look at the Hash Bash."
During the Hash Bash, the Univer-
sity's safety department keeps all
buildings locked except to, those
producing a yellow student ID card.
"Our major concern during the un-
fortunate event is the protection of the
buildings," said University Safety
Director Walt Stevens.

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ANNIVERSARY 4
SEPT 74 - SEPT 79
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