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September 13, 1979 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-13

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, September 13, 1979-Page 7
NO PRO-LIFE GROUP BELIEVED RESPONSIBLE:
Birth control center vandalized

By MARIANNE EGRI
Although past attacks on planned
parenthood buildings have been linked
to pro-life groups, no ties to these
organizations have been found in an in-
cident Tuesday at a Kalamazoo clinic
Iunder construction, police said yester-
day.
jKalamazoo police officer William
Doster said 20-year-old Kalamazoo
residents Michael Tefft and
Christopher Butala, charged with
breaking and entering and preparing to
burn Reproductive Health Care Center-
Planned Parenthood, are against abor-
tion, "but as far as we know they don't
belong to a group. They had been
drinking and had probably decided to
take an active part in dismantling the
building.""
JANE WILSON, Center Information
and Education Specialist, said the at-
tack "seems to have been made by two
individuals although historically
similar incidents have occurred that
were caused by groups identifying
themselves as pro-life. I believe this
represents an inconsistency because
any violent act cannot be considered a
pro-life action."
Wilson said she hopes the motives of
the men will be discovered in the trial
set for September 18.i
However, she added, "nothing we see
at the present connected the young men
Sto a pro-life group.''
DOSTER SAID the men set off a
silent alarm system while breaking in
through a window before they had a
chance to start a fire. "They brought a
bottle of oil which they were apparently
going to use to start the fire," Doster
said. Tefft is out on bail and Butala is
being held in the county jail. The meri
were arraigned Tuesday.
The Center is a private nonprofit
agency affiliated with the Planned
Parenthood Federation of America
which performs first trimester abor-

tions and vasectomies, and provides
birth control methods, sterility infor-.
mation, sexuality counseling and
reproductive education for professional
and community groups.

not been successful, Wilson said Alters
natives Incorporated, which merged
with Planned Parenthood of Kalamazoo
to form the Center, was "extremely
damaged" by a firebomb in 1975, but no

.:: : : .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..: . ...... .: .:
The attack 'seems to have been made by two indi
viduals altough historically similar incidents have
occurred that were caused by groups identifying them-
selves as pro-life.'
-Jane Wilson
rx'"{ Esi2gi': E r iE ?i ::":::::::": :. :s:::i:;i:r;; :$;s i$:35 £s m mm a ale

According to Wilson, the Center sees
12,000 patients a year, most of whom
come for birth control.
THIS IS THE second time an attack
had been made on the nearly-completed
building. According to Doster, "a
Molotov cocktail," a bottle of gas with a
rag in it that explodes when lit, was
thrown, on the building roof about a
month and a half ago, but failed to ex-
plode.
"One of the'men (Tefft or Butala)
said he threw the Molotov cocktail, but
this hasn't been proven yet," said
Doster.
Although the last two attempts have

HUNDREDS OF EVACUEES from low lying coastal areas jammed Pensacola High School as hurricane Frederick
brewed in the nearby Gulf of Mexico yesterday.
400,000 evacuate Frederic'spath

one was apprehended.
In Ann Arbor the Planned Paren-
thood Clinic has not had to deal with
these problems, according to Ellen
Leonard, Planned Parenthood coor-
dinator of information and education.
, "We know there are a variety of
clinics which have been severely
damaged or threatened by anti-choice
groups, but we've been really fortunate
because the community is more accep-
ting and supportive," she said.
"Kalamazoo is far more conservative.
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(Continued from Page 1)
storm's eye, which varied from 20 to 40
;Giles in width, said foreca r Vaughn
Carmichael. Gales extended out 150
miles to the north and 150 miles to the
south of the eye. A tidal surge of 10 to 15
feet above normal was predicted up to
50 miles to the east of where the eye
crosses the coast.
Forecasters said the storm was ap-
proaching No. 4 on the National.
Hurricane Center's 1-5 rating scale.
Camille, one of the two strongest U.S.
storms this century, was a No. 5, a
"Catastrophic" hurricane.
One man was killed and another was
reported missing as the multibillion
dollar offshore oil industry shut down.
They were among 2,500 workers who
left their rigs off the Louisiana coast as
Frederic strengthened.
In Florida, where Gov. Bob Graham
ordered out 1,000 National Guardsmen
to assist with the evacuation of 150,000
persons, police said they would use for-
ce, if necessary, to move people out of
the danger areas.
Mayor Gary Greenough ofrMobile,
Ala., repeatedly urged 70,000 residents
of the area to evacuate. To those still
there late yesterday he said, "just sit
down and hang on."
ALONG THE Mississippi coast,

where Hurricane Camille left 250 dead
and damage in the millions of dollars
when it crashed inland near Gulfport 10
years ago, the residents needed little
prodding to flee.
''The evacuation is going smoothly,"
said a Civil Defense spokesman in
Gulfport. "I think most people remem-
ber what Camille did to our coast in
1969."
Another 20,000 were evacuated in
Louisiana, mainly from Plaquemines
Parish.
THE. NATIONAL Guard was called
out in the Florida Panhandle, where
Civil Defense officials estimated about
150,000 were being evacuated from low-
lying areas in five counties.
"We don't get too much resistance -
most people want to get out because of
what Camille did," said sheriff's
spokesman Mickey Jeffcoat in Pen-
sacola. Sgt. Don Parkerrsaid the
Florida governor's order for
evacuation gave deputies the power to
forcefully remove people when
necessary.
Louisiana officials reported about
20,000 people were ordered out of the
danger area, mainly in Plaquimines
Parish.
THE NAVY and Air Force ordered

340 planes flown out of seven bases in
Florida, Mississippi and Louisiana to
get out of the path of the storm.
Motorists crowded highways leading
out of coastal towns. Cars clogged
gasoline stations. Long lines queued up
at grocery and hardware stores from
New Orleans to Panama City as storm
watchers stocked up on batteries, can-
ned food and tape to mask glass win-
dows.

Use
Daily
Class if ieds

U

Trial li e

FOR EVERYONE AND ANYONE INTERESTED IN ISRAEL

From staff reports
A $1.1 million suit filed by a former
professor against the University is
likely to go to trial sometime early next
year.
At a conference. Tuesday, Detroit
Federal District Court Judge Philip
Pratt told the attorney for ex-professor
Jonathan Marwil another pre-trial con-
ference would be held Jan. 8, at which
time 'a trial schedule will probably be
set.
MARWIL, WHO was a member of the
Humanities Department of the College
of Engineering, charged that he was
unfairly dropped from the faculty
without a tenure review.
In the suit, he claims his rights to due

©

DC[ 10 I

process of law and freedom of speech
were violated in the decision not to
grant him a tenure review, and that the
defendants in the case-the University
Board of Regents, Humanities-Depar-
tment Chairman J. C. Mathes, and
Ralph Loomis and Dwight Stevenson,
members of the departmenf's ad-
ministrative committee-are guilty of
breach of contract and interference
with contractual relations.
Faculty supporters of Marwil ap-
peared before the Regents last May,
June, and July, asking that the- Board
intervene in Marwil's case. The Regen-
ts still have the option to act. The next
meeting of the Board is Sept. 20 and 21.

FILMS - ENTERTAINMENT
FREE REF RERSHMENTS
(ISRAELI STYLE)

I

Scalpers cash in'
on Notre Dame game

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

8: 00 P,.M.

a'i

IN THE PENDLETON ROOM, MICHIGAN UNION

Noon Luncheon
Homemade Soup & Sandwiches 75.
Friday Sept. 14
HOWARD SIMON
Exec. Dir. Mich. A.C.L.U.
"is There a Draft in Your Future?"

(Continued from Pa ge 1)
direct transactions are usually conduc-
ted on a small, isolated scale rather
than in the big league operation in front
of the Union.
Scalpers point out they are doing the
community a service by acting as ticket
agents, and who could expect them to
do it for nothing? One such
businessman, sunning himself on the
ledge in front of the Union, holding a
fistful of tickets, claimed he would
make "between $500 and $1500" for
about 30 hours work. But he quickly ad-
ded that the high profits are not
available to everyone.
' THE BUSINESS requires "money,
skill, and guts," the scalper said with
obvious pride, noting that not everyone
is comfortable holding a pile of car-
dboard that cost several hurilred
dollars.
He said the scalpers'. profit margin
hinges on good weather Saturday if the
ticket is not sold by Friday night.
Another factor that can reduce the
value of a ticket is confiscation by
police. According to Ann Arbor police,
selling a ticket for more than its $9 face
value - although students can buy
them for $4.50 each - is a criminal of-
fense. But enforcement is apparently
lax.
"WE DON'T DO a lot of active enfor-
cement," said police Lt. Dale Heath.
"It's sort of a victimless crime." Heath
s4id he could not recall an instance
when Ann Arbor police had arrested a
football ticket scalper. "But if someone
complains, we'll investigate it," he
said.
LSAT
and
f__A AT

If the illegal aspect of the business
doesn't overly concern the police, it
bothers the scalpers less. "It's not like
we're criminals," said one. "I'm just a
student."
Student tickets, in fact, are among
the most heavily traded. The tickets
warn student I.D. is required with the
ticket for stadium entry, but this never
has seemed to faze the many graying
non-students who buy student tickets.
ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT Ticket
Manager Allan Renfew said officials
"spot check" for student identification
cards. But the huge crowd makes the
task difficult, he said, adding "we've
caught maybehalf a dozen per game."
ISRAL
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* X-mas/New Years
* Intersession
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Outside N.Y. State
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GUILD HOUSE

802 Monroe (corner of Oakland)

CANTERBURY LOFT presents
StarvingArtists Sale
all works-by local artists priced at $15 or less
ATTENTION ARTISTS
University and community artists are welcome to
place up to 10 items in this sale; all items priced at
$15 or less. Artists receive all proceeds from their
works which are sold. $5 registration fee to cover
publicity costs. To reserve space call 665-0606 as
soon as possible.
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
September 20-22 12 noon to 6 p.m:
at CANTERBURY LOFT, 332S. State Street
second floor, two doors south of Nickels Arcade

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1/4pound* of 100%pure beef
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