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September 12, 1979 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10--Wednesday, September 12, 1979-The Michigan Daily

Starving
Medicine Cabinet
Sale
Everytday items..
But not everyday Prices!
Prices Good Through Sept. 22, 1979

sc
Angola's president Neto dies in MO',W'
f 1.

MOSCOW (AP) - President
kgostinho Neto of Angola, a doctor and
poet who became a key, figure in the lef-
dst tide that swept black Africa in the
1970s, is dead at 56 after undergoing
surgery in Moscow for. advanced can-
cer of the pancreas.
The death on Monday of Angola's
Marxist chief leaves a leadership
vacuum at a time of political and
economic turmoil in the southern
African nation. The ruling Popular
Movement for the Liberation of Angola
(PMLA) still faces resistance from
guerrillas in the countryside, the MPLA
itself is torn by dissent and the economy
has not recovered from a devastating
1975-76 civil war.
The war erupted between the MPLA
and two Western backed factions after
Portugal granted Angola independence
on Nov. 11, 1975.
ALTHOUGH Neto remained 1 allied
with the Soviet Union, he flirted with

the West in recent months, openly
seeking U.S. recognition for his regime,
in hopes of receiving badly , needed
economic aid.
Portugal's national news agency
reported from Lisbon that Planning
Minister Jose Eduardo dos Santos was
named. by the MPLA as'. interim,
president and has assumed all'" fun-
ctions of the office. It said Neto had
selected Dos Santos to head the gover-
nment and MPLA central committee
secretary Lucio Lara to lead the party.
Neto was both president. and party
leader.,
The Soviet news agency Tass said
Lara led a delegation of MPLA officials
that flew into Moscow yesterday after
being informed of Neto's death.
NETO, LONG rumored to be suf-
fering, from cancer, had visited the
Soviet Union several times in. the past
three years, apparently for medical
treatment. He arrived on his final visit

last Thursday.
Soviet doctors who performed
surgery Sunday found his condition
inoperable, the Tass news agency said.
It said Neto also had a long history of
chronic progressive hepatitis and
cirrhosis of the liver.
Portugal granted independence to
Angola, a colony for 400 years, in
November 1975 after more than a
decade of war between Portuguese
troops and three black guerrilla ar-
mies, including Neto's MPLA. A three-
way civil war broke out and the MPLA,
with the help of massive Soviet aid and
thousands of Cuban troops, defeated the
other guerrilla groups, which had
Western support.
The quiet-spoken, bespectacled Neto
spent a total of five years in jail during
three decades as an anti-colonial ac-
tivist both in Portugal and Angola.

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I

Neto
... leaves leadership vacuum

___ .
,

BRITISH, GUERRILLAS ARGUE ON CONFERENCE AGENDA:

Rhodesian peace talks head into. trouble

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n..+
j

LONDON (AP) - British-sponsored
peace talks on Zimbabwe Rhodesia
headed into trouble yesterday when
guerrilla leaders insisted on discussing
the war and Britain tried to keep the
talks on the less explosive issue of a
new constitution.
Bishop Abel Muzorewa, the country's
first black prime minister after nine
decades of white minority rule, made
an impassioned plea for Britain to
recognize his government.
Yoreign Secretary Lord Carrington,
who is presiding at the talks, stuck to
his line that a constitutional agreement

must be reached before the conference
can turn to other issues. Those include
setting up a new transition government
and tackling the roles of the guerrillas
and Zimbabwe Rhodesia's white-led
security forces under any new order.
"IF WE try to discuss the whole spec-
trum of subjects at once we are unlikely
to make progress," Carrington told
delegates after their opening speeches,
a conference spokesman reported
last night.
"We must know the direction before
it is possible to discuss the route;"
Carrington added.

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.1

JCuban weapons

A conference spokesman said
Muzorewa's delegation remained silent
during subsequent exchanges - which
he described as "courteous" - between
Carrington and guerrilla leaders over
the procedural issue, still unresolved
when yesterday's 75-minute session en-
ded.
IN HIS opening address, Muzorewa
declared: "We require to know clearly
and categorically what more your
government requires from us before
you will remove sanctions and grant
recGgnition to our government."
"We have a new non-racial nation,
one that is dedicating itself to be a good
example, not only on the African con-
tinent but throughout the world."
The second day of the conference got
under way five hours late to allow
Patriotic Front guerrilla leaders
Joshua Nkomo and Robert Mugabe
more time to prepare their reply to
Britain's declared intention that the
conference aim first for agreement on a'
new constitution.
THE CONFERENCE is Britain's
latest bid to end the seven-year war
now aimed at ousting Muzorewa and his
government, which the guerrillas
denounce as no more than a black
facade covering continuing white-
minority control.
British Foreign Secretary Lord

Carrington, the conference chairmari,
opened the talks Monday by insisting
that the warring parties agree first to p
new constitution and not plunge into the
fundamental question of whose forcros
will comprise and control a new
national army. The military issue is the
main preoccupation of the Patriot*
Front guerrilla alliance.
Nkomo, who spoke first when the con
ference resumed behindJ closed doors
yesterday afternoon, said Britain's
constitutional proposals were vague
and avoided "the real issues' ' to'
solved at the conference, including cotim.
trol of the army. ..A
IT IS not our purpose in- coming to
London tobetray or abandon any of the
victories of the people of., Zimbabwe
who have partly liberated themselves
and are continuing the task," Nkomo
said of the bush war that so far has
taken 18,400 lives.
"Whose army shall defend Zimbabwe
and its people? ... Whose. police ford
shall protect the people of Zimbab
we? ... How do we create the situation
for the holding of free, and fair elec-
tions?"
Muzorewa's government is the
product of an "internal settlement'
agreed upon by former Rhodesian
Prime Minister Ian Smith, -leader of th
white minority, and three moderate
black leaders, including Muzorewa.

.'"a

":

threaten. U.S.
(Continued from Page 1)
PENTAGON OFFICIALS declined
comment on Jackson's charac-
terization of Cuba's plans forthe boats, i
although *in the past they have ex- i
VL caaCU LIU great concern over the
vessels.
Meanwhile, a censored version of a
military intelligence report surfaced
that said the Soviets are increasing
Moth the quantity and quality of their i
weapons shipments to Cuba.
The Defense Intelligence Agency 1

oil supplies
report, given behind closed doors to a
House subcommittee last April, said
Cuba has progressed from getting
hand-me-down military equipment to
its present status near or at the head of
the list for sophisticated armaments.
Those armaments include new Turya
class hydrofoil patrol boats that can be
armed with torpedoes and guns, plus
new amphibious armored- infantry
vehicles and helicopter gunships. The
intelligence report said Cuba is the first
nation outside Russia itself to receive
the new Turya craft. ti

11

ATTENTION .PARENTS AND STUDENTS!

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Dreams Card Come True!

ACADEMIC DEMANDS ON TODAY'S STUDENTS MAKE IT VITALLY
IMPORTANT TO BE ABLE TO READ RAPIDLY WITH HIGH LEVELS
OF COMPREHENSION.

LEARN HOW AT:

q0n V "
7 Week Read i n g Pro ram To Begin Sept. 19 & 20
Classes Will Be Held at 3 p.m. & T p.m. at Michigan League
PRESIDENT KENNEDY recommended course and was taken by his White House Staff and Joint Chiefs
of Staff, and has been also taught to every succeeding new Presidential Administration.
SENATOR WILLIAM PROXMIRE thought it "one of the most useful educational experiences I have ever
had:"
WEST POINT ACADEMY and the UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY are currently recommending this
Course to all incoming Freshmen.

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,.:, y
± r
. .
i
,
f

NEARLY 2 MILLION PEOPLE HAVE TAKEN THIS COURSE IN.
CLUDiNG$ numerous Washington Legislators, and business
executives.

ATTE

TION S

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..IrMI11WIkMiwl x
u!Mxw.wtiM ..

! .. _ .
i-

You are invited to our FREE introductory reading lesson
Sept. 10-14, 4:115 & 7 p.m. at the
MICHIGAN LEAGUE

l:AtlMAa

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