100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 11, 1979 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 11, 1979-Page 5

Vance, Dobrynin begin

talks on troops in Cuba

;::WASHINGTON (AP)-The United States and the Soviet
Liion yesterday began what State Department officials say
mnight be a protracted series of negotiations over Soviet com-
bat troops in Cuba.
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance and Soviet Ambassador
Anatoly Dobryriin opened talks on the Cuban situation after
Vance and CIA Director Stansfield Turner had spent the
morning in a closed door session with members of the Senate
Armed Services Committee.
SEN. ROGER JEPSEN (R-Iowa) emerged from the 3 -
hour Senate committee meeting and said that Vance in-
dicated he was "going to be quite firm and insistent on get-
ting-some direct answers" from Dobrynin.
Jepsen also said the committee received no assurances
that there are no long-range nuclear weapons in Cuba.
Asked if the committee was given any explanation for the
preoence of the Soviet troops, Sen. John Warner (R-Va.),

replied that "Vance said that would be question number one"
for Dobrynin, who returned Sunday: from a vacation in the
Soviet Union.
The Soviet Ambassador has not been in Washington since
the announcement last month that the Saviet troops had been
discovered in Cuba.
THERE WAS NO official word about the bargaining
positions Vance and Dobrynin would bring to the talks, but.
State Department officials said they did not expect anything
to be settled in the first session.
Last week, Vance and President Carter both said the
"status quo" in Cuba is not acceptable but they have refused
to say what changes would satisfy them.
Vance has said the administration realizes that the
Soviets have had military advisers in Cuba for many years.
It is the recent discovery that 2,000 to 3,000 of them were

organized as a cohbat unit that is a matter of serious con-
cern, he said.
KEY MEMBERS of the Senate have been less restrained.
Many have said the Soviet troops must be removed if the new
strategic arms limitation treaty is to be ratified.
The kind of pressure will make it more difficult to reach a
satisfactory solution to the Cuban problem, administration
sources have said.
The Soviets have largely kept quiet about the furor. Unof-
ficially, Soviet diplomats have insisted that the troops are not
a combat force but are advisers who have been in Cuba for
many years.
THEY SAY THE Cubans have a right to invite the Soviets
to their island, and that there is nothing in U.S.-Soviet under-
standings of 1962 and 1970 that bars them.
The State Department conceded the latter point last week,
saying the agreements that settled the 1962 Cuban missile

crisis and the 1970 Cienfuegos submarine'base crisis covered
only offensive weapons systems and not combat troops.
A hint about the possible Soviet position emerged over the
weekend when an official Soviet radio commentator made
mention of the American naval base at Guatanamo, Cuba.
THE COMMENTATOR noted that the United States has
persistently refused to discuss abandoning the base, which it
has held since 1903 on an indefinite lease.
The commentator did not say whether the Soviets would
offer to withdraw their troops in return for American with
drawal from Guantanamo:
But in slightly similar circumstances during the Cuban
missile crisis of 1962, then-Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev
raised the issue of American missiles in Turkey and asked
for their removal.
State Department spokesman Hodding Carter said the
U.S. base at Guantanamo is "not negotiable."

MEETING TO A VOID FUR THER BLOODSHED:

Guerrillas
LONDON (AP)-Nationalist guerrilla
leaders met face-to-face yesterday with
the, enemy-the Zimbabwe Rhodesian
government-at the opening of British-
sponsored constitutional talks widely
billed as a last chance to avert
widespread war in southern Africa.
Foreign Secretary Lord Carrington
urged both sides to reach a com-
promise, saying "the price of failure
would be further prolonged bloodshed."
RE ASKED them to focus on a new
constitution for Zimbabwe Rhodesia
that will decrease the power given to
the white minority, which accounts for
230,000 persons out of a population of 7.2
million.
"I believe the people assembled in
this room have it in their power to end
the war," said Carrington, serving as
conference chairman.
"I do not believe the people of
Rhodesia will readily forgive any party
which deprives them of this opportunity
to- settle their future by peaceful
means."
THE CONFERENCE, called by
Britain, brought together Robert
Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo of the
guerrilla Patriotic Front with members
of .Zimbabwe Rhodesia's government,
led by Bishop Abel Muzorewa, the
breakaway.British colony's first black
prime minister-and including Ian
Smith, his predecessor.
Nkomo and Mugabe have waged a
seven year guerrilla war against the
Salisbury regime from bases in Zambia
and.Mozambique. More than 18,000 per-
sons have died in the fighting.
It .was the first time that opposing.
parties i. the. war ;in ZimbAbwe
Rhodesia gat down together,, since a
peace conference fizzled in Geneva in
1976.
THE TALKS opened on schedule, but

face-to-face with Rhodesians

there was an immediate squabble over
seating arrangements and a refusal by
guerrilla leaders to attend a British
welcoming reception for the two sides.
"We felt we could not at this time
distinguish the color of the tea we might
have tonight from the blood of women
and children which the puppet regime
of Muzorewa and Smith are shedding at
this very moment," said Edison
Zvobgo, a spokesman for the Patriotic
Front.
"It would be the same thing as having
the leadership of whoever killed Lord
Mountbatten to come to a social dinner
with Lord Carrington here in London,"
Zvobgo said. Mountbatten, British
World War II hero, was slain by Irish
terrorists last month.
SOME FRONT delegates also objec-
ted to being seated opposite Muzorewa
and members of the former white
government. After the closed door

session began at Lancaster House, the The present constitution, under which
delegates agreed to sit as Britain had Muzorewa was .elected in April, is
arranged-facing each other. viewed by the black nationalists as a
Carrington called for a decrease in sellout since it guarantees the whites 28
the role of whites in Zimbabwe of 100 parliamentary seats, and gives
Rhodesia, but said there should be "ap- them control of security and judicial
propriate safeguards" for minorities in functions.
the new constitution.
""""""'"'""- - - --- - -- - "'" "-"""""""'I""'
BOUFFANT Hair Fashion
and Hair Weave Center
I
662-8401
Microscopic Hair Analysis
MRS. HOOKS 'The Complete Hair Core
Clinic for Problem Hair'
I FREE HAIR TREATMENT WITH COUPON I
1----- ----- ------------- ----------I

.

o
D
u W
Ujt

.I
p

--I

TEYIE WAS BORN THE SAME YEAR AS THE SWMW UNE
TOT i950,TOPAREt4T&QFMODERATE INCOMEAND
EDUCAT",BUT EXCESSIVE SU'PPINESS.NSFUTURE
WASTOBE SHAPED BY THEIR ONE BADTRAiT. P, Irv
HpN NEXT TIME YOU SEE THE
GARfiAGE MANASK HIM IN! "
o j0
r-
o j

--" - -

WHILE STEVIE WAS STILL ON ALL FOURS, AN ELDERLY
AUNT NAMED MARTHENA GAVE HIM HIS FIRST AND
ONLY GIFT. A SWINGLINE TOT STAPLER-
SWEAR BY MY TRUSTY TOT, I SHALL
LIVE IN THEMIDDST OF NEATNESS
AND ORDER ALL THE REST bF MY DAYS !
13

STEVIE BEGAN HIS CAMPAIGN AGAINST DISORDER
AT HOME-BY THE AGE OF TEN HE HAD LEO''NEAT'
CLEAN4 CAMPAIGNS"'ACROSS THE U.S. ANDIN SIX
THE SWINGLINE TOT50STAPLES REPORTS
AND TERM PAPERS AND GOES WHEREVER YOU
GO-IT'S NO SI7GER THAN A PACK OF GUM!
STAPLE YOUR
WAY TO HAP
SWINGrLINE E S
TOTS ,. S

f

A Division of Swingline Inc.,
32-00 Skillman Avenue, LI.C., N.Y. 11101

Swingiine Tot 500
made in America.
Look for them at
stationery stores,
stationery departments
and college bookstores.

L -

l G

The Housing Division feels that students should be free
to concentrate on academic (and other) pursuits with-
out added worry of dietary requirements. Therefore,

I

'

University Residence Halls offer
tracts" for University students liv
and in non-University housing

"Optional Meal Con-
ing in Baits, Fletcher,

i

Fall
Term

* available at most halls
* select one convenient location
* initiate or cancel at your request
* select lunch, or dinner, or both
* re-serves on nearly all foods. Salad,
soft drinks and soft serve ice cream
available for both meals

Winter
Term
$500.76

Fall & Winter
Terms
$971.56

BOTH MEALS
(excludes Sunday lunch)

$470.80

LUNCH ONLY
(except Sunday lunch)

$201.30

$214.11

$415.41

reasonable prices:

DINNER ONLY

$293.70

$312.39

$606.09

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan