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September 08, 1979 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'Cats easy to claw? NewQB,
tough Blue defense know today

The Michigan Daly-Saturdav. Seatember 8. 1979-Pne 11

- . - -l t- vi---

THE LIN

EUPSS
NORTHWESTERN
........................Clarke Prichard M7)
................................. Jim Ford id )

MICHIGAN

OFFENSE
TE

(80) Doug. Marsh..

By BILLY SAHN
As learning experiences go, this may
prove a fairly painless afternoon for the
Michigan football team.
For a temporarily makeshift offen-
sive line, a game-starved quarterback
and a coach who has nearly cornered
the market on cautious optimism, the
pre-opening day attitude in the
Wolverine camp could have been quite
different from the sentiments Bo,
Schembechler has displayed this hectic,
calm-before-the-storm week.
ACCORDING TO Schembechler, who
commandeers Michigan into its.
gridiron centennial today against Nor-
thwestern, games are played one at a
time. He adds, "We won't be looking
ahead. Northwestern is the only game
we've prepared for thus far."
Honesty notwithstanding, the
Wolverines have, for the last nine
years, prepared for an assumed event
- an easy victory. Indeed, there have
been exceptions, like the 7-0 sleeper
which kicked off the 1972 campaign,
and the 7-3 nail-biter Michigan pulled
off in 1967. But total the scores from the

last four meetings and you get a rather
lopsided score of 229-41;
Nevertheless, Michigan will learn a
lot from this ball game. In that sense, it
may well be the most important game
that the Wolverines play all year.
The Wolverines return to the gridiron
this afternoon without an experienced
quarterback. The Rick Leach days are
history. According to Schembechler,
the starting signal'caller will be either
B. J. Dickey, senior John Wangler, or
sophomore Gary Lee. But the final
decision may be concealed from the
over 100,000 Michigan Stadium fans un-
til the offense takes the field for its first
series of downs.
Schembechler did say that freshman
Rich Hewlett, who was also a possible,
though unlikely, starter, will miss this
game because of a pulled hamstring
muscle.
While Michigan must contend with
their "up-in-the-air" quarterback
situation, the Wildcats boast their
biggest threat in senior field general
Kevin Strasser.
AT 6-3, 190, Strasser ranked fourth in

the Big Ten last year in passing. In 11
games, Strasser unloaded 307 passes.
That meant Northwestern was passing
on almost every other play. On four oc-
casions Northwestern passed on fourth
down, and in all four instances did they
gain enough yardage for a first down.
"We'll stay with what we are doing,"
commented second-year head coach
Rick Venturi. "I want to keep the
bizarre quality in our offense. I don't
like sterile football," he continued.
DESPITE ALL the enthusiasm that
Venturi has injected into the Wildcats
and their fans, they remain the favorite
for last place this season in the Big Ten.
Their defense is weak. Last year, the
Wildcat defenders yielded 440 points to
opposing teams, and allowing them to
grind out 464.4 yards per game.
DESPITE THE uncertainty at the QB
position, the Wolverines boast a group
of highly talented athletes on offense.
Leading the offense will be senior
wingback Ralph Clayton. Clayton
heads a group of receivers which
Schembechler terms "pretty good."
Joining Clayton will be tightend Doug

Marsh, wide receiver Alan Mitchell,
and freshman Anthony Carter, also at
wide receiver. But the Blue's awesome
power lies in the defense.
A perennial statistical leader, the ex-
perienced corps of defenders is led by
linebacker Ron Simpkins and tackle
Curtis Greer. Both earned All-Big-Ten
first team honors last season.
Joining Greer and Simpkins on the
field are free safety Mike Harden and
wideside halfback Mike Jolly, both
returning starters. If Strasser hopes to
click on his murderous aerials, he'll
have to thread the pigskin in between
-this talented pair.

(72)
(65)
(59)
(64)
(76)
(30)
(22)
(23)
(32)
(10)
(83)
(53)
(95)
(55)
(77)
(40)
(41)
(31)
(16)
(28)
< 4)

Ed Muransky ..........................
Kurt Becker .............................
George Lillija .............................
John Arbeznik ............................
Mike Lewd ...........................
Alak Mitchell .......................
Ralph Clayton. ......................
Lawrence Reid ...........................
Stan Edwards ............................
B.J. Dickey............................ .

RG ............................. Bill Draznik
C ............................. Mike Fiedler
LG ........................... Kevin Kenyon
QT......... ....John SchroberI
WR ........................Todd Sheets
WB ..............................Steve Bogan
FB ......................... Mike Cammon
TB ........................... Dave Mishler
QB ........................... Kevin Strasser

5)
7)

ST

DEFENSE

Ben Needham ............................
Mel Owens ..............................
Curtis Greer .......................
Dale Keitz............................
Mike Trgovac ............................
Ron Simpkins.......................
Andy Cannavino....................
Stuart Harris .......................
Mike Jolly............................
Mark Braman ............................
Michael Harden ..........................

OLB
OLB
T
T
MG
ILB
ILB
Wolf
WHB
SHB
S

...............................Dean Payne
................................Kevin Berg
.. Norm Wells
...............Bruce Robinett
...........................Brian Stasiewicz
................................Jim Miller
.............................Churck Kern
.. . . . . TomMcGlade
...............Dana iHemphill
.................................Lou Tiberi
...............................Ben Butler

.. e.

H 'NEFF IS ENOUGH

At the football writers' luncheon Thursday, Bo
Schembechler was asked who would be the starting
quarterback when Michigan opens the 1979 season
against Northwestern today. Schembechler has this to
say about the mystery, "I'm not going to tell you if I
haven't told them." This was a mere two days before
game day. With the quarterback riddle unsolved, this
fictitious conflict came to my mind.
It's Friday night at the Campus Inn and B.J. Dickey
(one of the three candidates) is nervously pacing his
room. He is thinking, "I should start. I run the option
better thanwanyone else. I have experience, but I don't
know. Wangler's been looking awfully good. I never ex-
pected him to come off an injury that well.
"Then again, he could easily start Gary (Lee). He's
from Flint Southwesterin and God, Bo loves those guys
from Southwestern. (Rick) Leach, (Gene) Johnson,
(Rodney) Feaster - there's no way I'll start. But I don't
know - he's green; he's never been tested in college." I
don't know. I wish I did though, because it's tough men-
tally.
"But then again, Wangler might have been ahead of
me last year if he hadn't pinched a nerve. Aw, what's it
matter, anyway. Those guys are all my friends. The
whole thing is ridiculous. I wonder what those guys are
thinking now."
"Hey, Gary, who do you think'll start?"
"I don't know, man, but I think Wangler's got it sewn
up. For some reason, Bo really likes him," said Lee.
"I'll ask Wangler who he thinksit's gonna be," mut-
terg Dickey.
"Hey John, what's the deal?"
"I think it's gonna be you. He knows how well you run,
considering your two TD runs last year. He's been run-
ning you with the first team for most of the year so it's
got to be you. You know their movements much better
thanIdo and Gary, he doesn't have much experience."
Dickey thanked Wangler and went back to his room.-

By Billy Neff
He started to flip a deck of cards around and turned over
a few cards to see how well he'd do. He turned over some
cards and Lee kept getting the highest card.
"Aw, s---, Gary keeps winning. Hell, I wish I knew."
Little did Dickey know, but back in another hotel
room, Schembechler was doing the same thing -
picking cards to solve the mystery. It's 22 for Lee, 22 for
Wangler and 20 for Dickey. Dammit, I thought it would
be easier than this. Dickey won twice and Wangler won
once to knot it at 22.
"They all have their strong points. Dickey runs the op-
tion better than the other two, Wangler combines the run
and the pass the best and Lee is the best passer. John
leads so well, Lee is so quick and Dickey, well, he's got
the experience," thought Schembechler.
"Jerry (Michigan offensive line coach Hanlon), come
in here and pick a card. Whoever you pick will start,"
Schembechler declared.I
We switch back to Dickey's room and find the Ohio
junior fast asleep. Or is he?
"It should be me but will it be? How can I get fired up
- I'm so worried about whether I am going to start that
I can't even get pumped up." The night passes without
much ado, although Dickey doesn't get much sleep due
to his obvious preoccupation.
En route to Michigan Stadium, there is a gnawing in
Dickey's stomach. He still doesn't know. "Bo is an op-
tion coach, so he's got to go with me." He continues to
himself, "I have the experience over those guys."
"Wangler, Lee and Dickey, come in to my office,"
Schembechler says. "I've decided after much, much
careful deliberation that the starter is . . ." there is a
pause, which seems like an eternity to all involved. "It's
you, John."
Hanlon had pulled an ace of diamonds, a queen for Lee
and a ten for Dickey - careful deliberation, indeed!

-
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Happy Hour: 4-6; 9-12

'

U
AluImni
harriers
.wtowit em
By ANDI POCH
Greg Meyer, Bill Donakowski and
Mike McGuire, three former NCAA All-
Americans, are three of Michigan's all-
time greatest distance runners. When
they took to the line Friday on the
University Golf Course for a 1979 team
Cross Country time trial, it was no
wonder some heads turned.
Meyer, who runs for Greater Boston,
led the way cruising through the 4.3
mile course in 21:16. Senior Dan We're all about roller skating.
Heikkinen followed -in 21:27. Bill Interested?
Weidenbach was third in 21:37, followed Good street skates for retail and rental.
by veteran Mike McGuire. Senior Dave Everybody's doing it!
Lewis and alumnus Donakowski Safe, clean and fun, or so Cher tells us.
crossed next.
Juniors Gary Parentetu and Dan Toucan Skate
Beck, freshmen Ed Ostravich, Brian 619 E. William at State
Dremer, sophomore Steve Brandt (upper)
rounded out the top eight. Coach Ron AnnpAr
Warhurst was particularly pleased with Ann Arbor
the performances of the freshmen and 668-0311
the running of Beck. New hours!
Beck finished ninth overall in 22:3. tr hurs .
After two years of training difficulties, Tuesday through Thursday, 12 noon till i p.m.;
the Grosse Pointe native made a strong Friday and Saturday, 12 noon till m ght;
bid for a spot on the squad. Sunday 12 noon till 6 p.m.;
"Training with Bill (Weidenback) Closed Monday.
really helped me this summer," related Special day rates, overnight rates and best of all PARTY
Beck. "It got me in shape mentally as rates. Call for street skating party information.
well as physically. I'm ready," he ad -________________________________
d.ried.
PARTHENON GY S
&ea tauvat t
Nounwwww wwM Ow r1 Awui

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