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September 06, 1979 - Image 37

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-06

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday,- September 6, 1979-Page 9A

PSHEsARK
Ppeseuts

Tuition Schedules

RESIDENT
1978-79

NON-RESIDENT

Undergraduate
Lower Division
Undergraduate
Upper Division
Graduate
Medicine
Dentistry
Law
Business Admin.

$ 550

1
1

620
840
,380
.260
900
840

1979-80
$ 602
678
930
1,530
1,400
1,000
930

% increase
9.5
9.4
10.7
10.9
11.1
11.1
10.7

Undergraduate
Lower Division
Undergraduate
Upper Division
Graduate
Medicine
Dentistry
Law
Business Admin.

1978-79
$1,700
1,830
1,900
2,680
2,440
2,000
1,830

1979-80
$1-,820
1,960
2.040
2,950
2,680
2,150
2,040-

% Increase
7.1
7.1
7.4
10.1
9.8
7.5
11.5

Candidacy

480

540

12.5.

Regents up tuition 8.75%

rresenting acoustic fok music in a reloxe armospnere, trr h eArk snea the
most renowned clubs In the English speaking world.
THIS MONTH'S SCHEDULE INCLUDES:
7, 8-Peter "Madcat" Ruth-Blues harp, whistles, & stomps
9-Red Clay Ramblers-Old timey string band music
14, 15-Peter Bellamy & David SWarbrick from England-Con-
certina &electric fiddle (Fairport Convention)
17-Merle Travis & Jody Stecher-Travis, a country music hall of
famer & writer of "16 tons," "Smoke, Smoke, Smoke That Cigarette" and
"Dark as a Dungeon." Stecher on guitar, banjo, and sitar. Taught David Brom-
berg how to play guitar.
21, 22-Jim Ringer & Mary McCaslin-singer-song writers, country
western flavor.
28, 29-Fenunig's All Star String Band-Hammer dulcimer, piano,
fiddle
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT-AMATEUR NIGHT
ยข ' >
10-9 Mon.-Sat. Downtown
1-6 Sun. 207 S. Ashley
Bizarre & Unusual Plants
SEPT. SALE-Assorted Succulent & Foliage 10-50% OEF
663-3692
SU PE RB P LA NTS OF A LL K INI)S

By JULIE ENGEBRECHT
As is the case almost every year, the
University's Board of Regents hiked
tuition fees again this summer, with
this year's figures an average of 8.75
per cent higher than last year's.
The new tuition schedules, finalized
in July, resulted in a 9.5 per cent hike:
for . resident freshpersons and
sophomores, who will pay $602 per term
in 1979-80. In-state juniors and seniors
will be charged $678 per term, a 9.4 per:
cent increase over last year.
Non-resident tuition rates for un-
dergraduates will be up 7.1 per cent,
from last year, amounting to $1,820 per,
term for underclasspersons and $1,960.
per term for upperclasspersons.
IN ADDITION, each term students
will face other required fees to cover,
Health Service ($23), registration ($16),
Michigan Union and student space,
remodeling ($4.15), Michigan Student

Assembly ($2.92), school and college
student government ($.50), and a'
student activities fee ($1.50).
Some University housing rates were
also increased. Although rates for
University-owned family housing on
North Campus remain the same as last
year, dormitory and other single-
student housing rates were upped an
average of 6.9 per cent,
Dormitory services will remain
basically the same this year except for
residents of West Quad, who will have.
to obtain weekend meals in nearby
South Quad. The consolidation move
meant the fee increase for students in*
all dorms was about $12 less than it
otherwise would have been. The Regen-
ts last year killed an even more exten-
sive consolidation plan that would have
affected Couzens, Alice Lloyd, Stock-
well, and Mosher Jordan Halls on a full-
time basis.

U'sports programs
otstanding- Cainham

This year's dormitory rates are as
follows;
Single: $2,215.52, up $168.02; Double:
$1,868.21, up $108.71; Economy double:
$1,579.92, up $92.67; Triple: $1,648.02, up
$95.52; 'Triple suite: $1,868.21, up'
$108.71; Economy triple: $1,473.23, up
$84.98. Oxford housing rates increased
an average of eight per cent, while*
Fletcher Hall rooms rose 5.1 per cent
and Baits apartments increased an
average of 9.5 per cent.
ONE CRITERION used in setting the
in-state tuition rates is the average
tuition costs at comparable state
universities, according to Vice-
President for Academic Affairs Harold
Shapiro, who will be the new University
president Jan. 1. Shapiro added that a
major factor in determining the out-of-
state tuition rates is the level of tuition
among private institutions and more
prestigious state schools.
At the same time students are hit
with the tuition hike, University of-
ficials say that will be somewhat offset
by a $3 to $4 million increase in finan-
cial aid available to students in 1979-80.
Approximately 30 per cent of all
University funds come from tuition.
The rest of the money comes from state"
allocations (almost 60 per cent) and
private gifts.
This year, tuition increases are ex-
pected to add $5.1 million to the school's
general fund.
THE STATE legislature approved its
budget in July, allocating $146.37
million to the University for its 1979-80
academic year budget. The allocation
includes a 9.3 per cent ($13 million)
boost over last year's figure.
A seven per cent average increase in
the salaries of faculty and staff was
also approved along with the tuition
hikes. The salary raise is within
President Carter's wage and price
guidelines, according to ad-
ministrators.

The University, which receives more
private funding than most of the public
institutions in the U.S., is becoming in-
creasingly dependent upon private gifts
to maintain its reputation as a
prestigious University.
"A university like Michigan has got
lo raise more and more private funds if
it's going to remain great," said
University Director of Development
Wendell Lyons.
"Tuition will raise to the price where
few can afford to come (to the Univer-
sity), said Lyons, who solicits private
funding for the University. "You can
price yourself out of the business no
matter how great you are."
Private monetary support is expec-
ted to reach the $33 million mark this
year.

S II

rtel

Continued from Page
has been a major factor in our financial
success. We simply have more fans at
our games than anyone else.
At the present time we are selling
95,000 season football tickets and at-
tracting -crowds o cf over 104,000 per
game. That is unprecedented in
amateur or professional athletics
-anywhere in the world. This tremen-.
-dous demand at our football games has,
however, resulted in a waiting list for
season tickets, and thus provides us
with some serious . problems. When
people, for instance, do not give up their
tickets, how do we accommodate
graduating seniors who wish to see the
games; and how do we take care of new
faculty and staff appointments in our
stadium? One cannot take tickets away
from one group of people to provide new
applicants with seats. That is one of the
most serious problems that the
Michigan Athletic Department must
face.

On the other hand, we are more for-
tunate with the above situation than we
were 11 years ago when we consistently
had 45,000 empty seats at our football
games. Despite demands we have had
no difficulty providing football tickets
for the students who wish to attend our
games. We simply make tickets
available to them before selling to
anyone else. That is the primary reason
that we have had to shift our ticket
distribution for the student body to the
spring of the year when staff, alumni,
and faculty have always had to pur-,
chase them.
1 hope you will all take advantage of.
the great contests that we have in Ann
Arbor in the Michigan Stadium and
other arenas.

611 Church Street
Ann Arbor, Mi. 996-2747
feast
f rost
frolic.

The University of Michigan's
Oldest Film Society
CINEMA GUILD
Sponsor of the A' Film Festival
Showing Films
EVERY NIGHT OF THE WEEK
Beneath CRISP at Tappan & Monroe
WATCH FOR FALL SCHEDULEI
our first two

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$1.50 Adults
$1.00 Kids

nights will be
FREE

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Ulrich's: the student
calculator center.
We stock the complete lines in
Hewlett-Packard, Texas Instruments, and Sharp calculators.
Whether you need the most basic or
the'most sophisticated calculator, we have it.
We understand what we sell,
so we can assist you in selecting just what you need.
We're competitive.
In fact, we'll match any deal or refund your money
Don't be disappointed.
Come in and get your calculator early.

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