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September 07, 1979 - Image 134

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 6-B-Friday, September 7,1979-The Michigan Daily
Heating oil shc

WASHINGTON (AP) - People who
beat with oil shod be able to get all the
fuel they need this winter but will pay at
least 50 per cent more than they did a
year ago, the Carter administration
said Wednesday.
"There may be many people in our
country who will be faced this winter
-with a cruel choice between food or
heat," departing Deputy Energy
Secretary John O'Leary told a
congressional panel.
O'LEARY AND ether administration
officials testified at a hearing into the
status of U.S. heating oil supplies. The
session was held jointly by two House
energy subcommittees.
The officials denied that the sale of
two million barrels of kerosene and
heating oil to Iran would noticeably af-

feet U.S. supplies of these fuels or that
the transaction constituted "black-
mail."
And they disputed news reports in-
dicating that Iran planned to re-sell the
fuel at a profit.
"Iran will use every drop of that oil,"
State Department official Henry Precht
asserted.
PRECHT SAID reports to the con-
trary seemed aimed at home consum-
ption in Iran and do not reflect the
reality of the situation.
O'Leary reiterated administration
claims that the fuel exported to Iran
equalled only about three days worth of
crude oil imports from that nation, now
estimated at roughly 750,000 barrels a
day.

ould be plentiful
"This was not blackmail.. . It was However, O'Leary also testified tha
part of the cement of rebuilding good the price outlook is bleak. "It is clea
relationships with this country (Iran) that there has been a significant in
that will be so important to us in the crease in heating oil prices over las
future," O'Leary said, winter's level," he said.
EARLIER FEARS of a heating oil O'Leary said the national averag
shortage this winter have been all but has already climbed to 80 cents pe
eliminated, said O'Leary, 'whose gallon, a 27-cent increase - or 51 pe
resignation as the nation's No. 2 energy cent rise - over the December 197
official takes effect later this month. price.
"Industry is building stocks at a O'LEARY'S TESTIMONY coincide
faster rate than last year," and with the release of a new Libraryo
President Carter's goal of having 240 Congress study which compared th
million barrels of heating oil and diesel current 80-cent-per gallon price wit
fuel in reserve by October will be met, last September's average price of 4
he predicted. cents a gallon.
O'Leary said that will take care of Of that total one-year increase, onl
even a severe winter. 14.8 cents can be attributed to highe
WHILE THERE may be some spot crude oil costs, the report alleged.
shortages that will be handled on a Thus, the industry has charged col
"case by case" basis, there should be sumers some $1 billion more in highe
no major shortages this winter like the prices than can be justified by highe
shortages of gasoline earlier in the crude costs and general inflation, th
summer, he said. report concluded.

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is preserved on
36mmU4ROMFU
The Michigan Daily
420 Maynard Street
AND
Graduate Library

BUT O'LEARY said that despite the
sharp price increase, there is no hard
evidence that oil companies are
engaging in price-gouging - even
though he said refinery profit
"margins" do seem to be increasing.
He said the administration will shor-
tly ask Congress for an additional $150
million over the $250 million already
appropriated for energy assistance for
low-income families.
O'Leary also said there should be
enough diesel fuel supplies to go around
to keep farmers, truckers and
homeowners happy - but that none of
these groups will receive special con-
sideration.
In another development, Carter's
long-range energy proposal for $88
million in federal subsidies for syn-
thetic fuel development came under at-
tack before a Senate panel.
Private consultants said that
Congress should avoid establishing a
crash program to develop a domestic
synthetic fuels industry.

Pillow Talk Daily Photo by JIM KRUZ.
of the South Quad Welcoming Committee assists a recent arrival at

A member4
the dorm.

_- --

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'U' Law Prof. likely
AppelateCourt j'urist
By TOM MIRGA significance.
University Law School Professor Last March, Edwards was one of nine
and labor law and arbitration specialist finalists recommended by a judicial
Harry Edwards has been selected for nominating commission for two vacan
appointment to the U.S. Sixth Circuit cies on the appeals court bench, but wa
Court of Appeals in Washington, the passed over at that time.
Justice Department has indicated. IF HIS appointment is confirmed
If the nomination by President Carter Edwards will fill a vacancy on the 11
is confirmed by the Senate, the 38-year- member court created by the recen
old professor will become one of the decision of Chief Judge David Bazelor
youngest jurists sitting on a U.S. ap- to assume senior status, or a semi
peals court. Edwards' appointment is active role in court affairs.
pending formal clearnace by the A member of the University's la
Federal Bureau of Investigation and faculty since 1970, Edwards was electe
the American Bar Association. chairman of the board of Amtrak i
"I'M HIGHLY gratified to know I'm April. He had first been appointed b
under serious consideration," he said, Carter as an Amtrak board member i
"but given the posture of this situation, 197
I am in no position to make any further A 1962 graduate of Cornell Univer
comments." sity, Edwards received his law degre
The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals is from the University in 1965. He serve
considered one of the most influential on the Michigan Law Review and was a
courts in the nation, second in stature member of the Order of the Coif, a
only to the U.S. Supreme Court. It deals national legal honor society.
primarily with cases of national Before joining the University's la
faculty, he spent fivc: years with a
Chicago law firm and later served o
the Harvard Law School faculty fro
1975-77.
Edwards was also among a group o
lawyers designated to serve on the
American Bar Association's Com
mission on Law' and the Economy
which recently issued a widely-know
report on "Federal Regulation: Road
to Reform."
Van driver
to face trial
in death of
'U' student
By TIMOTHY YAGLE
An Ypsilanti man, charged with th
death of a University student in July, i
scheduled to stand trial in Washtena
County Circuit Court October 15 o
charges of manslaughter.
Mark McCleary, 25, is accusedo
striking and killing 30-year-ol
graduate ethnoarchaeology studer
Jane Sallade on July 20 with his 19
Ford van. The southbound vehic]
swerved off the road and struck Sallad
as she was walking across the media
on North University Ave. near Churc
St. The impact threw Sallade nearly
feet toward the University shuttle b
stop.
McCLEARY STOOD mute at a pr
trail hearing August 29.
According to Ann Arbor police, t
van bounced between the sidewalk an
--1 the street for nearly 60 feet before hi
ting the Carbondale, Ill. native.
Considered "an unusually brillian
student by her colleagues and wide
published, Sallade was preparing hi
doctoral dissertation on land use pl
terns in Cyprus, which University o
ficials said would have been the fir
paper of its kind published in the cou
try.
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