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December 09, 1979 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-12-09

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, December 9, 1979-Page 5

Greene announces Council bid,
cites need for more 'U' housing

(Continued from Page 1)
money either raised through increased
taxes or from sources outside the city.
Greene, for instance, blasted the
University for refusing to build more
housing.
"The University has some respon-
sibility here, and I don't think they can
continually stick their heads in the sand
and say 'we're not going to build
anything because student enrollment is
going to go down, as the nation's
populace ages," Greene said.
GREENE SAID yesterday that
money could be redistributed in the
city's budget without detracting from
the other city services.
He cited the case of the University
Child Care Action Center, which has
been forced to move from the School of

Education Building due to fire code
violations in that building.
Greene proposed that the city should
involve itself, as he has done, in finding
a new home for the child care center.
"In that case, for instance, it's not a
matter of a lot of money to the city," he
said.
IN ADDITION to these issues,
Greene proposed:
" Increased spending for sidewalk
repairs;
. A planning review committee of
citizens to lobby the city's planning
commission on land-use questions.
Greene said the committee was already
in the works;
" Tenant safety ordinances. One such
ordinance that Greene has worked on
would require landlords to install bolt

locks on rental units;
" A city council for the arts;
" The expansion of the Model Cities
Dental Program to include more social
services;
" Increased police protection;
" And a solid waste shredder.
Greene said his campaign
organization, headed by city
Democratic Party member Eunice
Burns, included more than 80 campaign
volunteers. He said his campaign would
pick up momentum after Christmas
vacation.
Meanwhile, Stephanopoulos' cam-
paign manager, LSA junior Cande Lar-
son, said her campaign had a staff of 12
and over 60 volunteers and would also
begin serious campaigning after
Christmas.

reet i
. .. third Council bid

U probe alternative

health plan

(Continued from Page 1)
There are 'two kinds of HMO: In one
type, a group of physicians operates a
clinic or hospital, and enrollees pay a
set fee for health care. In the second
type HMO administrators would con-
tract with individual private
physicians, working out of their
separate offices.
Segadelli said a combination of the
two would be most likely for Ann Arbor.
AN HMO HERE, which would not be
limited to the University community,
would probably set up a clinic for office
visits and then contract with a hospital
to provide specialized care, Segadelli
explained.
One problem with setting up an HMO
here would be attracting enrollees to
the plan in its first year. Segadelli
estimates that eventually the HMO
would need 25,000 enrollees to remain

solvent.
There are also legal problems. State
law prohibits a public body such as the
University from operating an HMO.
University chief financial officer
James Brinkerhoff said he doubts the
Regents would be willing to support
something financially that they did not
control.
PROBABLY THE touchiest problem
is what hospital to use. If the University
established an HMO, its enrollees
would occupy about 100 hospital beds
full time each year. That would mean
more patients for whatever hospital the
HMO chose to use.
And doctors say hospitals here do
compete with each other.
THE OBVIOUS choice would be
University Hospital. But University
Hospital is a specialized care/teaching

and research hospital. It does not stress
cost-effective care, as an HMO would.
If University Hospital were part of an
HMO, someone would have to pay for
the cost of educating physicians, accor-
Music School
acclaimed
The University's School of Music
has been judged one of the top music
schools in the country by represen-
tatives of its peer institutions, Univer-
sity Information Services reports.
A recent poll conducted by the
National Association of Music
Executives of the American
Association of Universities named the
University's School of Music as the only
unanimous choice among music
leaders.
Deans and directors of state-
supported music schools across the
nation were surveyed for the poll. In-
diana University, and the universities
of Illinois, Wisconsin, and Texas attrac-
ted the most votes behind the Univer-
sity, in that order.

ding to hospital administrators. The
HMO's rates would go up, destroying its
reason for being set-up in the first
place.
But according to Segadelli and
others, the University is highly unlikely
to set up an independent health care
organization that would compete with
its own hospital.
* UN

.°:

NEW ORLEANS (AP)-The "Latter-
Schlesinger Collection of English and
Continental Portraits Miniatures" has
been permanently installed in a
specially designed gallery at the New

TRAITS
Orleans Museum of Art.
The collection contains over 300
miniatures. The museum says it
"presents a balanced and comprehen-
sive survey of the history of this unique
art form."

5R
GCHANCE
X516 E. LIBERTYA

BUSH PURRING BUT BAKER'S HURTING:
Some GOP campaigns sputtering

WASHINGTON (UPI)-As time
grows short and pressure mounts, can-
didates in the high-stakes .shoot-out for
the Republican presidential nomination
are running into trouble with their
campaigns-some a little, some a lot.
The notable exception among the
major contenders is Texan George
Bush whose campaign is purring along
smoothly and has done well in Iowa,
Maine and Florida straw votes despite
a still-low recognition rating.
BUT OTHERS-Howard Baker,
Robert Dole, John Connally and Ronald
Reagan-have been hit with problems
of varying severity as the election
season moves closer to the first
caucuses and primaries.
The candidate most likely in trouble
is Senate GOP Leader Howard Baker,
hurting for money, forced to revise his
campaign strategy and undergoing
wholesale staff changes.
The 54-year-old Tennessean trails
only Reagan in public opinion polls, but
poor showings in Maine and Florida
straw ballots have hurt him.
BAKER HAS DECIDED to abandon
the Senate leadership and campaign
full time, concentrating on selected
caucuses and primaries-Iowa and
New Hampshire and Illinois among the
first.
Although Baker at one time was run-
ning second only to Reagan-a distant
second--in New Hampshire, Bush has
narrowed the gap and has been cam-
paigning almost daily in the Granite
state.
Dole, the 1976 vice presidential can-
St. Mary Chapel
Players
--

" " " " . ARNl i . ::. "^.'L+'r 1 N fy f.* M N+...... " AR rtMI .. N fN! 11 ( 1MliN! i k},

didate who has,
troubles, was hitI
week.

had nothing but;
by some more last

CAMPAIGN MANAGER Chuck
Bigler and press secretary Helen Smith
quit and eight aides in New Hampshire
jumped ship. Last summer, Dole fired
the consulting firm he had hired to run
the campaign.
State Sen. Raymond Conley, Dole's
operationstdirector in New Hampshire,
inldicated there was a serious rift bet-
ween Washington and state aides-a
frequent occurrence in national cam-
paigns.
Connally, who has yet to mount a
serious challenge to Reagan on the
right despite a $7 million kitty, also
cracked down..

20 of the 160staff members at campaign
headquarters. More staff cuts are in the
offing.
The move was described as a "belt
tightening" but could be offset as Con-
nally moves to beef up his field forces in
Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina
and Illinois.
Reagan, the acknowledged front-
runner, has had his share of
miseries-though they may be as much
personal as political.
Two close aides-Michael Deaver
and Lyn Nofziger-left the campaign,
losers inhpower struggles with John
Sears who has emerged as the chief
operative for Reagan.

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When an animal hibernates, the en-

tire metabolism slows down.
THE FORMER Texas governor Respiration, heart beat and body tem-
named a new office manager and fired perature all drop dramatically.

Wolverine Watchers!

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