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November 30, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-30

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Page 2-Thursday, November 30, 1978-The Michigan Daily
LSA-SG election
suit drOpped

Judge rules against
some mail searches

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662-7744
THE FOUR HUNDRED BLOWS
(Francis Truffaut, 1959) This is a beautiful film of a
boy unloved and unwanted at home who hits the
streets to lead a fugitive and precarious existence.
"A cinema that brilliantly and strikingly reveals the explosion of
fresh, creative talent . . a picture that encourages a refresh-
ment of faith in films."-N.Y. Times. 400 BLOWS includes a
classic ending made famous by Truffaut's camera technique.
Thurs. Nov.30 Mich. Union 7:00 & 9:00
SMOKEY AND THE BANDIT
BURT REYNOLDS stars as the Bandit and JACKIE GLEASON plays
Smokey. Gleason tries to prevent Reynolds from driving a truck
of Coors beer from Texas to Georgia to collect an $80,000 reward.
"It's all action, laced with C. B. communication and made solid
with those sterling personalities, Reynolds and Gleason."-N.Y.

By JULIE ENGEBRECHT
Members of the United Students par-
ty decided yesterday to drop their suit
which contended procedural and
mathematical errors were committed
by election officials in counting ballots
for the Literature, Science and Arts
Student Government (LSA-SG) election.
TUesday night the LSA Academic
Judiciary ordered a recount of last
week's elections because of "the
possibility of irregularities in the.
tallying procedure.".
ACCORDING TO acting co-
chairperson Carl Parisi, the Judiciary
will meet again this afternoon to decide
whether to allow withdrawal of the suit.
Parisi also commented on a
statement by a judiciary member
charging the talliers were incompetent,
and said the charges against Elections
Director Harriet Strasberg are unfoun-
ded.
"The member was totally ill-
informed about the tone of the decision,
and the opinion of the Judiciary was not
an attack on the talliers; the decision
was because of the possibility of
irregularities," said Parisi. "Everyone
on the Judiciary was upset about the
statement, because our decision did not
criticize those involved."

STRASBERG WAS not surprised the
United Students brought the suit,
because they hassled officials
throughout the election, she said.
Party member Bianca Johnson, who
was defeated in the election, said party
members were upset with the way the
counting was handled, and also
strongly disagreed with the preferen-
tial voting system, a balloting system
which only one LSA-SG official under-
stood.
Johnson also said the suit was drop-
ped because the United Students wan-
ted to get busy with their programs.
"The suit would take a long time," she
said, "and we wanted to get busy with
other things."
"After the Judiciary meeting, mem-
bers probably understood the system a
little better," Strasberg said, "and they
realized it would probably come up the
same way again, they dropped it."
Strasberg was surprised the recount
motion was dropped.
One LSA-SG official charged the
United Students' suit might have been
spurred by Michigan.Student Assembly
member, Irving Freeman, for political
reasons. Other members of the United
Students could not be reached for
comment.

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) - A federal
judge ruled yesterday that it is uncon-
stitutional for the FBI and other agen-
cies to authorize scrutiny of mail
without a more specific purpose than to
"protect the national security."
"National security is too ambiguous
and broad a term. The memory of the
lawlessness that masqueraded as
'national security' searches is too close
to the memory of this court," said U.S.
District Judge Lawrence Whipple, in an
apparent reference to the Watergate
scandal.
WHIPPLE emphasized, however,
that his ruling "in no way affects mail
covers based on criminal or fugitive in-
vestigations."
The ruling involves the practice by
investigative agencies of instituting a
"mail cover," in which postal officials
note the return address and other in-
formation appearing on the face of
mail. The packages and envelopes are
not opened.
Although the FBI "has altered and
considerably tightened their
guidelines," Whipple said he wanted to
be sure all investigative bodies halted
the practice.
"INVALIDATING a regulation 'on its
face' is strong medicine," the judge
said. "Nevertheless, itis the only'cure.
The ruling came in the case of Lori
Paton, 21, formerly of Chester, who

filed suit against the FBI five years a
because the agency investigated her
ter she mistakenly wrote a letter to t
Socialist Workers Party. Miss Pato
now a resident of Arlington, Va., sa
she had wanted to obtain informati
from the Socialist Labor Party for
high school social studies project.
AS A RESULT of her letter, the F
investigated Miss Paton and began
file on her when she was 15 under
classification that indicated "subve
sive matter" was contained. Ev
before yesterday's ruling, the agenc
had agreed to destroy Miss paton's fil
The decision yesterday was limited t
the constitutionality of the mail cov
procedure and did not decide the enti
suit.
THE MAIL cover on the Sociali
Workers Party was instituted in 1973
then-acting FBI Director L. Patri
.Gray. An FBI memo recommending
noted the "SWP has been able to play
major role in promoting antiwar a
tivities. . . this mail cover will identi
new SWP members and sympathizer
establish foreign contacts, develop i
formation concerning financial cox
tributors and greatly assist in dete
mining the identity of employees of ti
SWP national office."
Miss Paton could not be reached fc
comment.

Tsemel blasts Israel's

Palestinian plans

Post.
Fri. Dec. 1

Nat. Sci. Aud.

7:00 & 9:00

(Continued from Page 1)
Sami Esmail trial, saying that the MSU
student who was convicted by an Israeli
court for his pro-Palestinian activities,
was treated better than most Israeli
political prisoners.
"He was treated differently," Tsemel
stated, "because of strong American
support. In spite of that, he was still
abused." She listed Israeli security for-
ces' torture methods, and said they had
no moral restrictions on using such
brutal means to achieve their desired
goals.
"Israel will not give back the West
Bank-there is no doubt about that. It is
all part of the big Zionist dream. But
Israel has 1.5 million Palestinians stuck
in her throat, and doesn't know what to
do," Tsemel said.
Tsemel said President Carter is
reluctant to put added pressure on
Begin'to give up control of the occupied
territories. She said the Carter ad-
ministration needs a strong Israel to
maintain its presence in the Middle
East.
"It's a fact that the U.S. regime can-
not rely upon Egypt for support. Saudi
Arabia is a good friend, but not in the
long run. And Iran, a former stone in
the fortress, is trembling," she said.
"America's only strong support comes
from Israel, and Begin knows that, and
can use it to his advantage."
Tsemel claimed Israel "plays the
role of the Marines for America."

-and-
SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER
(Francois Truffaut, 1960) Truffaut followed 400 BLOWS with this
off-beat gangster comedy that shook up critics and audiences
alike. A concert pianist, seeking obscurity in the lower depths of
Paris' underworld, falls in love while thugs try to ferret out his
criminal brothers through him. The rapid direction and shifts of
mood and pace are bound to keep you on your toes as Truffaut
makes some personal and pointed observations on success and

price.
Sat. Dec. 2

Nat. Sci. Aud.
ADMISSION $1.50

7:00, 8:40, 10:20

E

Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBE
LIA TSEMEL, an Israeli lawyer and supporter of Palestinian activities in her country, answers questions from the audience
after lambasting her government's actions concenring the West Bank and other related matters. Tsemel spoke to a crowd
of about 100 in the Union's Pendleton Room last night.

CAMP DAVID: PERSPECTIVES
November 30, 1978
Sponsored by the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and The
Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies of the University of Michigan.
EQBAL AHMAD: Washington, D.C.
RAGAEI EL-MALLAKH: University of Colorado
MALCOLM KERR: U.C.L.A.
BERNARD LEWIS: Princeton
ITAMAR RABINOVICH: University of Pennsylvania
1-3:30 RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
CAMP DAVID: MIDDLE EASTERN PERSPECTIVES
3:45-5 RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
CAMP DAVID: ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES
8-10:30 RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
U.S. FOREIGN POLICY AND HISTORY:
THE CASE OF CAMP DAVID

AATA progresses in
future transit change

(Continued from Page 1) _
The board prepared itself for its
task of translating these ideas into
reality by conducting several
workshops with transportation plan-
ning experts and viewing two films
which introduced the board to the more
technical side of urban planning.
PERHAPS it was this new
awareness of the complexities which
led the board to hire on November 1 a
private consulting firm for $15,000. The
consultant arranged two special Satur-
day workshops during which the board
discussed and then ranked various
criteria which it wished to incorporate
into the UATS amendments. In-
terestingly, despite a deficit last year of
nearly $500,000, cost efficient service
only ranked sixth out of the 20

priorities. The top goal stressed higi
levels and quality of service.
The consultant relied on these ranked
priorities to develop several alternativ<
transit concepts. These proposals werE
supplemented by two other developed
by local citizens groups, the Ecology
Center and the Citizens Association fo
Area Planning (CAAP). It was thesE
eight alternatives which the public wa
asked to address last night.
Richard Hocking, AATA's con
sultant, observed "the general tone o
the alternatives" appears to be reduc
tion in Dial-A-Ride.
Tom Hackley, AATA planning coor
dinator indicated other discrepencies
between the eight alternatives, besides
level of Dial-A-Ride, were the degree o:
frequency of service and dependance
on transfer points.
Hackley also said "all the alter
natives are expansive," ranging in ser
vice hours increases from 10-70 pei
cent. He admits he does not expect to
get sufficient funds but the idea is "t<
implement as much as possible each
year," consequently some of the more
extensive systems "are unlikely to be
fully implemented by 1990." Board
chairman Ed Pear reiterated "the
boards's firm commitment to main
taining current levels of Dial-A-Ride fo
senior citizens and handicapped.

4J

on,

Beth Delad
500 E. Liberty
Just off State

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2nd nnual Midnight Madness Sale
10% off regular price on all SWEATERS
WOOL SKI CAPS reg. $6.50 Only $3.99
20% off regular price on all RACQUET BALL EQUIP.
Men's Rosse DOWN SKI JAC reg. $86 Only $74.95
COTTON FLANNEL SHIRTS reg. $15 Only $8.95
LADIES PROFILE SKI JAC reg $56 Only $49.95
DOWN JACKETS starting at Only $39.95
SAVE FROM $10 to $25
100 DOWN VESTS at Only $24.95
VALUES to $42.50
ODDS AND ENDS RACK
-Limited Selections-Great Prices
Converse irregular BASKETBALL SHOES

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