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November 28, 1978 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-28

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Page 6-Tuesday, November 28, 1978-The Michigan Daily
University of Michigan
Gilbert & Sullivan Society Presents

SIEGE, DRINKA THON LASTS 8 HOURS

November 29, 30 December 1,2 1978
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
For ticket information
call 994 -0221 After Nov. 25.763 -1085

Vet holds
From Wire Reports
WYANDOTTE-An unemployed Vietnam veteran
demanding hospital treatment for depression
yesterday held 10 bar customers hostage for eight
boozy hours. The seige turned into a drinking party as
drinks were on the house, and five of the hostages
turned down a chance to leave, police said.
The gunman, identified as Gary Cornell, 35, of
Wyandotte, surrendered after talking to a reporter
and releasing all the hostages unharmed but slightly
innebriated. One hostage staggered and fell as he left
the bar and had to be helped away by police.
CORNELL, WHO complained of being in a

"depressed state," was taken to the rehabilitation
unit of Wyandotte General Hospital by police
ambulance following his surrender. Police said no
decision had been made on criminal charges in the
case.
The siege at Bill's Corner Bar began at 2:30 a.m.
Cornell apparently had been drinking at the tavern,
went out to get his rifle from his car and returned to
announce that he was making the 10 people there his
hostages.
He also ordered drinks on the house for all for the
duration.
A LENGTHY STANDOFF with police ensued, and
shortly after 5 a.m., one of the hostages-apparently

the barmiad=telephoned The Detroit News to ask for
help.
The gunman himself spoke with News morning
editor William Clark. Cornell apparently wanted to
surrender, but wanted a reporter with him when he
did. The News sent religion writer George Bullard,
the closest to the scene.
Cornell surrendered after a 20-minute drink and
chat with Bullard.
Cornell earlier had given his loaded .22-caliber rifle
to his brother, Ronald, who was called to the bar by
police. Ronald Cornell emerged to tell shotgun-toting
officers, "There are five drunks in there. They don't
want to come out. They love Gary."

hostages, beer party

F

6
..
U'
J

Have Lunch
*at
BELL'S
Try our great
pizza and grinders
S. STATE AND PACKARD
995-0232
FREE Delivery doily after 4:30
SUN-WED: Opentii 1 am
THURSDAY: til 2
FRI-SAT: il 3 am

PAC dominates LSA

Booze battle starts;

(Continued from Page 1)
student government to help turn the
school into an institution fighting for
human needs and important issues af-
fecting the lives of students," said
Warren.
The results of three ballot questions,
two of which are non-binding opinion
samples of LSA students, were not
available as the votes had not yet been
counted. Official results should be
available later today.
The first ballot question asks the
student body if it feels experiential
learning programs, such as Project
Outreach, Project Community, and in-
ternships, should continue to be ac-
credited for course work. The second

question seeks student input on an in-
crease in student government fees from
the current 50 cents to $1.
The third question, a proposed amen-
dment to the LSA-SG constitution,
would change LSA-SG elections from
twice-yearly contests to a single
November election.
Of the 1303 total ballots, Stechuk and
Friedman received 694 votes and
Student House Party candidates
Thomas Bohlmann and Corando
Carrizales received 252 votes. Some 35
write-in votes were cast.
The top Executive Council vote-
getters were Bruce Kozarsky with 131,
and Talib-Udin Abdul-Mugsit with 105.

age hike c
By United Press International
The battle against Michigan's
voter-approved drinking age hike
opened on two fronts yesterday.
In Detroit, an anti-Proposition D
group filed a class action suit
challenging the legality of raising
the drinking age from 18 to 21 on
Dec. 22. And in Lansing, State Rep.
Perry Bullard (D-Ann Arbor) in-
troduced a bill that would make it
only a civil violation for persons un-
der 21 to drink.
MAKING VIOLATIONS of the new
drinking age law a civil
violation-as opposed to a criminal
offense-means that persons under
21 caught buying or consuming
booze would be subject only to a $25
fine.

halien ed
Under the Bullard p'ro osal, local
communities would be able to pass
their own stiffer or more lenient
penalties for under-age drinking.
Use of a fake identification to obtain
booze would still, however, be a
criminal offense.
And in the suit-filed in Wayne
County Circuit Court by the
Michigan Committee for the Age of
Responsibility-is attempting to
block the new drinking age from
taking effect until a full trial can be
held on the merits of the issue.
The suit alleges that the new
drinking age' is a denial of equal
protection under the law since it
''arbitrarily" divides adults into
"two differently treated sub-
classes"-those over 21 who can
drink, and those 18-21 who cannot.

pI

GREETING CARD
CLEARANCE SALE
40% OFF
on most greeting cards, bows,
gift wrap, stationary, etc.

The high price of roses
(Continued from Page 1) -

?Owl .

Camera Shop, Inc.

(most major credit cards accepted)
1115 S. University Phone 665-6101

days and $226 on weekends.
Early reservations are the best bet
for keeping expenes down during the
holidays, according to Mary Burns
LUXO
PUTS
THE
LIGHT
WHERE
YOU
WANT IT
15% off on all Luxo lamps.
MORE THAN A BOOKSTORE
549 E. University

travel consultant for Great Places
Travel, 216 South Fourth.
"Many flights are already filled,"
Burns said. "Most advice I could give
now is irrelevant."
SHE SAID RETURN flights are the
hardest to get because they have been
booked well in advance to take advan-
tage of special rates.
Other discounts are available at rates
reduced up to 20 per cent. To take ad-
vantage of that rate, one must book the
flight seven days in advance, stay over
Saturday night at the destination, and
return within 45 days. Using this
discount to Los Angeles, the cost for
traveling between Monday and Thur-
sday is $301 and $320 on weekends. The
cost on the week nights is $263, and $282
on weekends.

3
l

Vietnamese refugees

maycome
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP)-
European nations are hedging on com-
mitments to take Vietnames refugees
from the freighter Hai Hong, and that
means more than 1,000 of the 2,500 may
come to America, diplomats said
yesterday.
Malaysia has said the United States
agreed to take those who cannot find
havens in other countries.
IN WASHINGTON, Justice Depar-
tment officials said Attorney General
Griffin Bell is preparing to propose that
the number of Vietnamese refugees to
be accepted in the United States within
the next five months be increased from
25,000 to 47,500.
C4S
The Lakeside Studio
Original Prints
One Day Exhibit & Sale
Old and Modern Masters
Wed. Nov.29 Tuft- Fri. 10-6
10 A.M.-4PM tSun.12-5
764-3234
FIRST FLOOR MICHIGAN UNION

to U.S.'
Bell previously approved 25,000 ad-
missions, filling the immigration quota
for Southeast Asia for the current year,
and it was announced last week this
would be increased by 2,500. Now, ac-
cording to the Justice Department of-
ficials, the quota would be expanded by
22,500 instead of just 2,500.
The dilapidated freighter Hai Hong
anchored off Port Klang, 20 miles west
of Kuala Dumpus, on Nov. 9. But
Malaysia would not let the refugees
ashore and threatened to two the ship
back out to sea. It said the refugees had
paid $5 million for the freighter to take
them from Vietnam;, and since. they
bought their way out tho vy re not true
refugees.
MOST OF THE Vietnames are of
Chinese descent, and are among
thousands of ethnic Chinese fleeing
Vietnam because of the feud between
China and Vietnam. Tens of thousands
of other Vietnames fled after the U.S.-
backed government in South Vietnam
was defeated by Communist-led forces
in 1975.
Malaysia allows refugees who arrive
in inseaworthy boats to stay in transit
camps. until homes can be found for
them in other countries. More than
40,000 refugees are packed into the
camps now, and for the past two weeks
new arrivals have come in at about 500
a day.
Angry villagers stoned a beached
refugee boat yesterday at the eastern
city of Kuala Trengganu, and shouted
to the refugees not to try to come to
Malaysia. The Vietnamese took refuge
below decks and the mob left at dusk.

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at MLB 3
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26
THE KING OF HEARTS
(Philippe de Broca, 1967) 7 & 9--MLB 3
Our most popular film. A Scottish soldier during WW I is sent to a French town,
evacuated except for an asylum. Meanwhile the fleeing Germans have left a
time bomb. The asylum inmates escape, taking up various costumes and roles.
A very funny comedy and a powerful anti-war film. ALAN BATES, GENEVIEVE
BUJOLD. "Delightfully subtle satire-penetrating comedy encased in a most
beautifI film."-Judith Crist. In French, with subtitles.
T6morrow: THE CHEERLEADERS & INVASION OF THE BEE GIRLS

K-

By William Shakespeare
NOV 29 -DEC. 3

Pbwer Center
01
Tor

pens
,morro

PTP Guest Artist Series

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