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November 17, 1978 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Anti-shah protests flare in Iran

Rhodesia delays switch

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - Anti-shah
demonstrations flared in three provin-
cial cities yesterday but oil production
increased, showing signs of bouncing
back to normal after a crippling two-
week oil industry strike.
The most serious anti-shah demon-
stration in days was at Behbahan, in
southern Iran on the edge of the
Kuzestan oil fields. Troops there fired
on protestors shouting anti-shah
slogans. Five persons were wounded,
one critically, Behbahan police repor-
ted.
AT ISFAHAN, the site of a giant
Iranian air force base, police arrested
rioters after a bank branch and a
bookstore were set ablaze.
In the holy city of Mashhad, swirling
mobs were dispersed for the second
consecutive day by soldiers firing
automatic weapons in the air and
hurling tear gas grenades.
Tehran was quiet, with many troops
and tanks returning to garrisons at the
edge of the city.
AT A PROTEST led by mullahs, or
Moslem priests, in Isfahan Wednesday,
demonstrators carrying two open cof-
fins dropped them when troops hurled
tear gas grenades. Authorities repor-
ted, the "bodies" in the coffins got up
and ran to safety.
Demonstrators have carried coffins
with live "bodies" in them before as a
trick to incite unrest and create public
sympathy, police said.
The protesters and strikers are
Iranians seeking political reforms and
Moslem traditionalists who object to
the shah's Westernization of Iran. They
claim Western decadence has in-
filtrated Iran's Moslem society.

OIL PRODUCTION increased Thur..
sday by 200,000 barrels to a 24-your totals
of 3.4 million. Equipment is being;
brought back on line and wells are
being phased in gradually to bring daily
production up to the normal six million
barrels. Western sources said this will
take several days.

Strikes at major petrochemical com-
plexes in Shahpur, near the Turkish
border northwest of here and in
Abadan, in southern Iran, ended.
The 700 petrochemical strikers
walked out in sympathy with the oil
workers, who formally ended their
strike Monday.

Judge denies parole

to u asarte
VACAVILLE, Calif. (AP) - Mass
murderer Charles Manson was denied
parole yesterday after he told the state
parole board that he should not be
released from prison because he is
"totally unsuitable for that world out
there." He also denied ever killing
anyone.
"I didn't kill nobody and I didn't or-
der nobody to be killed," said the bear-
ded, shaggy-haired Manson, who
regaled the Community Release Board
with his comments for some three
hours.
HOWEVER, Manson added, "I'm
totally unsuitable for that world out
there. I don't fit in at all."
The 44-year-old Manson, speaking out
for the first time since his 1971 convic-
tion in the Tate-LaBianca murders,
alternately sat and stood, waved his
arm in exclamation and even half sang
during his presentation.
"I'm mad," said Manson, who is ser-
ving a life prison sentence.
"I'M NOT YOUR executioner," Man-
son said at another point. "I'm not your

s vanson:
devil and I'm not your God. I'm Charles
Manson."
"I'M MAD; I'm indignant. I'm mad
to every bone in my body that I have to
come back to the penitentiary when I
didn't break no law."
He denied, as he had at his trial, that
he ordered members of his' roving
"family" to murder actress Sharon
Tate and six others persons in August
1969.
"I did not tell Tex Watson to do any-
thing other than what Tex thought was
right," Manson said of the young man
who acted as his lieutenant in murder.
Manson said that if he had wanted to
kill anyone, he would not have sent his
followers to do his work.
Manson, clad in baggy, dark blue
slacks and a light blue shirt, leaned
across the table, his face level with that
of the board members.
"IF I WANTED anyone killed," he
said softly, "I'd kill them myself. But
don't want anyone killed because I love
my own life. Does that make sense?"
He said he did not tie up Leno and
Rosemary La Bianca, who were slain
by Manson family members the day af-
ter the Tate killings. He said he did not
even remember if he was at the La
Bianca house that night.
"I've been pushed to madness in
prison," he explained at one point.
Conmittee
refuses to
review
Samoff
(Continued from Page )
"It's the same set of people who are
reviewing the same (facts) and by and
large won't change their minds,"
Samoff said, who came to'the Univer-
sity in fall, 1970.
Sam Barnes, chairman of the
Political Science department, says he
can't "envisage any circumstances"
that would bring the case up again. "I
think we have a fair set of procedures
and they worked in this case," he
stated.
BARNES SAID even those who un-
successfully voted to reopen the case
were satisfied with the procedure by
which the decision was made. The
chairman said members spent more
than two hours discussing the Samoff
case
Samoff's case can now be
reevaluated only on procedural groun-
ds through LSA channels and not on the
professor's teaching or research
abilities.
BUT MERVAT HATEM, a Political
Science graduate student and Samoff
Student Support Committee member,
said the case is "not at the end of the
road," and Samoff still has a good
chance for getting tenure.
"I think he has a case even on
procedural grounds," she said.
In his 15-page appeal, Samoff has
said he presents evidence that the
procedure by which his teaching,
research, and service were examined
"prevented a fair evaluation."

We have a thing
about billiards
Reduced rate
until 6 p.m.
every day
at the UNION

RemanaSectured engines
der Vnl. wnne

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