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November 17, 1978 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'U' Glee Club rates
in world competition

By JOE VARGO
The University has a reputation for
'inning teams, but ore of the top prize
getters-the 'Universty Men's ' Glee
Club-doesn't get mudirecognition.
The Glee Club is conidered one of the
five best amateur singing groups in the
world. This summer, it captured its
fourth championshiop of the Llangolen
Musical Eisteddfodd, an annual inter-
national music feitival in Wales at
which the best moral groups from
around the world attend. The Glee Club
also won the eveit in 1959, 1963, and
"IT SURE WAS exciting to win in
Wales," said Glee Club director
Leonard Johnson. "The competition is
the crucible fa Michigan Glee Clubs.
Everybody tried extra hard, and it was
nice to see theextra work pay off." Af-
ter the group won the competition in
Wales, the Glee Club performed in
Rome, Venice, and Paris.
In the pst decade, however, in-
terest in the glee club has waned. Ac-
cording to Johnson, ten years ago, glee
club concerts used to sell out Hill Aud.
Now the group's performance just
barely half-fills the auditorium's main
floor.
"Students are much more mobile
now," Johnson said. "There is a much

larger group of activities to choose
from-there is more competition for
people's time."
BUT THE LACK of student interest
doesn't shake Johnson's enthusiasm.
"I'm not as concerned about the num-
bers of people sitting in the audience as
I am about the quality of the concert,"
he asserted.
This Saturday night, the glee club will
host the Purdue Glee Club at Hill Aud.
So far, interest in the show seems to be
picking up as excitement builds for this
weekend's football bout between the
two schools.
Glee club president Neil Hediger said
ticket sales are going much better than
anticipated. "We seem to be enjoying a
rejuvenation," he said.
"This Saturday night, students will
see a freshapproach to exciting music.
They should come away loving music
more-it will be a memorable event,"
said Johnson.
Caves like Mammoth and Carlsbad
Caverns were formed by the movement
of water over thousands of years. Water
absorption of carbon dioxide from the
air and organic matter in the soil create
acids that seep into the rock. Other
caves, says National Geographic, are
formed by wind, ocean and volcanic
eruption.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 17, 1978-Page 5
Forum hosts debate
on nuclear energy
By SARA ANSPACH mathematics Professor Art Schwartz
said that although fatal accidents have
A forum on nuclear energy sponsoredno ocurd thehaebn
by the East Quad Energy Action Study not occurred, there have been
Group attracted an audience of over 200 situations ' when we werousty close to
people Wednesday night. the brink. It's a dangerous technology
Lasting four and a half hours, the o the standpoint of accidents
forum featured panel presentations THE NATION'S d fo
from members of the American enEy AaNhnee iorsnue ar
Nuclear Society (ANS) and the Arbor boenergy was lliance aother key issue. The Ar-
Alliance, an anti-nuclear energy. groupbrAlnc advocated conservation
Ancan aand research into alternative sources
on campus. as methods of meeting America's
DISCUSSION focused on industrial future energy needs. According to the
accidents. The ANS panel stated that ANS, however, nuclear power is an an-
radiation from nuclear plants has never swer t asdijr to thepbi."I'a rtntulgle limited supply of oil and
caused injury to the public. "It's a pret- natural gas.mtd upy foi n
ty good safety record," said John "Many people have forgotten that
Milandin, Director of Publicity for the nothing lasts forever," said Jim
Michigan chapter of the ANS. The risk Lagowski, supervisor of resources and
to workers is low also, added Roger facilities at Detroit Edison. "We need to
Sinderman, a Consumers Power use all the energy sources available:
physicist. coal, nuclear, and solar, if it comes to
Arbor Alliance, however, expressed that."ns
concern about accidents. "The problem IN ADDITION, the ANS panel talked
with 'the handling of radioactive about the impact of nuclear energy on
material is that we are learning aswe the environment, waste management,
go. When you learn as you go you can the ethics of nuclear energy, and the
look back and see where the surprises near explosion of Fermi I in Monroe.
(accidents) are, said University The Arbor Alliance mentioned that
physics grad student Doug Brown, the Rasmussen study, which said
"What distinguishes nuclear energy nuclear accidents are unlikely, has
from the other forms is that the ac- recently been termed "defective in
cidents can be catastrophic. many ways" by the Nuclear
Another member, University Regulatory Commission.

Ib~u r7 , T6Y Friday-Saturday
*j~1g III IIju6:30, 8:15, 10:00
- El Sunday
5:OC, 6:30, 8:15, 10:00

.

f

Faculty reassured of search involvement
(continued from Page 1)

SACUA member Jesse Gordon asked
the Regents to consider developing
"some kind of long-term plan for fun-
ding that catch up to salaries at other
institutions," in light of the fact that
funds from the state legislature are
tight this year.
vBUT THE REGENTS response
showed that they too feel constrained
by the lagging economy and the
passage of the Headlee proposal.

"You've got to bite the bullet," Dunn
said. "We can't provide above the
board increases when inflation is run-
ning the way it is."
Nederlander termed a tuition hike to
offset a faculty salary increase "un-
palatable" and noted the Regents were
seeking outside funds such as "en-
dowed chairs" to aid the faculty.
"We can only go so far with tuition, so
we have got to develop these outside

sources," Nederlander said.
Regent Thomas Roach (D-Grosse
Pointe) agreed that "We can give up on
the legislature" to stop the faculty

salary erosion, but added that the
faculty "won't get ready support from
this board for a ten per cent salary in-
crease."

'HONEST ABE'
CHICAGO (AP) - Abraham Lincoln,
the 16th president, who is credited with
having proved to the world that
democracy can be a lasting form of
government, is not unanimously

Regents
(Continued from Page 1)

he

The support of GEO, though endorsed
with applause from most of the spec-
tators, was voiced predominantly by
former GEO vice-president Marty
Bombyk.i
"THE UNIVERSITY ofMichigan has
rapidly gained the reputation of being
the J. P. Stevens of higlir education,"
she said.
Bombyk added that to continue the
case would be "callous intransigence"
and urged the Regents to "drop the
case and return to the bargaining
table."
Also included in the public comment
session was the endorsement of the
Sturgis Report by Michigan Student
Assembly President Eric Arnson. The
graduate student backed the report, but
he addressed one issue which was not
decided in the report: the future of the
hotel within the Udion.
ARNSON AD"OCATED transfor-
ming the rooms ito dormitory rooms.
''It is incongruous that student money
supports a hotel operation which
students don't use," he said.
Earlier in -he day the Regents,
reviewed a new report submitted by
Vice-President and Chief Financial Of-
ficer James Brinkerhoff and Vice-
President for Student Services Henry
Johnson which recommends that a
dining hall be constructed west of
Mosher-Jordan which-would be used by
all Hill area dormitory residents.
Save University Dining Systems
(SUDS) nembers Tom Clinton,
Michael O'Connor, Warren Thornth-
7waite, Gina Tonge, and Charles
Waterhouse spoke out against the food
consolidation plan.
WATERHOUSE TOLD the Regents
that inconvenience is not an issue in the
matter, but that student opposition is
focused on maintaining dormitory in-
dividuelity.
"There is a sense of belonging and a
need to express our personalities.
Resident halls have grown into in-
stitutions in their own right. They are

ar support for
places where one is recognized as an missary
individual," Waterhouse said: specializ
Tonge advocated looking into alter- ting a ce
native solutions to the financial food to e
problem. Regent
"WE (SUDS) BELIEVE there are said he w
other options which have not been con- examina
sidered thoroughly," she said. She in- plan)" b
troduced the possibilities of - a com- food con,

Samoff
which would mean
ing each kitchen or construc-
entral kitchen and moving the
ach dormitory dining room.
I Deane Baker (R-Ann Arbor)
would like to see "some further
tion of it (the commissary
efore making any decision on
isolidation.

FETED UNEVENLY
honored within that same category.
Only about 30 states in the United
States observe Lincoln's Birthday as a
legal holiday, according to The World
Book Encyclopedia.
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