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November 17, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Page 2-Friday, November 17, 1978-The Michigan Daily

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Chinese rings

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SPEECHES END PROGRAM:
Locals fast for world hungry

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By JULIE ENGEBRECHT
and STEVEN SHAER
A spirited noon diag rally with
activist Wavy Gravy and a break- the
fast potluck dinner with speeches by
Harvard University doctoral candiates
on world hunger ended the four-day
program sponsored by the Committee
Concerned with World Hunger.
Over 100 supporters fasted yesterday
to raise money for Oxfam-America, an
organization dedicated to helping un-

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123 W Washington, Ann Arbor

Monday - Saturday

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THE NEW
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Treat yourself to a pair of
the greatest new Bass
shoes ever. Sugarloafers.
Light. Plush. And un-
believably comfy.
With famous Bass
crafts manship inside
and out. Sugarloafers.
We've got'em!
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derdeveloped countries become self-
sufficient.
AT THE NOON rally, Wavy Gravy
recruited passersby to become involved
in a skit, which emphasized the problem
of world hunger. The skit focused on the
advantages rich Americans have over
the hungry people of the world.
Using the diag for his stage, Gravy
depicted the world as a global village of
100 residents, six of whom were
Americans owning half the village's
wealth.
- 'First Ward City Councilman Ken Lat-
ta; who attended the noon rally, said he
tried to reach Mayor Belcher in order to
encourage him to proclaim yesterday
as a city-wide Oxfam day, but the
mayor was unavilable on a hunting trip.
AFTER THE POTLUCK dinner at
Campus Chapel, Harvard public health
doctoral candidates Catherine Overholt
and James Austin spoke to the crowd of
about 100 on various hunger topics.
Overholt, a nutritional anthropologist
who travelled to China last summer,
explained how China solved its hunger
problem. She cited China's food
rationing program. "All people in
China can have three ample meals a
day," Overho4 said. "Some people in
rich countries can't even claim that,
and China has done it while poor."
Austin focused on various types of
nutrition programs used world-wide,
and examined different policies and
how they work. He also emphasized the
importance of nutrition education and
the world's attempt to attack the
economical, political, and biological
roots of malnutrion.
"You can't eat education, but it does
improve your ability to use the resour-
ces at your disposal," he stated.
"Education gives you independence
and increases control over the en-
vironment."
Austin closed the program stressing
the importance of a commitment to
meet the needs of the world's hungry.
lie said, "We must not forget them; we
must not remain silent."

Daily Photo by ALAN BILINSKY

STUDENTS WERE recruited by Wavy Gravy to dramatize the conflict be
tween Americans and the hungry of the world of the Diag yesterday. The ski(
was part of the rally presented by the Committee Concerned with World Hunger
in conjunction with the "Fast for a World Harvest."

Diggs' lawyer proposes sentence

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WASHINGTON (UPI) - Rep.
Charles Diggs' lawyer proposed
yesterday that, instead of going to
prison for his conviction in a payroll
kickback scheme, the congressman
should be sentenced to lecture high
school students on criminal justice.
Attorney David Povich said in a court
memorandum jailing, is not'necessary
because the Michigan Democrat,
already has received "sufficient
punishment" from widespread news
media coverage of his trial and from
the "devastating" impact of the case
upon him and his family.
DIGGS, 55, a founder, of the
Congressional Black Caucus, was con-
victed Oct. 7 of 29 counts of mail fraud
and filing false payroll vouchers in a
scheme to require his staff members to

HOURS
M-F 9:30-8
SAT. 9:30-6
SUN. 1-5

give him money from their padded pay
raises so he could pay off huge personal
debts.
Diggs, who has six children, faces a
maximum penalty of 145 years in prison
and a $128,000 fine.
DIGGS' constituents overwhelmingly
re-eledtedhin lastwek. n
Chief prosecutor John Kotelly is
arguing that U.S. District-Judge Oliver
Gasch should give Diggs a stiff senten-
ce reflecting "the seriousness of the
fraud and abuse of public trust.'1
Kotelly urged a sentence "consistent
with sentences imposed for similar
crimes" - one that does not create
"any appearance of special treatment
or favoritism."
HE NOTED that Rep. James
Hastings, (R-N.Y.), received a 20-
month to five-year sentence for his 1976
conviction in a similar scheme that cost
taxpayers a third as much money.
But Povich said Diggs should be
eligible for probation. While the
charges are severe, he said, "incar-
ceration for even a minimal duration is

too severe," and "we respectfully urge;
that Mr. Diggs should not be sent to;
jail."
"One sentencing alternative,"'
Povich said, "might be to combine-
probation with a fine and some form of:
public service, such as a minimum-
obligation to speak to, highs school}
students on subjects of the court's;
choice, such as, the crinal justice!
system.'
HE SAID Diggs' offenses were "less?
serious than most" committed by
congressmen, noting recent bribery,
conspiracy and perjury convictions:
that more strongly, threaten the:
legislative process.
Gasch has scheduled Diggs' senten-
cing for Monday.
General maps produced in the United-
States after 1850 showed railroad lines.
and omitted other roads, according tot
the Library of Congress. Only after the:t
automobile had established itself asa
significant mode of transportation did-
maps with roads for motor vehicles:
resurface again.

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You don't have to be nuts
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but it helps.
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You will have the opportunity t% order
from your Josten's College Ring Specialist:
DATF WED-FRL NOV 157

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