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November 11, 1978 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-11

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The Michigan Doily--Soturday, November 11, 1978-Page 7

Health Service Handbook

I!

QUESTION: With more and more
hing4 being found to be carcinogenic, I
as wondering whether anyone's
ed into deodorants? It seems to me
hat. applying something called
'aluminum dichlorohydrate" to your
rirpits every day might not be such a
ood idea.
ANSWER: Aluminum dichlorohyd-
ate, the active ingredient in the par-
icular anti-perspirant you use, is only
ne,.of, many such chemicals whose
burpose is to control wetness. In
veryday conversation we generally
ump all of the anti-perspirants and an-
i-ordor products into the category
'deodorants." However, they are two
lifferent things, the former being con-
,idered a drug by the Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) because if affec-
a function of the body (sweating),
'hile the latter is considered a
:osmetic because it attempts only to
nask odor. Many products contain both
he anti-odor and the anti-perspirant
gents.
Recently a panel of experts under-
ook a study of the anti-perspirant
hemicals'and submitted a report to the
DA. It found that a number of
hemicals, if in non-aerosol form such
s creams, sticks, and roll-ons, can be
afely used on a daily basis and are "ef-
ective" in reducing wetness. To be ef-
ective the chemical must produce at
east a 20 per cent reduction of wetness
n at least half of the subjects, as there
s often a wide variation in the effec-

tiveness of a given product among dif-
ferent persons. The panel found no
evidence of damage to the sweat glan-
ds, and normal sweating was resumed
usually within a week after use was
discontinued. No relationship to cancer
was mentioned in the report.
The FDA has not concluded that
aerosols are dangerous and has not
recommended that they be discon-
tinued. It will delay a' final judgment
about their long-term safety until more
studies have been done. Initial research
has indicated it may take years to clear
the lungs of ingredient particles which
may be inhaled when using the aerosol
and become lodged in the lung's tiny air
sacs.
The four groups of anti-perspirant
chemicals given the "safe and effec-
tive" label are: the aluminum
chlorohydrates (which your anti-per-
spirant contains), the aluminum zir-
conium chlorohydrates, aluminum
chloride, and buffered aluminum
sulfates.
Based on the above information, you
may decide for yourself to go with the
non-areosol products considered safe,
to use the aerosols that have not been
fully tested, or to eliminate the use of
these products altogether. There are
many people who choose the last alter-
native based not entirely on health
reasons but also on objections to the
notion promulgated by our society that
natural human body odors are un-
pleasant at best and unclean at worst.
Some feel that since each of us has our

own unique smell, perhaps less use of
such odor-masking products (and odor-
producing ones, such as perfumes')
would give more meaning to this impor-
tant indicator of identity.
* * * .
QUESTION: I am trying to lose five
pounds. How much food do I have to cut
out to do this?,
ANSWER: Explained in simple ter-
ms, to lose weigpt one must use up (ex-
pend) more calories than one con-
sumes. Completely cutting out some
foods (ice cream and other desserts, for
instance), eating less of each food in
your current diet, or modifying your
diet so that it contains more foods low in
calories, are three ways to do this. Ex-
pending more calories, such as by
bicycling, or running, or any other
exercise, works just as well for most
mildly overweight people (and may be
more fun!).
A pound of fat contains 3500 calories.
'Therefore, in order to lose one pound
you must use up 3500 calories more than
you consume. Through simple arith-
metic, to lose five pounts you must do
17,500 calories worth of exercise, or eat
this many calories less, or some com-
bination of both. It is recommended
that, whichever you choose, you do this
slowly, perhaps one pound per week.
SEND ALL HEALTH-RELATED
QUESTIONS TO:
THE HEALTH EDUCATOR,
U-M HEALTH SERVICE
207 Fletcher, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
(or via campus mail)'

They'll wheel and dealfor you
By SANDY OSTROWSKI
Want to do something different for
your friend's birthday?? Too tired to go
to the grocery store for a loaf of bread?
The bicycle delivery service Freewheel
Express can do it for you.
"Right now, we have a regular route
every day," said Gwen Boyer, a -
member. Using backpacks, double
baskets or buggers, ad copy for the Ann .
Arbor Observer, and realty papers
have been delivered. "I've even
delivered flowers to secret lovers,"
Boyer commented. Other items include 9 r
photographs, car parts, birthday cakes,
and chapatis (hollow bread).
IT ALL BEGAN as an idea at a con-
ference dealing with a small-scale ap-
proach to ecological problems. Reuben
Chapman decided to do something
about it. The result was a bicycle
delivery service called the Freewheel
Express that went into business May 2,
1977. A lot of hard work followed. To let
others know about the Freewheel Ex-
press, Reuben went door-to-door, con-
tacted businessmen he knew, and cir-
culated flyers.
So far;- the bicycle delivery service- Daily Photo by JOHN K
has managed to break even.r new cone IT'S NOT THE most sophisticated mode of transportation, but for memberso
tract was recently negotiated with the the Freewheel Express Delivery Service, the bicycle gets he job done. For
University which will be effective June modest fee, cyclists will make deliveries within a limited area.
30, 1979. The University will have
copying and photographic materials A
delivered. 1Te Ann Arbor Film ooperaiiv$ presents at MLB 3
An average delivery covers the SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11
distance from the CCRB to the SAB andOuTRAGEOUS
weighs fifteen pounds. It costs ap- 1UT2R-ALE U
proximately $1.50. This price varies, (Richard Benner, 1977) F, 8:40,10:24-MLS3
however, with weight and distance Fast on its way to becoming a cult film, OUTRAGEOUS is the story of a
from about 75# to 85t, and deliveries are friendship between a schizophrenic and a transvestite. Starring Craig
usually restricted to theacity of Ann Ar Russell and Hollis McLaren. "Russell's self -transformtions into Dietrich,
bor. Exceptions are made for regular Channing, Bankhead and Davis are hilarious and uncanny. "-NEWSWEEK.
customers and by the will of the "The dialogue is fresh and spirited, witty and lifelike."-John Simon.
delivery person. Monday: Samuel Fuller's THE STEEL HELMET & PARK ROW

:NQ;
of
a

EMS STILL DOMINANT FOLLOWING ELECTION:
GOP remains decided minority

NEW YORK (AP)-A two-party
rofile of the American voter reveals
epublican party officials have a lot
nore work to do at the grass roots if the
rand Old Party is to challenge the
)emocrats for political supremacy.
An Associated Press-NBC News poll,
onducted as voters were leaving
>olling places across the nation
ruesday, paints a troubling picture for
Eepublicans. In group after group of
be millions who voted this week, the
3OP remains a decided minority.
FROM ONE perspective, the
Republicans should be pleased by the
amus "only poll that counts," that is,
fuesday's elections.
In. state capitols, the number of
Republican governors jumped from 12
o 18. Victory in Pennsyvlania against a
new-breed Democrat was especially
sweet for the @. Still, most of the
gains' came in small states, and
Democrats once- considered vulnerable
were re-elected in California and New
York.
: Republicans picked up 12 seats in
the House, where Democrats held a 2-1
edge. But it was an average perfor-
ance at best'by historical standards,
"nce the party out of power almost
glways gains in off-year elections.
: In. the Senate, where Democrats out-
numbered Republicans 61-38 going into
Tuesday's balloting, today's scorecard
reads 58-41, with one independent.
: BUT THE BOTTOM line is voters,
"nd it is here that the Republicans look
eakest.
: Among all population groups,
tiroughout the nation, Democrats are
the party of choice.
No ,matter how you divvy up the
4merican melting pot, Democrats can
laim. majority support from Tuesday's
congressional vote.
The AP-NBC News poll found 38 per
cent of the voters characterized them-

/

selves as Democrats; only 23 per cent
said they were Republicans. Among the
32 per cent who consider themselves
political independents, Democratic
House candidates outpolled
Republicans 49 per cent to 44 per cent.
The poll, based on interviews with
nearly 35,000 voters, was the largest
single-day public opinion survey ever
conducted.
AMONG ALL occupation groups,
from executives and, professionals, 51
per cent to housewives and the unem-
ployed, 66 per cent, Democrats polled a
clear majority.
Democrats also did well among
religious groups. Sixty per cent of the
nation's Catholic voters went
Democratic in the House elections.
Among Jews, it was 68 per cent.
Protestants split their vote, with 48 per
cent going to candidates of each party.
Democrats piled up 85 per cent of the
vote from black Americans. Among
Hispanics, 78 per cent. Among Oriental-
Americans, 47 per cent. And among
whites, 51 per cent. The huge majorities
rolled up among black and Hispanic
voters are especially significant since
both groups are growing faster than the
U.S. population as a whole.
AMONG INCOME groups,
Republicans scored one clear victory:
gaining a 54 per cent to 42 per cent
preference among those who earn more
than $35,000 a year. Unfortuntely for the
GOP, the group represents just 12 per
cent of the electorate, and Democrats
swept the other income classes.
GOP candidates did claim small
majorities among several ethnic
groups, including the large U.S.-
German population, where
Republicans were preferred 51 per cent
to 45 per cent. A majority of Americans
of British and Scandinavian descent
also voted Republican, but Democrats
captured the greater percentage of

ethnics overall, winning' majorities
among the Irish, Italians, Orientals,
Hispanics, Blacks, Slaviks, Poles and
Russians.
And, finally, all age groups and both
sexes preferred Democratic can-
didates-by 46 per cent to 39 per cent
among females and by 52 per cent to 43
per cent among males.
As with every sample survey, the
results of the AP-NBC News street poll
can vary from the opinions of all voters
because of chance variations in the
sample.
For polls with nearly 35,000 inter-
views, the results should vary no more
than 1 percentage point either way
simply because of sample error.

Do a Tree
a Favor:,
Recycle
Your Daily

PETER O'TOOLE in

1972

THE RULING CLASS
This hilarious, bizarre and brilliant film is about Jack, a self-proclaimed
Godhead who inherits the 14th Earldom of Gurney. Dressed as a monk and
convinced he is Jesus, Jack arrives fresh from a mental institution to claim his
inheritance. When he realizes his relatives are plotting against him, he decides
to take his proper place in the House of lords and proceeds to attack all the
bastions of England's ruling class.
SUN: ALICE'S RESTAURANT

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7---- 9

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$154

MEDIATRICS presents
SLAUGHTERHOUSE FIVE
(George Roy Hill, 1972) Billy Pilgrim is unstuck in time. One
minute he is trapped in a German P.O.W. camp as Allied
bombers ruthlessly turn the city of Dresden into an inferno;
a moment later he is standing on the distant planet Tralfa-
madore,where he meets the buxom movie star Montana
Wildhack. Novel by Kurt Vonnegut. SLAUGHTERHOUSE FIVE is
the first American film to win the Cannes Film Festival Jury
Award. With MICHAEL SACHS and VALERIE PERRINE. Editing
by Dede Allen.

Family to pays $million
for heiress' release

Sat., Nov. 11

Nat. Sci. Aud.

7 & 9:00

Admission $1.50

MEXICO CITY (UPI) - The family
of kidnapped brandy heiress Brianda
Domecq de Rodriguez -said yesterday
she is well, her $1 million ransom has
been gathered and relatives are
awaiting final instructions from her
Marxist abductors.
Rodriguez, the 36-year-old daughter
of famed brandy-maker Pedro Domecq,
was abducted Tuesday by five masked
men near a shopping center outside
Mexico City.
POLICE SOURCES said the Septem-

ber 23rd Communist League, Mexico's
most active urban guerrilla group,
claimed responsibility for the kidnap-
ping in a note left in her car.
The kidnappers telephoned her
husband, Dr. Fernando Rodriguez
Campillo, three times, and also sent
him a note Thursday that was signed by
the kidnap victim, Galaxia Alcala said.
The note said she was unhurt and "for
no one to worry," he said.
Mexico State District Attorney Carlos
Curi Assad Thursday said police would
cooperate with the kidnappers.

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Human Rights In Taiwan
DON LUCE
Mr. Don Luce, Co-director and International Representative
of Clergy and Laity Concerned, will deliver an eyewitenss
account of human rights conditions in Taiwan.
Mr. Luce just returned from a fact-finding mission to inves-
K tigate the effects of nearly three decades of martial law on

SID
BOO
S HO

E
K
P

c nr nom

113 W Liberty

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