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November 11, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-11

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Page 2-Saturday, November 11, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Program aims at ending hunger

Church Worship Services

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UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCMS
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
111 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and 068-8720
. Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a. m.
-'Midweek Worship Wednesday at
100 p.m.
:Midweek Bible Study Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
1236 Waslitenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10 a.m.-Service of Holy Communion.
6 p.m.-Evening Worship.
U, * * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
;,CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.--663-9376
zX.,Theodore Kachel, Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-"Trying Times,"
b Rev. Ted Kachel.
;unday-5:30 p.m.-Student Fellow-
sp-, Discussion: "Evensong at Peter-
brough" by Philip Toyn ee, meet in
Cmpus Center lounge and bring brown
isupper. Beverage and dessert
pi gvided.,
unday-8 p.m.-Opening reading of
W 11. Auden's Christmas Oraporio play,
" or The Time 'Being." Meet in Cam-
p Center lounge.
The hours
jare long,
but that's
Sthe pay isP ulw
lousy.
But as a volunteer
you'll get to help America
stand a little taller. And you'll
stand a little taller yourself.
America needs your help or
we wouldn't beasking. Your
community 'needs your help.
People 18 or 80: we don't care
as long as you do. VISTA is
co ming alive again. Come alive
with us. VISTA. Call toll free:
800-424-8580. VISTA
A Pubhc Service of
This Newspaper &
The Advertisigng Councit

CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(AtBible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928
STUDENTS*
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9: 4a.m.
Worship-1i1:00 a.m.
For transportation-call 662-6253
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Supper at 6 p.m.
Followed by a program and discus-
sion at 7:00 on "Liberation Theology,"
Rev. Anne Broyles who has traveled'
and studied in Latin America will lead
us in a discussion on liberation
theology.
Sunday Bible Study: Love and Jus-
tice-9:30 a.m.
Monday Night Bible Study on North
Campus-8:00 p.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider
Graham M. Patterson
Services of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship meets at 4:00
p.m.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.-Campus Bible
Study in the French room.

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and .11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9 :30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R.Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Rev. Anne Broyles, Chaplain
Shirley Polakowski, Ofice Manager
Sunday-5:00-Song practice.
5:30-Worship Service. Followed by
shared meal.
ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
502 W. Huron
10:30 Sunday Morning, Nov. 12-
Topic title: "On Gilbert & Sulliyan"
by Harry Benford, faculty advisor to
the University of Mchigan-Gilbert &
Sullivan Society.
"Things are seldom as they seem,
Skim milk masquerades as cream."
-H.M.S. Pinafore.
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Daily-Mon.-Fri. 5:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m, noon, and 5p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
A meetinf for divorced Catholics
every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
Right of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5
p.m. onFriday only; any other time by
appointment.
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 SQith State St.
RevAndrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS:
11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopal-
ians at the Uni~versity of Michigan and
sponsors -programs in the arts which
have ethical or spiritual themes.
* * *
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.RB.C.

By STEVEN SHAER
In 1977, there was enough grain
produced in the world to fill every per-
son's daily nutritional needs, yet an-
nually over 450 million people die from
malnutrition, according to the Commit-
tee Concerned with World Hunger.
To inform the public of the
malnutrition crisis, the committee is
sponsoring a four-day program
featuring various speakers and films
beginning this Monday. The program
will conclude Thursday with par-
ticipants fasting and donating the
money they did not spend on food to the
committee.
COMMITTEE member Myra Isaacs
said the goal of the program is to show
University students that hunger exists
throughout the world, and that "even in
Detroit, hunger is inevitable for the.
people." She said the committee will,
contribute the funds to Oxfam-

America, a non-profit organization that
sends contributions directly to coun-
tries with self-development programs.
"We are concerned with ending world
hunger. Our primary goal abroad is to
assist development in rural areas
where the hungry live," said Joseph
Short, executive director for Oxfam-
America.
According to Short, Oxfam-America
is attempting to create support
throughout the United States for aiding
underdeveloped countries through self-
help organization. "There is a national
program involving groups in the United
States helping spread the word about
the hunger problem," Short said.
THE COMMITTEE is one of 1,200
groups involved in this program. The
committee was formed at the Univer-
sity around five weeks ago out of the
"frustration of a professor here who
wished to inform students about the
hunger problem," Isaacs said.

Isaacs asserted that there is a "myth
that exists where people believe that
countries are underdeveloped due to
the lack of resources, ignorance, and
over-population. The real reason is that
developed countries have stagnated the
growth of underdeveloped countries by
having the natives grow non-edible
crops such as tobacco and sugar.
"Our group will show that these
people can become self-sufficient,"
Isaacs said.
The committee maintains that with
the unequal distribution of resources,
the developed countries of the world
consume 60 per cent of the world's food
resources but comprise only six per,
cent of the world's population.rs
The committee plans to cover such'
topics as hunger in Detroit, U.S. foreign
aid and health in Colombia, and
nutrition policy and programs. All ac-
tivities will be held at the School of
Public Health, except a "break-the-
fast-potluck" at Campus Chapel.

LSA appoints new committee to
review state of honors program
(Continued from Page 1)

in "getting around" University
academic requirements.
English Professor and Honors
counselor Bert Hornback responding to
the survey question said, "The Honors
Council tries to help students achieve
educational goals. Sometimes this
means extraordinary fulfillment of
requirements.

"In my ten years as an honors
counselor, I have never seen a student
graduate without meeting all
requirements. I have often seen
students fulfill more than the
requirements."
The committee has several options
open to it other than recommending
elimination of the program.

"The cancellation option is very
benign," Jacobson said. "We could
even recommend a 50 per cent increase'
in the honors council budget, but I
believe we are not likely to be at either'
extreme."
The committee's final
recommendation is expected in'
January.

LSA-SG hopefuls set for race
(Continued from Page 1)

However, other presidential-vice-
presidential slates may be added to the
ballot. Current LSA-SG President, Dick
Brazee promised to bring the matter
before the council at its next meeting
this Wednesday night,
"It is our sense on council that we
would like some opposition on the
ballot. We'd like to promote com-
petition," Brazee said.
Stechuk, who said he would run "an
aggressive, all-out campaign no matter
what," is in favor of allowing other
candidates on the ballot.
"I think they should let the others on
the ballot," Stechuk said. "We are
trying to use the election to draw atten-

tion to LSA-SG."
All candidates for executive council
seats have a $50 spending limit on cam-
paign publicity to be used up until the
election on November 20 and 21.
Presidential and vice-presidential
slates and student organizations may
spend up to $80.
LSA students will also vote on three
referendum questions that appear on
the ballot.
One of the referendums changes the
length of the term an LSA-SG member
serves, from the present staggered
half-year and full-year terms to full-
year terms for president, vice-
president and all fifteen council mem-

bers. If passed, the rule would apply to
those candidates running in the current
election.
The other two referendum questions~
ask student opinion on whether "ex--
periential learning (Projects Com-
munity and Outreach and various in-
ternships) should continue to be gran-
ted credit in LSA" and whether studen-
ts wolild support an increase in their
college government assessment from
fifty cents to Qne dollar.
The LS&A Curriculum Committee, a;
faculty and student review group, is'
currently assessing the experiential
learning programs.

SUBSCRIBE TO
THE DAILY
Call 764-0558

No ink between the pill, defects

Earn 8 Credits This Spring
in NEW HAMPSHIRE
THE NEW ENGLAND
LITERATURE PROGRAM

MASS MEETING
TUES. NOV. 14
8pm
229 Angell Hall

for more information
PROF. WALTER CLARK
Dept. of English
764-0418 or 761-9579

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) - Use of
birth control pills before conception, or
during pregnancy, causes little if any
increased risk of heart defects in the of-
fspring, a four-year study shows.
Previous reports suggested a link
between use of oral contraceptives and
congenital heart defects in pregnancies
that might result despite use of con-
traception. But the Yale Medical School
study found no support for that
speculation in cases of women who
stopped taking the pill when they
became pregnant.
EVEN WHEN a woman continued
using the pill, either by preference or
unawareness of her pregnancy, the in-
crease of defects among children they
bore was insignificant, said Dr.
Michae-I Bracken, study director.
But women who use the pill and also
smoke a pack or more of cigarettes per
day while pregnant, are 13 times more
likely to deliver a child with heart
damage, he said.
Although the study didn't deal with
that phenomenon, scientists suspect
that the pill and heavy smoking com-
bine to affect the fetal blood supply.
AMONG WOMEN who have not used
the pill, an average of 10 in 1,000 live
births involve heart malformations.
The study of information on more
than 4,000 infants born in the New
Haven and Hartford areas showed that
the level of risk was about the same for

r -

pill users who stopped taking it after
becoming pregnant. For those who con-
tinued after conception, the rate in-
creased to 20 per 1,000 births.
But Bracken said the difference is
"not statistically significant."
ABOUT 300 obstetricians and pedia-
tricians took part in the study. Four
Yale research scientists evaluated the
results of interviews with 1,370 mothers
of infants born with heart defects and
with 2,968 mothers of healthy. infants.

Staff members of Yale-New Haven'
Hospital and the Hospital of St. Raphael
in New Haven, New Britain General
Hospital, Hartford and St. Francis.
hospitals in Hartford and Newington
Children's Hospital assisted in the
study.
It was funded by the National In-
stitute of Child Health and Human
Development. The results were presen-
ted recently at the annual meeting of
the American Public Health
Association in Los Angeles.

Man eating monkeys
terrorize Ethiopians'
NAIROBI, Kenya (UPI) - Hordes of take measures to protect the terrified
man-eating monkeys have killed and population.
devoured at least three persons and a There was no indication from Addis
great number of animals in southern Ababa Radio why the monkeys went or
Ethiopia recently, terrorizing the the man-eating rampage in the moun-
population, Addis Ababa Radio repor- tainous Sidamo region, which borders
ted today. Kenya.
Late in October, the roaming troop of For more than a year, Ethiopian
monkeys killed and then ate two boys, 9 troops and local guerrillas 'have been
and 10, the radio said. Earlier, a woman fighting pitched battles in the region
in the Sidamo region also was attacked and large areas of natural vegetation
and devoured, it reported. have been destroyed.
THE MONKEYS have also killed Monkeys typically subsist on the
large numbers of sheep and goats and vegetation and birds' eggs, which they
destroyed areas of cropland as they hunt in bands. It was considered likely
swept through, the report, monitored in the monkeys, starving because of the
Nairobi, said. lack of plant material, began attacking
Local committees have now appealed humans and smaller animals in
to the central Ethiopian government to desperation.

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