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November 10, 1978 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-10

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 10, 1978-Page 3

~t Yu SEE Ns tAPPECL 6DA&Y

Last chance to see autumn
splendor at Park Lyndon

'Twas a recondite student named Pete
Who could dine only with the elite.
When a lunch with the Dean
Introduced League cuisine,
He discovered the League was "tr's neat!"
B.B.
Se
TheA chigCanMa
I ail22
Next to Hill Auditorium Yo
Located in the heart of the campus. tic
it is the heart of the campus. . . on

Lunch 11:30to 1:15
Dinner 5:00 to 7:15
SNACK BAR
Lower Level
Open 7:15 AM to 4:00PM
nd your League Limerick to:
anager, Michigan League
7 South Ingalls
u will receive 2 free dinner
kets if your limerick is used in
e of our ads.

Shame on you
Fifty lashes with a wet diaper to the Ann Arbor News for its sexist
remarks Wednesday. Columnist Jane Myers, remarking on the fact
that women now are members of Air Force nuclear missile crews,
said "The hand that rocks the cradle will soon be able to push The
Button." But she added, "No cracks, please. Men have hormones,
too."
Take ten
It might be worth keeping in mind that our housing problems these
days aren't new. In the fall of 1968, 500 students were turned away
from dorms. Most of the 500 were either graduate students or transfers
who applied late to the housing office, perhaps because housing
officials had predicted vacancies for the year. They had said 250 extra
spaces would be available because of openings at the new Bursley
dorm.
Happenings
FILMS
A-V Services - Mind Over Body, 12:10 p.m., School of Public Health
IIAud.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - Herzog night: Aguirre, Wrath of God, 7
p.m., 10:20; Signs of Life, 8:45 p.m., MLB Aud. 4.
Cinema II - The Miracle Worker, 7 p.m., Lilies of the Field, 9
p.m., Angell Aud. A.
- Mediatrics - Camelot, 7, 9:45 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Chinese Community Organization/Fellowship - All in One
Family, 7 p.m.; Pure Love, 9 p.m., Union Basement Conf. Rm., 4, 5.
Gargoyle Films - His Girl Friday, 7, 9 p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall.
Cinema Guild - Spellbound, 7,9:05 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
PERFORMANCES
' Cecil Taylor unit - in concert, 8.p.m., Power Center.
Pendleton Arts Center - Poetry reading, William Matthews,
Faye Kicknosway, 8 p.m., Second floor Union Pendleton Center.
Residential College Players - Beckett's "Endgame," 8 p.m., R.
".Aud.
Musical Society - Vladimir Ashkenazy, English Chamber
Orchestra, 8:30 p.m., Hill Aud.
Ark - Moloney, O'Donnell, Irish Music, 9 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
MEETINGS
Nuclear Engineering 29th Anniversary Celebration - Glenn Knoll, 9
a.m.-7:30 p.m., Cooley Bldg. and Marriott Inn.
Middle East Studies Association of North America - 12th annual
Oleeting, Michigan League.
SPEAKERS
Guild House - "Political Oppression in Chile," Chilean exile Fr.
Martin Garate, noon luncheon, Guild House.
Non-Academic Career Counseling, Placement Office - "Building
Awareness of Functional Skills for the Non-College Teaching Job
Search," 3 p.m., 3200 SAB.
Philippine-American Lectures - "American Influences on
Contemporary Philippine Art," Forrest McGill, 3 p.m., Lane Hall
Commons Room.,
School of Education, Colloquia Series - "Career Patterns of
Distinguished Male Social Scientists," Prof. Robert Blackburn, 3-5
. m., Schorling Aud., School of Ed.
School, of Music - "The practical aspects of making a living
writing music," composer Gerald Marks, 3:30 p.m., 2020 School of
Music, North Campus.
Business School/AIESEC - "The Logical Selling Process," IBM
spokesman John Kalb, 4-6 p.m. Hale Aud., Grad. School of Bus. Ad.
Chabad House - "In Search of the King," 5 p.m., 715 Hill St.
Ecumenical Campus Center - "Post-Election Reflection: Ethics,
Taxes, and Big Government," Dr. James Morgan, 8 p.m., 921 Church
St.
MISCELLANEOUS
LSA-Student Government - The deadline for filing as a candidate
for L9A-SG is 5 p.m. today. Applications should be left at 3909
Michigan Union (MSA Office). Positions: President, Vice-President,
15 seats on Exec. Committee.
Hillel - Orthodox minyan, 5 p.m., Conservative minyan, 8 p.m.,
1429 Hill St.
International Students Recreation - 7-10 p.m., Sports Coliseum.
International Center - Trip to Cranbrook Institute, 2-6:30 p.m.,
sign-up for transportation beginning 8 a.m., Room 18, International
Center.
Christ Fellowship - Square Dance, U Reformed Church, 8 p.m.,
corner, Huron, Fletcher.
Scholarships for Undergraduate and Graduate Women -
Alumnae Council Scholarship applications for the 1979-80 academic
year, available from the office of the Director of Student-Alumni
Services, Alumni Association, Ground Floor, Michigan Union.
Deadline for obtaining application: December 15, 1978, 5 p.m.
",How sweet jt isn't
The 20-cent Hershey bar died yesterday, its parents, the Hershey
Foods Corp;, announced. Born early this century as the nickel
chocolate bar, it will be replaced by a 25-cent cousin. The quarter
Hershey weighs .15 ounce more than its departed predecessor.
Wholesalers will meet the new Hershey November 27, but the.25-cent
bar won't hit the shelves until early next year, a company
spokesperson said. Eulogized the spokesperson, "The 20-cent bar's life
was short, but sweet."

Out of order
Who needs Hershey bars? A "vending machine" in Denver
dispenses marijuana - or at least it did, until the local folks in blue
caught on. The machine, actually a booth, had a slit in its door where
buyers would slide their money and receive their purchase and
change. The seller sat on a stool behind the booth and was never seen
by the buyer. Police raided the house where the booth was located
Tuesday after receiving complaints from neighbors. The house was
located about a block from a Denver high school. No doubt the
machine's contents proved more popular than the usual cafeteria fare.
.Election woes
James Stafford won by a landslide in his bid to become Seal
Beach, Calif.'s city treasurer, but he won't be taking office. Voters
also eliminated the job. Stafford outpolled William Ruzgis, 7,489 to
2,739 Tuesday. But Proposition P, to combine the treasurer's job with
that of the appointed finance director passed, too. So Stafford was
voted out of office just as quickly as he was voted in.
More election woes
When the Golden Valley, Minn., Health Center was turned into a
polling place for Election Day, workers decided to take advantage of

By PAULA LASHINSKY
The brilliance of the fall colors makes
it easy to forget the cold weather days
ahead. But if you've already tired of
tumbles in the leaves, one new way to
savor these last, crisp autumn days is
to take a nature walk in Park Lyndon.
These free walks highlight different
aspects of the 205-acre park, according
to park operations superintendent
Stacy Fox. Among these are the several
habitats within Park Lyndon, such as
the lake, bog, and grasslands.
THE NOVEMBER autumnal treks
focus on winter wildlife and the natural
seasonal changes that occur in the
area.

According to. Fox, migrating birds
and special species such as Sandhill
Cranes and Great Blue Herons will be
observed and discussed in the first
program this Sunday. Activities that
day will also include a demonstration of
the live trapping of small animals.
A subsequent walk will feature win-
ter's floral splendor. Participants can
learn to identify trees through bark,
limb structure, and winter twigs and
insects. The final hike will explore how
nature prepares for winter.
Led by Washtenaw County Parks and
Recreation Commission naturalists,
each Sunday's walk will begin at Park
Lyndon, one mile east of M-52 at 10 a.m.
The walks continue through Sunday,
November 26.

r f

. Daily Official Bulletin
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1978
Daily Calendar:
Guild House: Soup and sandwich 500
luncheon, Fr. Matin Garate, Chilean
Exile, Quaker Center, United Nations,
"Political Oppression in Chile," 802
Monroe, noon.
GENERAL NOTICE
Recreational Sports Advisory
Committee meeting Monday
November 13, 1978, Bell Pool
Conference Room, 4 p.m.
CAR.EER PLANNING & PI'ACEMENT
:1200 SAB
A program presenting alternatives for foreign
language majors will he held on November 16, 198 -
Thursday. 4:00-5:15 at the Residential College -
room 126. A panel featuring former foreign language
majors: Celeste Dykas, Retail Management: Mary
Erwin, Publishing; Janis Syrovy. Mechanic.
The First National Bank of Chicago invites you to
attend a Chicago reception on December 27th and
28th to discuss career opportunities in management
in our First Scholar Program. If you would like to
find out more about the First Scholar Program,
please forward your resume by December 8th to:
Lorraine P. M~nthei. Assistant First Scholar
Coordinator, The First National Bank of Chicago,
One First National Plaza, Chicago, 111. 60670.
Companies resruiting at Career Planning and
Placement are:
November 14: New York University Gradualer
School of Business Administration, Upjon Company.
Institute for Paralegal Training, Oakridge National
Laboratories, Standard Oil of California Chevron,
Old Kent Bandand Trust, Metropolitan Life
Insurance Company.
November 15: NCR Corporation, Wharton
Graduate School of Business.
November 16: U.S. Navy, Korvettes, Pitney-Bowes
Inc.
November 17: Drew University, Wendy's
International. Detroit Coca-cola Bottling company.
November 20: K-Mart Corporation, Honeywell,
Comshare. Inc
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIX, No.X56
Friday, November 10, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semestersi; Si by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published through Saturday
morning. Subscription rates: $650 in Ann Arbor:
$7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
.1 -

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WhERE ARE
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x
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DOWN ON T VERY'T 4J W6.

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Reserve NOW
for Christmas, .
Intersession &Easter
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Center for Student Travel, Inc.
1140 Broadway, N.Y.C.
TOLL-FREE
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FRYE, DEXTE R

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U R
4\COAT ,'
s 5 ow iNq. *

You are invited to an informal showing of
men's fur coats on Tuesday, November 14
from 9:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m.
in the Men's Shop, to see the most
luxurious, practical and natural way
we know for a man to conquer winter weather
in style. Included in the collection of
long hair and short hair furs are
raccoon, muskrat, nutria, fox and opossum
classic and fashion silhouettes.

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