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November 09, 1978 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

J.

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, November 9, 1978-Page9

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scoreboard
This week's results

Arise, ye snow lovers!

'M'ski clui

By ALAN FANGER
The recent spell of Indian Summer
weather didn't sit too well with the
folks in the Michigan ski racing club.
November, after all, is a time for
breaking the boots and bindings out
of the clqset and waxing those skis
for the upcoming season.
But alas, old Sol is finally taking
his five-month sabbaticaf, and no
news could be more pleasing to the
several eager students who take to
the slopes every weekend for
competition in slalom and giant
slalom events.
THESE WEEKEND
excursions to Crystal 'Mountain
resort have become a 'ritual for the
club. There they compete with
Michigan State, Eastern Michigan,
Western Michigan, Notre Dame, and
other regional schools for berths in
the National Collegiate Ski
Association (NCSA) championships.
. Fortunately, most of the club's
travel costs are offset by a healthy
grant from the Recreational Sports
department. The club does generate
one-third of its own revenue, most of
it coming from a "ski swap" in
December.
The club's budget permits
fourteen people to race during the
season, and tryouts in December are
designed to fill those spots. "Our
first race of the year determines the
starting lineup," said co-captain
Chris Wolf. "This year will be
interesting since we lost a lot of
people to graduation."

gears up
WHILE THE RACERS boast of
consistently good performances
against their regional rivals, two
elements are noticeably absent: a
coach, and intercollegiate status:
The club doesn't feel the need for a
coach; thus, leadership comes from
the men's and women's co-captains.
"We're very self-sufficient," said
Wolf. "It works out very well with
co-captains, and a treasurer to
organize our finances."
The absence of intercollegiate
status is bothersome to the club,
however. "We keep asking for
varsity status," said Wolf, "But the
University has a moratorium on
changing club sports to varsity
sports." Wolf added that the
moratorium may continue for
another two or three years, putting
varsity status far down the road.
The weekend "meets" operate
similar to the Olympic format. Each
team enters five men and five
women, all of whom race against the
clock. The series culminates in an
annual dual slalom at Crystal
Mountain, where contestants race
against each other in an elimination
format.
Last February, the women
captured first place and the men
second in the regional meet. "Then
we asked the University to give us
varsity status for just the day of
nationals, but they wouldn't do
that," explained Wolf.

Football
Independent Competitive
Badgers 12, Black & Blue 0 ,
Full Mooners 30, Midshipmen "B" 0
Los Chingones 38, Peace Makers 0
Good Times 12, Random Samples 2
Tocky's Terror 8, Great Stuff 0
Pack 11 6, U Towers 0
Fupped Ducks 22.Pleasant Pheasants 0
Midshipmen "A" 28, Reemers 0
Irradicators 50, Apes of Wrath 0
Canyon 26. Positions 8
Busch Men 8. Atomic Stallions 0
Spins 8, Mountain Oysters 0
Sun Devils 8, Frustrated Jocks 0
C.w. & Company 8, Sudden Death 2
Speed Merchants 6, Abraxes 0
Red Devils 20, Mack Attack 0
Power House 14, El Sereno Bandito 0
Show Biz Kids (W) Them (LI (f)
Architecture 28. Droogs 0
Phantom 6, Chain Saw Monks 0
Dallas coke-Boys (W), Buddy Kids (L.) (def.)
Helliphino 16, Joint Effort 0
Keelsmi(W).Forum (L),(f)
Totally Offensive 14, Abeng 0
Outlaws 22, Les Entrejambes 14.
Red Shirts 12, Phelta Thi 0
Bones 6, AIAA 0
0-0 Silks 4, Couzens Gold 1 (fd.)
Mad D~ogs 14, Cadavers 6
Steelers 14, lDelta Eagles 0
Buds 14, Atomic Roosters 0
Beaver Patrol 32, Anarchists 0
Psychology (W). Credibility (L), (f)
Little Wolves 16. Ambatana 8
Independent Recreative
Beasts (W), Lions (L), (f)
DAILY LI BEL,0Kelly's Heroes 6
MMB 14, Gangue 0
Stud Service 12, Archers 0
Interflex 8, Portney's Complaint 6
Meat Men (W), Merry Courters (L). (def.)

Residence Hall "A"
Oxford 16. MoJo Jaugernauts 0
St. Peter's Brigade 20, William[louse 6
Bartlett (W), Butler (LI (f)
Douglas Nads 12, Little House 6
Blagdon 8, Douglas 7' 0
Kelsey 6, Frederick 0
Kelsey 12, Douglas '7' 0
Iluberites 20, 3rd Hamilton 0
Gomberg 12, Van Tyne Vandals 0
Allen Rumsey 8, Alice's 0
Michigan 8, Scott House 6
Elliott 24, Frost 6
5th Hamilton 16, MoJo Maulers 0)
Reeves 20, Beast Quad 0
Fisher Vikings 8, Chicago 0
Rotvig 14, Douglas 2
3rd Lewis (W), Wenley (L)
Taylor 6, MoJo Gold 0
Adams 16, Fletcher 0
Residence Hall "B"
Michigan 7, Butler 0
Fletcher 2. Williams 0
Elliott 18, Reeves 0
Oxford 3, Gomberg I
Wenley 8, Huberites 0
Alice's 8, Adams 0
Allen Rumsey 36, Chicago 0
Residence Hall Recreative
Hamilton (W), Alice's (L)
Fraternity "A"
Phi Delta Theta 20, Chi Psi 0
Chi Phi 6, Sigma Phi 0
Delta Upsilon 13, Trigon 0
Lambda Chi Alpha 14, Theta Chi 6
Sigma Phi Epsilon 30, Kappa Sigma 0
Psi Upsilon 8.Sigma Chi 0
Phi sigma Kappa (W). Tau Kappa Epsilon (LI,
(def.)
Alpha Phi Alpha 8, Beta Theta Pi 0
Delta Tau Delta (WI, Sigma Alpha Mu (LI, (f)
Evans Scholars 6, Kappa Alpha Psi 0
Omega Psi Phi 6, Delta Chi 0
Phi Gamma Delta 18, Triangle 0
Theta Delta Chi 12. Alpha Tau Omega 8
Zeta Psi 6,Sigma Nn4 1

Fraternity "B"
Phi Delta Theta 22, Theta Chi 0
Chi Psi 6, Delta Tau Delta 0
Lambda Chi Alpha 8, Alpha Phi Alpha 2
Psi Upsilon 8.,('hi Phi 0
Evans Scholars 14, Theta Delta Chi 0
Beta Theta Pi 8, Kappa Sigma 6
Delta Upsilon 6, Sigma Nu 0
Sigma Phi Epsilon 12, Zeta Psi 6i
Phi Gamma Delta 6, Sigma Phi 0
Phi Sigma Kappa 6. Alpha Delta Phi 3
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 14, Alpha Delta Phi 2
Phi Sigma Kappa (W), Sigma Phi (L)
Co-Rec Competitive
Waldo's (W), University Lutheran ( L) (f)
Condors 14, U D6 plus 412
Hunt/Taylor 14, Frost House 6
MBA $ (W), U f)6 plus 4 (L), (f)
Condors 20, Frost House 8
hunt/Taylor 12,MBA $6
Law Maroon 6, Little Pups 0
hole in the Wall Gang (W), Imperial Storm
Troopers (L, (def.)
Los Burros 14, First Couzens 0
Co-Rec Recreative
Curse of Baba Yoga 8, 9, Sharps & a Flat 0
Law Dirt 5. Williams 2 (fd.)
F-Squared 14, Buff's Bouncers 0)
Campus Broadcasting (W), Van Tyne (L). (f)
Betas/Pi Phis 3, Molson Mutilators ) (fd)
Women's Competitive
Bombers 6, Alpha Gamma Delta 0
East Quad Women's (W). Bruisers (L(, (def.)
humor 18. Stockwell Girls 6
Bunt House3,. Delta Gamma ) (fs.)
Barborians (W), Delta Delta Delta (L.), (f)
Women's Recreative
MCB'S 8. Bush [louse 0
Soccer
All-Campus Playoffs
Navy '2, Gomberg 0
Rowdies 3 bLaw Passers 0
MBA'S 2, Kelsey Kameljacks 0

j

MJGO 2, Coast Guard I
Taylor 1. Bemo0
Racquetball
Independent Division
Fupped Ducks 3, Cambridge Men's 0
Irradicators 3, Powerhouse 0
Beaver Patrol 3, Bones 0
Couzens Blue 3, Midshipmen "B" 0
Forum 3, Aiche 0
Couzens Gold 3, Midshipmen "A" i
Canyon 3., AIAA 0
Residence Hall
Allen Rumsey (W). Taylor (L)
Reeves (W).Wenley (L)'
MoJo Blue 3, Allen Rumsey 0
Fletcher (W), Van Tyne (L), (f)
Frederick 2, Oxford I
Kelsey (W), Butler (L) (f)
2nd Hamilton (W). Gold (L)
Chicago (W), MoJo Maulers (L)
Gomberg (W), Huber (L)
Elliott House (W), Adams "A" (L)
Fraternity
Beta Theta Pi 3, Theta Delta Chi 0
Sigma Alpha Mu 3. Sigma Phi 0
Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, Phi Sigma Kappa I
Sigma Nu (W)I, Lambda Chi (L)
Alpha Delta Phi 3, Psi Upsilon 0
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 3, Tau Kappa Epsilon 0
Chi Phi 2. Phi Gamma Delta I
Triangle (W) Zeta Psi (). (f)
Evans Scholars (W). Kappa Sigma (I)

I I

We advise .. .
The scores and schedules presented
on this page are as accurate as
possible. However, we suggest that you
check with the IM department to
double-check deadlines or if you think
your team's score was reported inac-
curately.
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INTRAMURAL HIGHLIGHTSDROUGHT TOYOUDY

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Half the calories

70 calories

-

50% less than our regular beer

PROGRAM DIRECTOR SEEKS TO COMBAT PROBLEM

1

Injuries persist in many IM activities

By SCOTT M. LEWIS
Injuries. They are inescapable at
any level of competition. Bruises,
sprained ankles, rearranged noses
and jammed fingers will dutifully
crop up during athletic contests
whether it be the NFC Champion-
ship or a pickup game at the
schoolyard.
Michigan's Intramural
Department is hardly immune from
injury. As of November 1 twenty-
eight IM participants were befelled
by injuries ranging from everyday
scrapes and strains to concussions
and fractures. Last year at this time
25 IM-related injuries were
reported.
Dick Pitcher, Director of
Intramurals, expressed concern
over the injury total but conceded
that the IM department can only try
to alleviate the problem, not
eliminate it.
"The nature of the sports dictates
that injuries will occur," said
Pitcher, who joined the IM staff in
1970. "When there's physical
contact, some injuries are just
unavoidable."
"Officials' control of the game
also has much to do with the number
of injuries, although this is not as
much of a factor as the sport itself.
Our officials' training program

However, in cases of serious
injury when an ambulance is
needed, emergency telephones are
located at Fuller, Elbel and Ferry
Fields. A field supervisor can advise
an injury victim to seek' hospital
attention, but he cannot force a
person to ride in an ambulance.
As expected, most IM injuries
occur in football, though hockey,
basketball, softball and even tennis
have caused some accidents.
Twisted knees, cuts and bruises are

the most common afflictions, but a
severely dislocated knee has
already been reported this year.
The game is supposed to be touch,
but action can become quite
physical at the line of scrimmage.
"When we review the situation at
the end of the season we will look at
the seriousness of injuries, not just
the amount," said Pitcher. "If the
department believes that injuries
can be reduced by making rule

changes, we will make these
changes."
Other schools, including
Michigan State, have adopted a 'no-
blocking' system. In this virtually
contact-free game, the quarterback
is unmolested and a team can throw
an unlimited number of forward
passes per down. The end result is a
cross between rugby and speedball,
not the kind of game which Pitcher
sees for Michigan,
"I'd hate to go to this system As it
stands now, we'll change only if the
number of serious injuries increases
significantly. We'll have to wait until
the season ends before doing
anything."
Pitcher dispelled the belief that
injures most frequently occur
during poor playing conditions. A
muddy or soggy field hinders
players from accelerating, 'a factor
which Pitcher says reduces chances
for injury.
Women's and Co-Recreational
football are less injury-filled than
the men's version, but such wasn't
always the case. The department,
noting the prevalence of injury
among women in IM football,
experimented with a screen-
blocking system this season.
Under this set-up, defensive
players must run around-not

0 'flNO
time 1
1 r

Coming soon

. 0 0

Thursday, November 9--
-Clinic for athletic training, conditioning and injuries for joggers con-
tinued: CCRB, Room 2230, 6:30 p.m.-9-30 p.m.
Friday, November 10-
-"New Games" Workshop: CCRB, 7 p.m.-10 p.m. Workshop will also
be held Saturday, Nov. 11 at the Sports Colliseum, 1 p.m.-6 p.m., apd
Sunday, Nov. 12 at the NCRB, 2 p.m.-6 p.m.
Monday, November 13--
-Meeting for the Advisory Committee for Recreational Sports (ACRS):
4:15 p.m.-6:15 p.m., Margaret Bell Pool conference room, CCRB.
The meeting is open to the general public..

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