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November 09, 1978 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-09

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday. November 9, 1978-Page 7
Tax Reform Act surs building renovations

By JOE VARGO
New interest in renovating old
buildings has been stimulated nation-
wide by economic as well as aesthetic
benefits due to the Tax Reform Act and
due to energy costs, the president of the
Michigan Society of Architects told an
architects' conference on campus
yesterday.
Art Nelson, president of the society,
championed such rehabilitation to
aout 60 architects at the Chrysler Cen-
tet on North Campus. The conference is
,64e of 12 being held around the country
t®familiarize architects with laws and
standards to follow when they revamp

old buildings, according to Mike Washo,
deputy director of the Michigan History
Division of the Michigan State Depar-
tment.
THE TAX REFORM Act of 1976 has
been instrumental in the rehabilitation
of old buildings, Washo said.
"The Tax Reform Act provided
federal tax incentives for restoration
work done on income-producing
historical places," he said. He added
that restoration has been on the up-
surge since the law was enacted.
Proponents of the Tax Reform Act
extolled it as a boom to business even
before it was enacted. Old buildings are

generally considered a sound business
investment.
NELSON SAID rehabilitating an old
building costs 25 per cent less and
requires 25 per cent less energy than
building a new one. He added that 75
per cent of revamping costs go toward
labor. Labor expenses comprise only 50
per cent of new building outlays, he
said.
"This puts. more people to work.
Today, that is a big plus in favor of
rehabilitation," Nelson said.
The energy crisis aroused interest in
preserving old buildings, because of
rising costs, according to Nelson.

"Energy was cheap and the low price of
energy made it more economical to
construct a new building than to
preserve an older one,"he said.
NELSON SAID, "Many sound older
buildings were torn doen during urban
renewals" when people thought new
meant better. "But the energy crunch
froced people to think of new uses for
old buildings. He said he believes the
Tax Reform Act has provided a "prac-
tical framework of preservation of
older structures," and that it will con-
tinue to be a key factor.

The Ann Arbor Alliance presents
HARVEY WASSERMAN
Noted Journalist and member of New England's
Anti-Nuclear Clamshell Alliance
speaking on:
NUCLEAR ENERGY, THE JOB EATER
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9
7:30 p.m., Michigan Union Ballroom
No Admission Charge
(Lecture will be preceeded by screening of "The Last Resort, "a documentary
about the Seabrook demonstrations.)

Studying
got you
down

Take a
break

Election Results

With at least % of the vote tabulated,
these unofficial results were recorded by UPI.
U.S. Senate
D-Levin- 53% ........................... 1,348,853
R-Griffin-47% .................. ..1,216,732
Governor
R-Milliken-56% ......................... 1,446,590
D-Fitzgerald-44% ....................1,136,109
U.S. House, Second District
R-Pursell-66%............................78,056
D-Greene-34% ............................. 39,487
Michigan Senate, 18th District
D-Pierce-52% ............................11,682
R-Colburn-48% ......................... 10,681
Michigan House, 53rd District
D-Bullard-64% ...............18,940
R-Buchanan-35% ........................10,498
Michigan Supreme Court
Williams-36%'....................1,102,171
Ryan-31% .......... ..................879,245
Secretary of State.
D-Austin-67%...y.....................1,258,773
R-Larsen-33% ............................ 620,893
Attorney General
D-Kelley-70% ........................... 1,264,417
R-Bransdorfer-30% ....................549,221
YES NO
Proposal A
Constitutional Convention

Proposal B
Prohibit Parole

1,454,551
1,251,551
1,421,238
1,281,037
1,066,605
645,263
913,331
1,561,787
1,050,219
896,147

Proposal C
Deposit state funds
Proposal D
Drinking Age
Proposal E
Headlee Tax Plan
Proposal G
State troopers bargaining
Proposal H
Voucher plan
Proposal J
Tisch tax plan
Proposal K
Deny bail
Proposal M
Gas tax allocation
Proposal R
Railroad redevelopment

511,691
641,363
1,082,454
1,192,437
808,953
1,850,101
1,572,961
334,520
832,806
955,666

.
w

Law School Student Senate Speakers Committee
AND
Committee for Human Rights in Latin America
PRESENTS
IMMIGRATION LAW
PROBLEMS & POLITICS

SPEAKERS
ALTHA HERNANDEZ.....................Immigration Law
Legal Aid Attorney from Del Rio, Texas
PETER SCHAYConstitutional Rights of Undocumented Workers
Aliens' Rights Progam
JOSE JACQUES MEDINA................... Political Asylum
Mexico City Attorney

..',

i

3:30 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 9 - Room 120 Hutchins Hal
MANN THEATRES Wed. Matinees
FO LLAGETWIN Al seats $1 .50
MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER
176901300 until 4:30

468,668

1,429,555

Democrats maintain edge

Just for the
health of it.

(Continued from Page 1)
responsible for President John Ken-
hedy's 1960 media effort. The most con-
troversial of Fitzgerald's adver-
tisements was the one that linked the
fire retardant PBB with birth defects
and causing the brain to grow outside
the head.
In all, seven incumbent Senators -
including Griffin - felt the voters'
animosity and were defeated at the
polls. Five of the defeated incumbents
were Democrats and two were
Republicans.
And, of course, there were the
presidential aspirants who could use
victories this year to fuel their 1980
campaigns for the White House. Gover-
nor Jerry Brown won easily in Califor-
nia and Illinois Governor James Thom-
pson triumphed over his Democratic
opponent. Senator Howard Baker of
Tennessee, the minority leader, won
handily, and in Michigan, Milliken's
surprise big win started speculation
about his national ambitions.
THIS YEAR was also a popularity
>.'contest for Jimmy Carter, his vice-
president, and for Massachusetts
Senator Ted Kennedy, all of whom
_ criss-crossed the country for
Democratic candidates, and all of
whom may have presidential ambitions
for 1980 and beyond.
On the state level, too, the electorate
again showed their discontent; four in-
cumbent governors were tossed out. As
a' further testament to the bi-
partisanship of voter frustration, two of
the ousted incumbent governors were
Republican and two were Democrats.
This anti-government mood could
have translated into a GOP sweep at
the polls. But the Democrats got the
message early, and every candidate
running for anything this year had
some kind of tax relief plan. Democrats
looked a bit more conservative than
usual this, election year, and even the
most liberal candidates - like Carl
Ievin - were advocating liberal
programs with more than a hint of
fiscal restraint.
THE REPUBLICANS meanwhile
could only watch helplessly while an
issue tailor-made to their less-
'government philosophy became the
rallying cry of both parties. Ironically
a nationwide Gallop poll late in the
campaign showed that most people
thought the Democrats were the party
eSt able to cut taxes and limit spen-
ding.
INCUMBENT Democratic governors
won in both New York and Connecticut,
a
DISCO
*

. ...

but by narrow margins of victory.
Republican governors were returned
in Ohio and Alaska, but the margin was
just close enough to let them know that
if they don't cut taxes by the next elec-
tion year, they're out.
In Minnesota, voters showed that
Wendell Anderson couldn't get away
with appointing himself to a vacant
Senate seat, and Massachusetts voters
told Senator Ed Brooke that he couldn't
get away with mis-stating his finances.
Both incumbents lost in Tuesday's
balloting.
Coupled with the general anti-gover-
nment mood across the nation was a
feeling that if the politicians won't give
the voters what they want, they'll write
their own laws.
Voters.in 38 states by-passed their
governments Tuesday and decided
some 200 referenda, ballot proposals
and constitutional amendments. They
ranged from a gay rights ordinance in
Florida to an extension of capital

punishment in California.
THE SENATE and Governor's races
here also were indicators of the nation-
wide trend for voters to pay less atten-
tion to party labels than in the past.
Milliken, who won reelection by a sur-
prising 56 per cent, did well in the
Democratic Detroit area and even
manged to pick up a quarter of the
black vote.
Meanwhile, Carl Levin cut into two of
Griffin's major Republican
strongholds-suburban Detroit and the
Upper Peninsula. Detroit area voters
went for Levin primarily because of his
name recognition as Detroit's former
City Council president. And in the U.P.,
Republicans were disenchanted with
Griffin for changing his mind about
seeking a third term.
Upper Peninsula voters, traditionally
Republican, went for the Detroit
Democrat this election year.

SHOW
TIMES
Sat-Sun-Wed
1:30
4:~00
6:30
9:05
Mon-Tues
Thurs-Fri
6:30
9:05

1:,17 is
i .dtt t h'r'S'ry:ai~C'ru->

: .eeI

" ' PP oAao
Physical Education Public Information
Amnerican Alhian( Pfor Health
Physical Educatnon and RecratIon
1201 16th St N W Washinglon C 20036
PIANO MUSIC M
from
Broadway Shows
LtKNG
115 E. Liberty-663-3381
Open Monday and Friday Evenings

PARAMOUNT

PICTURES

PRESENTS

F(p in

SHOW
TIMES
Sot-Sun-Wed
1:00 6:15
2:45 8:00
4:30 9:45

2 1

Mon-Tues-
Thurs-Fri
8:00
9:45

I

r

SEMINAR
STEPHEN T. MASON
of the University of British Columbia
Speaks on
"lesions of the Dorsal Noradrenergic
Fri., Nov. 10 1:30 p.m. Rm. 1057, MHRI Bldg.
This seminar co-sponsored by Cycle Biology
NOTE CHANGE IN TIME AND DATE
W10B Announces
IN CONCERT at the
SECOND CHA NCE
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14-9 PM

BIG GEORGE'S PRESENTS A
cmiy
(get involved)
DEMONSTRATION
& SEMINA R
W AO~sswith $lide Presentation

1

Now"

ENROLL TODAYI
TWO SEMINARS-
MONDAY, NOV. 13
TUESDAY, NOV..14
from 8:00 to 10:30 pm
at WEBER'S INN
only $10 in advance!

L

MEDIUM FORMAT -

FLINT
"Don't miss the Ann Arbor Premiere of America's
fastest rising supergroup"
Tickets $6.50 On sale now-Second Chance
A SON OF BAMBOO PRODUCTION

o9

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George's staff and a Mamiya representative will present an
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medium format photography-PLUS, we'll supply the model, the
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can really get a chance to try Medium Format first hand! Enroll
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