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November 09, 1978 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-09

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, November 9, 1978-Page 5

MSA repeats pres.
selection demands*

MSA VP resigns
(Continued from Page 1)

BEER CANS
WASHINGTON (AP)-Since the first
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BY WILLIAM THOMPSON
The Michigan Student Assembly
(MSA) Tuesday night reiterated its
stance demanding greater student in-
put in the selection process for the new
Uiversity president.
NVISA endorsed a list of six demands
which will be presented to Regent
Robert Nederlander when he meets
with the MSA committee on presiden-
tial selection early next week.
"THE MEETING with Nederlander
is going to be very decisive,"
speculated MSA member Kate Rubin.
"Unless he reacts to these proposals in
a very positive way, the MSA boycott
(against participating in the current
selection process) will be continued."
The demands, which were drawn up
by the MSA presidential selection
committee, were designed to insure
equality among the advisory commit-
tees of alumni, faculty, and students.
The equality standards would apply to
committee budgets and access to can-
didates.
The proposals call for meetings of the

Regents and presidential candidates
with the advisory committees.
THE MSA committee also demanded
advance notice to advisory committees
interviews with presidential candidates
and demanded to be notified
beforehand of the final guidelines for
the Regents to follow when they select
the president.
After the meeting with Nederlander,
the MSA committee will report back to
the entire Assembly. The committee
will not make any decisions, but will
merely present MSA's demands.
IN other action, MSA agreed to spon-
sor an experimental increase in North
Campus bus service. The buses, which
currently run until 12:30 a.m. on week-
days, one a.m. on Fridays and 1:20 on
Saturdays, would run three hours later
under the new plan.
If the extended service, which will
operate for a month under MSA fun-
ding, attracts a sufficient increase in
ridership, the University Ad-
ministration has agreed to sponsor the
service permanently.

port the projects she thought were im-
portant, said Smith. *
EXPRESSING discontent with
MSA's handling of student involvement
Sin the presidential search process
Smith accused MSA of concentrating
on self gratification instead of practica
details.
"It's the Regents' job to choose th
next president, and if they ask for MSA
input they (MSA) should give it if they
want, or forget it," said Smith. "Trying
to take away the power of the Regents
to make this choice is going on an ego
trip."
Smith added MSA was inefficient ir
dealing with the Regents because it
used too many ambiguous terms.
Smith said publicity of the trial
period for running student buses to Nor-
th Campus at late hours was crucial
But MSA members didn't support this.
"I thought the course evaluation
project was important also, and studen
ts are paying for it, but I couldn't gel
enough people behind it," said Smith.

1
t
r
r
1
'1

Smith

Sadat
t e
chastizes
hardline.
Arabs
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - President
Anwar Sadat blasted oil-rich Arab
states and other opponents yesterday,
accusing them of pettiness and
"defeatist complexes" for failing to en-
dorse his peacemaking efforts with
Israel.
In an interview with the editor of the
Kuwait newspaper Al Syassi, excerpts
of which were carried by the official
Middle East News Agency, Sadat called
on the Arabs to "stop burying their
heads in the sand like ostriches and
being the laughing stock of the world."
He said they should accept the reality of
Israel's presence and learn to live with
it.
IN WASHINGTON, Israeli
negotiators told Secretary of State.
Cyrus Vance their government wants to
drop a passage in the proposed peace
treaty's preamble upon which Sadat in-
sists.
Without retreating from its offer of
civil autonomy on the occupied West
Bank and in the Gaza district, the
Israeli negotiators told Vance Israeli
cabinethardliners want to delete the
passage linking peace between the two
countries to follow-up talks on a com-
d prehensive Mideast settlement.
t That would strip the preamble of any
direct reference to overall U.S.-guided
peace efforts, including negotiations
over the West Bank, Gaza and their 1.1-
million Palestinian residents.
While the Israeli and Egyptian com-
mitment to negotiate an overall set-
tlement would be reflected in other por-
tions of the treaty "package," including
accompanying documents, the con-
troversy over preamble language com-
plicates completion of the negotiations.
Israel's position was outlined to Van-
ce at a 40-minute meeting by Defense
Minister Ezer Weizman, who returned
from consultations in Jerusalem, and
by Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan.

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Daily Photo by MAUREEN O'MALLEY
SPEAKING AT THE TEACH-IN on Mexico last night were Hector Marroquin (left), a radical student leader who flei
Mexico in 1974, and Juan Jose Pena, a Chicano leader from New Mexico. Not pictured is Julia Preston, a freelance journalis
Who spoke on the womens' movement in Mexico.
Repression attacked at teach-in

(Continued from Page 1)
against independent political parties,
and hinted that it may also be involved
in frame-ups of Mexican opposition
leaders.
MARROQUIN DENIED the Mexican
government's accusations that he is a
terrorist. "I have always been opposed
to: individual violence," he said. "To
change we have to organize the
majority of the people."
Marroquin pointed out that in 1974 the
Mexican government accused him of
taking part in a terrorist raid, an in-
cident which occurred when he was ac-
tually hospitalized in Texas following a
car accident.
Also speaking last night was Juan
Jose Pena, one of the founders of the
Raza Unida Party. Raza Unida is a
Chicano political party based in New
Mexico.
PENA GAVE A detailed history of
the U.S. land grabs of Mexican,
territory in the Southwest during the
19th century, as well as the suppression
of Chicano political power which has
continued since then.
In spite of political repression, Pena
claimed, Chicanos will eventually
become powerful enough to control

politics in much of the Southwest. Then,
he warned, "don't be surprised if you
see a movement to reunite with
Mexico."
Closing out the second session of the
teach-in was Julia Preston, a freelance
journalist who has lived for several
years in Mexico, and has been par-
ticularly concerned with the womens'
movement in that country.
PRESTON NOTED Mexico has the
most active and powerful womens'
movement in South America, although
in comparison to the United States it is
"still quite a small movement."

Considerable progress has been
made in the last year, she said, partly
because winning several controversial
court cases involving rape has helped
establish the rights of women, and ser-
ved to boost morale among feminists.
The teach-in, which is being spon-
sored by the Ann Arbor Committee for
Human Rights in Latin America, will
have its third and final session
tomorrow night at 7:30 in Schorling
Auditorium in the School of Education
building. The central topic will be the
plight of Mexican workers in the United
States.

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_ . I

UM Clericals
Union Democracy Makes the Difference
VOTE "YES"-for OCC November 13-17
Many clericals have had or heard about bad experiences with unions. The picture is usually the
same: a small group of high-paid union officials, isolated from the membership, run the union in
their own interests. Even so, almost without exception, unionized workers have better wages,
benefits and working conditions than non-unionized workers in comparable jobs.
"Better than nothing" is- not good enough, however. How can our new union represent our in-
"Bettterth nthnte average, bureaucratized union? Under the OCC's proposed bylaws, union
democracy is the difference.
According to the proposed bylaws
- the membership is the highest authority of the nion
* the membership decides the key issues at regulr monthly meetings
and special meetings as needed
all uniorrepresentatives are elected annually and subject to
recall atany time.

-11

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