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September 08, 1978 - Image 75

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Greene challenges canvassers

The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 8, 1978-Page 5A

By MICHAEL ARKUSH
CityCouncilman Earl Greene (D-
Second Ward), vying for the 2nd
District U.S. Congressional seat, has
filed suit against the State Board of
Canvassers for refusing to place his
name on the November ballot.
SThe Michigan Court of Appeals is ex-
°ected'to review the case next week.
- THE FOUR-MEMBER state agency
voted last week to deny Greene a spot
because he failed to receive 15 per cent
of the greatest number of votes cast by
his party for any office in the statewide
August 8 primary.
The board's' decision overruled At-
torney General Frank Kelley's opinion.
which stated the candidate receiving
the most write-in ballots in an uncon-
tested primary automatically qualifies
for the November slate.
Greene received an overwhelming

majority of write-in votes but fell short
of the 15 per cent requirement.
"WE HAVE NOTHING against Mr.
Greene. It is just that we realize the in-
tent of the law is not for a write-in can-
didate to be on the ballot unless he
fulfills the law," said Nancy Chase,
chairperson of the State Board of Can-
vassers.
Kelley's opinion became necessary
when conflicting sections of the state's
Elections Code caused confusion over
what requirements candidates who
were not on the primary ballot must
meet to become eligible for the Novem-
ber slate.
One section of the code states a per-
son needs to meet the 15 per cent
requirement. A contradictory portion,
however, indicates the candidate must
only receive a majority of write-in
ballots.

Medical experts find no
conspiracy in JFK death

STANLEY STEINBORN, Kelley's
chief assistant, explained the depar-
tment selected the latter portion
because "We felt we could be as lenient
as possible to ease the access to the
ballot."
Greene, the only official candidate to
oppose Republican Rep. Carl Pursell,
was declared ineligible for the primary
ballot when the canvassers ruled his
petitions contained illegible signatures.
The state board argued that many
people failed to check a place of
residency next to their names.
GREENE'S CAMPAIGN staff sent
letters to local Democrats urging them
to write his name on the ballot after it
became clear the name would not ap-
pear.
Greene claims the attorney general's
opinion is valid and the 15 per cent
requirement is inapplicable in U.S.
Congresional races. He also argues that
state agencies are required to abide by
the attorney general's opinions.
Mike Hodge, one of Kelley's assistan-
ts, said, however, that this particular
opinion was only a letter opinion and
not a formal one, thereby not forcing
state agencies to follow it.
THE ATTORNEY General's Office,
as the chief law enforcement agency in
the state, must now face the ironic task
of defending the State Board okf Can-
vassers, who overturned the depar-
tment's contention.
But Hodge insists the department will
only offer legal adivice to the can-
vassers and is more concerned' with
hearing the court's verdict to avoid
future uncertainty.
"This case is an important precedent
and we are very interested in finding
out what the law will be," said Hodge.
Greene said his campaign staff has
already begun working to defeat the in-
cumbent Republican congressman,
who is running for his second term.
"I'm optimistic but I think it is still
too early to be able to tell what my
chances are," said the councilman.

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WASHINGTON (AP)-Eight medical
experts backed the Warren Com-
mission's conclusion that there was no
conspiracy behind John Kennedy's
assassination, asserting yesterday it
was possible a single bullet passed
through the president and struck John
Connally.
A ninth pathologist agreed with the
others that Kennedy was shot from
behind, but said he could not rule out
the possibility that a second gunman
other than Lee Harvey Oswalk was in-
volved.
THE DISSENTER, Dr. Cyril Wecht,
said he could not subscribe to the so-
called "magic bullet" theory-that one
bullet could have gone through Ken-
nedy's neck and then struck Connally,
critically wounding him.
"Once you eliminate the single-bullet
theory, you're in the area of two per-
sons involved," said, Wecht. "You're in
the area of conspiracy. You're in the
area of coup d'etat. And the gover-
nment cannot allow that conclusion."
But Dr. Michael Baden, spokesman
for the medical panel told the commit-
tee that all nine experts agreed that
Kennedy was shot with two bullets from
behind-the second of which shattered
his skull.
BADEN SAID all the experts except
Wecht also agreed with the Warren
Commission's conclusion that the first
bullet, which passed through Kennedy's
neck, could have traveled on to enter

Connally's shoulder and wrist, settling
in his thigh.
Baden displayed Kennedy's black
coat and bloody shirt; Connally's black
suit and shirt, and photographs,
drawings and X-rays to show the path
both bullets took on Nov. 22, 1963, the
day of the assassination.
He said all nine experts agreed that
the second bullet, which exploded Ken-
nedy's skull, was fired from behind and
above-where the commission con-
cluded that Oswald fired all shots from
the Texas School Book Depository.
BADEN, NEW YORK City's chief
medical examiner, said the experts
also agreed that the first bullet, which
passed through the president's neck,
came from behind, but could not tell
whether it came from above or below.
See PATHOLOGISTS, Page 12A

lowest po~
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John Huston's

1941

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THE MALTESE FALCON
HUMPHREY BOGART is detective Sam Spade, as hard-boiled
as good eggs come and nobody's fall guy. Though MARY
ASTOR, SYDNEY GREENSTREET & PETER LORRE try to make
him one. It all revolves around a blackbird that no one has
actually seen-but they certainly believe in it.
SAT: YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU

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Isn't it time for a

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IF you saw the '78 tour or if you didn't or whatever, tonight the best years of the
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