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November 08, 1978 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-08

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I

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, November 8, 1978-Page 3
NEW GO VERNMENT FIGHTS OPPOSITION:
Iranian military arrests mount

p. *

IF YOU SEE 6L A EN CALL D .Y
Mock assassination
Two assassination attempts and a food fight disrupted Monday
night's mock "Bier for Probate Judge" campaign rally held in South
Quad cafeteria, The culmination of a week-long mock campaign drive,
the rally began smoothly as diners chanted "We want (RA Tom)
Bier". But after a campaign speech blasting candidates Maxine
Virtue and Loren Campbell, a small food fight erupted and the
candidate was hustled off-stage. As Beir was leaving, one diner
attacked him with a butter knife but was successfully subdued by the
candidate's crew of 25 security guards. Another resident made a
similar attempt wielding a fork. He scratched Bier's hand. "I don't
know if Bier has any enemies in South Quad, but at a rally of this sort,
you get all kinds of nuts," said mock campaign manager Steven
Alderman.
Police sue city
The Police Officer's Association of Ann Arbor is suing the city
over parking. Recently the men in blue were told to park at the city's
Fourth and William carport, two blocks away from the old spot at
Fourth and Washington. This, the officers say, is too far from police
headquarters in City Hall, and violates contract provisions assuring
convenient parking. Assistant City Attorney Lamont Walton said at a
hearing, last Friday, Circuit Court Judge Ross Campbell denied a
preliminary injunction against the city, but left open the possibility of
later action if an arbitrator cannot find a sdlution.
Changing roles
The American corporation should be restructured to include
feminine and minority values, rather than remain dominated by white
males. So says Dr. Alice Sargent in an article appearing in Business
Review, a publication of the University's Graduate School of Business.
"One reason affirmative action has not become a mainstream priority
management issue, is that success threatens the privileged position
heretofore held by white males who will lose some positions and power
when qualified and qualifiable minority persons seek their share of the
corporation action," said Sargent. She also noted that women need
compensatory training to develop some business skills and suggested
that women learn how to be powerful and forthright. Sargent also said
that men must learn to accept such changes and should become aware
of feelings rather than avoiding or suppressing them.
Take ten
During a Baltimore Welfare Federation Conference held this week
ten years ago, then special assistant to University President Robben
Fleming, William Haber sharply criticized student activists,
explaining that they are very articulate concerning what they are
against, but seldom state what they are for. Compounding the
problem, said Haber, is that many "students do not want a dialogue;
they are in no mood to debate or argue. Some even demand
confrontation." But Haber also said: "Idealism is to be welcomed, and
the college age is exactly the period when questions are to be asked
and orthodoxies are to be challenged.'

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - Shah
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi's two-day-
old military government, trying to quell
violent opposition to the monarch's
authoritarian rule, announced the
arrests yesterday of 32 former
ministers and ranking civil officials.
At the same time, officials at Reza
Pahlavi Hospital said retired air force
Gen. Ali Mohammed Khademi,
dismissed as managing director of Iran
Air, died from a gunshot wound
received Sunday. The officials said they
believed the wound was self-inflicted,
but a member of the general's family
said he was attacked at his house in a
Tehran suburb by unidentified youths.
KHADEMI WAS dismissed as
managing director of, thenational
airline in a conciliatory gesture to the
country's majority Shiite Moslems. He
is a member of the minority Bahai sect.
Many of his co-religionists, meanwhile,
also were dismissed from their
positions in August when the gover-
nment of Jaafar Sharif-Emami took
over.
Unconfirmed reports said supporters
of influential Shiite holy man Ayatullah
Khomaini, in exile in Paris, had called
for a mass demonstration today near
the city's bazaar. The government, ap-

parently responding to the reports,
moved tanks and armored personnel
carriers into the area.
There is no visible sign of the
firebrand fanatic in Khomaini, the man
who may shape the future of Iran.
Khomaini smiles gently as he speaks of
his followers cutting Iranian policemen 'i
to pieces.
THE OLD MAN sitting cross-legged
on the floor of his Paris home rarely
raises his voice. But that gentle voice,
exiled from Iran since 1963, has aroused
revolt among Shiite Moslems, who con-
stitute more than 90 per cent of Iran's
population.
The embattled government of Shah
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi has accused
Khomaini of masterminding a cam-
paign to impose an anti-Western
regime on one of the West's crucial
suppliers of oil. Khomaini rejects the
accusation that he is anti-Western.
"I am neither anti-Western nor anti-
Soviet," he told an interviewer. "I am
pro-Iranian, and I am against allowing
American interests to rob Iran of its
natural wealth."
KHOMAINI MAKES no secret of his
hatred for the shah and has said in in-
terviews that he wants to depose him
and form an "Islamic republic." If the

present effort fails, he said, he will call
for all-out civil war.
Meanwhile, fuel was in short supply
in Tehran because of a three-day-old
strike by truck drivers. Army drivers
tried to fill the gap by moving supplies
to gas stations between curfew hours in
effect between nine p.m. and five a.m.
Orthodox Moslems are demanding an
end to the shah's Westernization refor-
ms which they say contradict the
teachings of the Koran, the Moslem
holy book.
THE RELIGIOUS protesters have
been joined by the political opposition,

seeking democratic reforms, freedom
for political prisoners and an end to
martial law, and by hundreds of
thousands of strikers who want more,
pay and better working conditions.
Scattered violence erupted in down-
town Tehran yesterday, but there were
no serious clashes as demonstrators
fled before troops arrived.
Small groups of anti-government
demonstrators tried to approach
Tehran University as, troops closed off
streets leading to the campus, but they
dispersed as the troops fired into the
air.

Ferry rams seawall
in foggy N.Y. harbor

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at AUD. A
FESTIVAL OF MIDDLE-EASTERN FILMS
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 8 ADMISSION FREE
(Said Marzuok, 1974) I WANT A SOLUTIO I 7 only-AUD. A
The frustrated efforts of an Egyptian upper class woman to obtain a
divorce are movingly portrayed by Faten Hamoma. In Arabic with English
subtitles.
(Shady Abdel-Salam, 1969) THE MUMMY 9 only-AUD. A
Story of the robbing of the Pharoanic tombs of ancient Egypt. In Arabic,
with English subtitles.
Tomorrow: THE CRUEL SEA & THE LAW
lil .. .,. ggj-
DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adults $1 .25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. ti l:3b P.M. SUN. & HOLS. 12 Noon til 1:30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtipie.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.

NEW YORK (AP) - A Staten Island
ferry carrying 2,000 passengers across
fog-bound New York harbor crashed in-
to a concrete seawall at the tip of lower
Manhattan yesterday, tossing the
passengers about and peeling the steel
deck back like a sardine can.
Officials said 173 persons were
treated at five hospitals and dozens
more were given first aid at the scene.
THE CONDITIONS of two people
were listed as serious - one with a
possible fractured spine and the other
with a possible heart attack.
Other injuries ranged from broken
bones to cuts and bruises suffered when
the ferry American Legion struck the
seawall at an estimated speed of three
to four knots - roughly the equivalent
of three or four mph.
"There were people flying around the
vessel, people thrown from their seats,
just about everyone was knocked

about," said Coast Guard Cmdr. Joseph
Smith, who headed an immediate Coast
Guard investigation of the accident.
THE FERRY left St. George, on
Staten Island, at 7 a.m. loaded to more
than half its capacity of 3,400. Some
passengers would normally have taken
the 6:30 a.m. run, but it was cancelled
on Election Day.
Many passengers were standing,
ready to run for subways or buses.
"Oh my God, we're going to hit,"
Eleanor Benevento said passengers
yelled.
"Back down! Back down!" cried a
deckhand, calling on Captain Irving
Satler to reverse the engines.
"The captain gave it full astern,"
said Mate Edward Hillis, but before the
propeller could reverse the 21,000-ton
ferry's momentum, the boat crashed
into the seawall near Battery Park.

Happenings
Films
Ethics and Religion - Roots: Chicken George, 4:15, Aud. 3 MLB.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - I Want a Solution, 7 p.m. The Mummy, 9
p.m.. Angell Hall, Aud. A.
Alternative Action - A Separate Peace, 7 & 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Cinema II- Padre, Padrone, 7 p.m. & 9 p.m., MLB, Aud. 3.
Cinema Guild - Bonnie and Clyde, 7 p.m. & 9:15, Old Arch. Aud.
Performances
'Studio Theatre - "The Lover", 4:10, Arena Theatre, Frieze
Building.
Anthroposophical Student Association - Eurythmeum Stuttgart,
with Romanian State Orchestra, 8 p.m., Power Center.
Meetings
Non-Academic Career. Counseling and Placement Office - panel
discussion for graduate students, "Strategies of Networking for
Academic Positions at Professional Conferences", 10 a.m. 3200 SAB. 1
Commission for Women - demonstration of the game "Which
Way ERA," noon, Old Regents Room, second floor LS&A Building.
i Speakers
Political Science Department - "The Organizational
Determinates of Judicial Attitudes", Giorgio Freddi, noon, 5208 Angell
Hall.
Center for Research Learning and Teaching - "Dr. Fox Effect,"
Les Leventhal, noon, 109 E. Madison.
Center for Afro-American and African Studies - "African States
and the Challenge of Independence", 12:00-1:30, 1017 Angell Hall.
Environmental Science and Technology - "PCB's in the Hudson
River - The Problem and its Solutions, 3:30 p.m., 185 Engineering.
Applied Mechanics and Engineering Sciences - "Buoyant
Plumes on a Transverse Wind", 4 p.m., G.G. Brown Lab.
School of Engineering - "On the Utilization of Subgradient
Optimization Instead of LP in Integer Programming," 4 p.m., 229
West Engineering.-
Ann Arbor Committee for Human Rights in Latin America-
Mexico; "Mexican Exiles Speak in Their Own Defense," Jose Jacques
Medina & Juan Jose Pena, 7:30 Schorling Aud.
Miscellaneous
English Department - Fall Poetry Workshops.
Pendleton Program - Public demonstration of Eurythmy by
performers of the Eurythmeum Stuttgart, noon, Michigan Union
Ballroom.
School of Music - Residency, conducted by the Cecil Taylor Unit,
2:30 & 7 p.m., School of Music.
Project Outreach Internship in Adolescence - accepting
applications for undergraduate field work programs, call 764-9179 or
stop by 554 Thompson for information.
Men and Women's Swim Team are looking for timers to work at
swimming meets. Those interested should call David Ellis 994-5932 or
Stuart Isaac 763-5250.
English Department Fall Workshop Series - Malcom Glass,
poetry reading, 8 p.m., Pendleton Center, Michigan Union.
Ark - Green Grass Cloggers, 9 p.m., 1429 Hill.
The real 'Animal House'
It reads like a scene straight out of the movie "Animal House."
Fraternities reknowned for guzzling beer, promoting vicious pranks
and generally running amuck, are finally closed down by college
administrators. But it's not a scene from the hit movie, nor is it a
preview of a sequel to the flick; instead it's the real thing. The
Dartmouth College faculty voted Monday to close the school's 20
fraternities and two sororities, saying they encourage heavy drinking
and raucous behavior. Last spring, about a dozen people were treated
for icnhnlic cnnvulsinns during "Sink Night." (the installation

WIOB Announces
IN CONCERT at the
SECOND CHA NCE
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14-9 PM

FLINT
"Don't miss the Ann Arbor Premiere of America's
fastest rising supergroup"
Tickets $6.50 On sale now-Second Chance
A SON OF BAMBOO PRODUCTION

Polo & Vittorio Taviani

1977

Padre, Padrone
A beautiful tale, a beautiful film. After living in almost total isolation for the
first 20 years of his life, a shepherd in the hills of Sardinia goes on to become a
professor of linguistics and writes his autobiography. Winner of International
Critic's Award, Cannes; Best Film of Chicago Film Festival. "A soaring expres-
sion of boundless human energy and potential. One of the most impressive
Italian films in years."-Christian Science Monitor. "You must see this film . .."
-Werner Herzog, Ann Arbor, 1977.

FRI: MIRACLE WORKER & LILIES OF THE FIELD
SAT: Alan Bates in BUTLEY
SUN: Jack Nicholson in THE LAST DETAIL

CINEMA II

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:00

MLB 3
$1.50

MANN THEATRES Wed. Matinees
FEWIN All seats $1.50
MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER
769-1300 until 4:30

SHOW
TIMES
Sat-Sun-Wed
1:30
4:00
6:30
9:05
Mon-Tues-
Thurs-Fri
6:30
9:05

- a P1 A A " P1 1 1 A I T n 1 n T 1 1 1-1 C C 17 M C C C A l T C --Ili

5 i

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