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November 07, 1978 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"Writing Poems? (Want to) Write Poems?"
FALL POETRYWORKSHOPS
AND REAINGS-Nv.8-
(SPONSORED BY THE U.M. DEPT. OF ENGLISH
with funding from the MICHIGAN COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS
EVENING READINGS
Malcolm Glass-Nov. 8
Paula Rankin-Nov. 9
William Matthews-Nov. 10
Faye Kioknosway-Nov. 10
MINCM UNION 662-4431

Page 12-Tuesday, November 7, 1978-The Michigan Daily
SACUA sends Regents letter on
presidential select ion, salaries

By LEONARD BERNSTEIN
The two major concerns of the Senate
Advisory Committee on University Af-
fairs (SACUA) are the University
presidential selection process and
faculty salaries, according to a
statement the faculty body will send to
the Regents tomorrow.
The statement, drafted at a brief

SACUA meeting yesterday, will be used
as "a basis for discussion" when the
committee holds its annual meeting
with the Regents later this month,
SACUA Chairman Shaw Livermore
said.
THE BODY repeated its stance on the
selection of Robben Fleming's suc-
cessor, calling for the Regents to "con-
template forms of continuous com-

munication, participation and con-
sultation through to the end of the selec-
tion process."
But Livermore stressed that SACUA
was asking for neither a written nor a
specific statement from the Regents.
"We aren't suggesting the exact
means" of insuring communication
between the selection committees,
Livermore said. "What we're anxious
about is that the principle is one that is
agreeable to the Regents."
THE LETTER also advised the
Regents that "faculty salaries remain a
subject of great concern. Our com-
petitive position, particularly at the
senior ranks, is eroding and it appears
increasingly difficult to attract the best
people to important positions," the let-
ter stated. "It may be time to consider
special measures to address this
question."
Both Livermore and Social Work
Professor Jesse Gordon placed par-

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ticular emphasis on salaries of higher-
ranking faculty members.
Livermore ,said salaries for full
professors at the University, ranked
eighth among peer institutions accor-
ding to a report by the Committee on
the Economic Status of the Faculty.
The same report ranked salaries of
assistant and associate professors
second or third among peer institutions.
County
postsj
on
ballot
By MICHAEL ARKUSH
Overshadowed by the more popular
local and state-wide political contests is
the race for the 15 spots on the
Washtenaw Board of ,County ,Com-
missioners.
The board appropriates funds and co-
ordinates the policies of the various
county departments and appoints the
department heads.
IN THE 14TH district, Democrat
Kathleen Fojtik is seeking her fourth
term as county commissioner. CurrerE
tly director of an assault victim aid cen-
ter, she has consistently pushed for
social services. She has also served as
president of the local branch of the
National Women's Organization. t
Fojtik's opponent is the University's
West Quadrangle supervisor Robert
'Jones. Jones, a member of the Lawyers
Club, is very concerned with high taxes'
jobs and senior citizens.
In the 15th district, Democrat
Catherine McClark is running for her:
third term on the board. She' is chair-:
man of the County Ways and Means:
Committee and Affirmative Action
Committee, and also works as a volun-:
teer counselor for rape victims.
Although Republican, Jeff Tobian is:
listed as McClark's official opponent'on:
the ballot, Tobian has withdrawn:
because of health reasons. ,
Gotham
papers
are back,
(Continued from Page i
- less than half a normal day's run -
of a 192-page tabloid were produced.
Newsstands were mostly sold out by the
time offices opened.
The Times encountered its own
production problems, finally starting
its presses at 1:30 a.m., about three
hours late. The paper rolled out 800,000
copies of a 96-page edition.
At the same time, both papers began
production of special sections of a big
Sunday edition for the weekend ahead,
and tried to make plans for election
coverage.
It's like running a 100-yard dash after
a long period without a workout," a
Times spokesman said of the difficulty
in covering the election on short notice.
"It will be a long and difficult night for.
our editors, but the worst is over.
Panel names prof
Barbara Murphy, program associate
for handicapped and veterans at the
University affirmative action office,

has been named to a national task for-
ce.
The National Association of College
and University Business Officers
(NACUBO) named Murphy to a new
task force to identify, discuss, and
wherever possible, resolve key
problems or issues in the implemen-
tation of a federal requirement.
Albert Einstein's brain, removed for
study in a 1955-autopsy, weighed 2.64
pounds-no heavier than that of the
average person.
U F

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