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November 07, 1978 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-07

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page 6-Tuesday, November 7, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Dems tc
Thompson, who has made no secret of
he fact that he wants to be President.
For potential presidential- can-
didates, the 1978 elections have also
been a chance to build up some political
I.O.U.'s across the country. Vice-
President Walter Mondale,
Massachusetts Sen. Edward Kennedy,
ind even Jimmy Carter on the
Democratic side have criss-crossed the
country for their party's candidates. On

keep Iti
teGOP side, Gerald Ford, Robert
Dole, John Connally, Ronald Reagan
and George Bush have all been busy
stumping for local Republican tickets.
The campaign appearances by the
heAvy-hitters were seen by most
political observers as a popularity con-
test, or a political lithmus test, for the
1980 presidential sweepstakes.
ONE WHO IS likely to benefit from
a big win is Michigan's own William

teir domination

Proposal D spurs
'U' voter registration

Read & Use
DAILY Classifieds
The Ann Arbor Film Coo eretive presents in Aud. A
TUESDAY, NviEMBER 7
STRAIGHT TIME
(Ulu Grossbard, 1978) 7& 9-AUD A
An unconventional and powerful film that features Dustin Hoffman's best
performance since MIDNIGHT COWBOY. He plays a self-destructing hoodlum
who finds it impossible to stay straight. "A very fine movie, brilliantly played
the sleeper of the year"-NEWSWEEK
TOMORROW: Mid Eastern Films.
I WANT A SOLUTION and THE MUMMY
soundstage presents
COFFEE HOUSE
TUES., NOV. 7-9 pm
in the U CLUB
FREE ENTERTAINMENT
Student talent performing in an
informal atmosphere
Sponsored by Union Programmng-UAC
SURSLEY REGENT
The Grand Rapids Press says Bursley prob-
ably knows more about eduction than any
other elected state official. Bursley is also
endorsed by the Ann Arbor News, Saginaw
News, Kalamazoo Gazette and Ypsilanti
Press. The Oakland Press says Bursley has
known the University all his life and knows
more aboutthe politics and financing of.
education than perhaps anyone else in the
state.
ELECT AS
UNIVERSITY OF
MIC HIGAN f.
Paed for by Bursley for UM Regent Committee
Tom Bernthal, Treasurer. 2065 Geddes Avenue, Ann Arbor, M 48104

Milliken. Should Milliken survive the
most formidable political challenge of
his career - from State Sen. William
Fitzgerald - he will become the
nation's second senior governor and a
major voice in the Republican party.
Representative John Anderson of
Illinois, among others, is one who is
championing a Milliken presidential
bid. At a campaign swing through
Grand Rapids for a congressional can-
didate, Anderson told a reporter that
Milliken is the only GOP governor who
has been able to identify with the plight
of the nation's cities, organized labor,
and minorities.
1iilliken himself is keeping his own
ambitions private, saying publically
that he has no designs on higher office
-yet.
WHOEVER WINS the governorship
here in today's voting will likely have a
Democratic state house of the same
majority as before. The GOP seems
unlikely to make any inroads into the
Milliken-F-
(Continued from Page 1)
races.
The latest Market Opinion Research
poll, released yesterday by the Detroit
News and WJBK-TV, showed Governor
William Milliken leading Fitzgerald 47
to 45 per cent, with 8 per cent un-
decided. That prediction puts the race
in a dead heat.
EARLIER, IN their second and final
televised debate, Milliken and Fit-
zgerald angrily bickered over the PBB
issue for 15 minutes, ignoring the
moderator's pleas to move on to other
topics.
Fitzgerald, a Democratic state
senator from Detroit, accused the in-
cumbent Republican of "wrapping
yourself in the flag of Michigan" to
REGENCY TRAVEL
PRESENTS
AIR ONLY
SPECIALS

Democrats' current majority.
Only in the state senate does the GOP
realistically expect to make some
tangible gains. The game-plan for cap-
turing control of the senate rests. on:
" Republicans keeping the 14 seats
they now hold;
" Taking away five key Democratic
seats, including the two seats formerly
held by Democrats John Otterbacher
and Anthony Derezinski; and
" Seeing Milliken re-elected, giving
the Republicans the tie-breaking
lieutenant governor's vote.
Democrats now have a 24-14 majority
and have controlled the chamber for
four years.
About 5,000 of the nation's 7,562 state
houses are currently held by
Democrats. The national GOP is
worried about what will happen to
congressional districts when the
Democratic-controlled state
legislatures begin redistricting after
the 1980 census.
itzgerald d
protect himself from criticism of how
he handled the PBB aftermath.
"THE SITTING on his duff for 24 long
months allowed tons and tons of con-
taminants to enter the food chain in this
state," Fitzgerald charged. "The point
is, you didn't respond."
Mildken, however, defended his han-
dling of the matter, emphasizing that
PBB is no longer a , problem in
Michigan. He said Fitzgerald, who was
the state Senate's majority leader at
the height of the PBB controversy, only
discovered PBB when it was politically
expedient for him to do so-during the
1978 campaign.
"Where was Senator Fitzgerald when
we needed him to help lower the
tolerance level?; " Milliken asked.
THE 56-YEiR-OLD governor said
"what is important to note is that PBB
is out of the food chain."
The hour-long debate was taped Sun-
day at WKAR-TV studios in East Lan-
sing for broadcast later Sunday and
yesterday.
The most heated exchange between
the two came after Milliken said he
would accept a pay raise only if it
reflected the cost of living increase and
he had rejected such increases three or
four times. Fitzgerald said he would not
hesitate to accept a raise if it was a fair
one.
"I SUPPOSE IF I were a millionaire
department store owner from Traverse

By ELISA ISAACSON
University voter registration has ex-
ceeded last year's total by 75 per cent,
due to local bars seeking to defeat the
ballot proposal to raise the drinking age
to 21.
"A large number of students, as they,
were registering, said 'I'm doing this to
vote against Proposal D'," said Leah
Gunn, vice-chairperson of the city's
Democratic party.
THE REGISTRATION boom can also
be attributed to the typical workhorse
efforts of local Democrats.
"We just went to every door we could,
and we set up voter registration
stations," said Gunn.
Former City Councilman Jamie
Kenworthy, coordinator of the
Democrats' registration campaign,
said the increase "should help" but said
students have been voting less for the
Democratic party since the late 1960s.
"SINCE THE end of the Vietnam
War, young people less and less think of
[ebate held
City, I might not accept a raise," Fit-
zgerald commented.
"That was a gratuitous comment to
make," Milliken snapped..
"That was a gratuitous offer," Fit-
zgerald retorted, referring to his op-
ponent's rejection of the pay raise.
MILLIKEN ALSO challenged what
he said were statements by Fitzgerald
that he would fire all 19 state depar-
tment heads if he were elected. He said
only 10 such people could be ousted by
the governor since the others are either
electred or appointed by commissions.
Fitzgerald denied every saying he
would fire department heads beyond
the authority of the governor's office.
But Milliken wouldn't drop the issue
so fast.
"I have very clear documentation of
Senator Fitzgerald's repeated
statements to that effect (that he would
fire all 19 department heads)," the
governor stated.
DESPITE THEIR sharp
disagreements over PBB, the two found
themselves enunciating similar stances
on some side issues.
Both said they would oppose a
referendum to cancel motor vehicle
weight taxes that were approved by the
legislature in September. The can-
didates also questioned the disposal of
nuclear wastes in the state and said
they were against offshore drilling for
oil and gas in the Great Lakes.

themselves as a separate category,"
said Kenworthy.
The former councilman speculates
the increase in student registration is
also due to "young persons making up
for the fact that they did not register
when they were at their parents' houses
during the summer."
Kenworthy added that during years
of a presidential election, students don't
register but this year's drinking age
proposal on the ballot prompted them to
register when they returned to school in
September.
ALTHOUGH not formally organizing
a drive to increase student registration,
local Republicans have urged them to
vote Republican and reverse the
students' traditional Democratic
alliance.
But Bill Kearns, Republican Rep.
Carl-Pursell's press secretary, said the.
increase is "great and the more people:
who vote, the better the decisions."
Kearns said the rise in student
registration doesn't threaten Pursell"s "
chances for re-election and stressed
that more students should be
registered, regardless of their political
loyalties.
"Even if we are threatened, that's the
way it should be,"said Kearns.
Bullard
Buchanan" .,

differ on

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REGENCY TRAVEL
The Friendly Tour Store on the Corner
665-6122
601 E. WILUAM
(CORNER MAYNARO)
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
48104.
STI.

Headlee
By SHELLEY WOLSON
Although the race for the 53rd
district's state representative hasn't,
been characterizedby the vicious back-
biting of other campaigns, it never-
theless has had its share of debate and:.
disagreement.
It's the issues that separate the two,
candidates in this race, with incumbent
Democrat Perry Bullard facing -
Republican challenger and political
newcomer Doug Buchanan. But
Buchanan also faces another tough-.
issue-Bullard's record as an experien-
ced legislator.
THE HEADLEE proposal, which,;
would limit state taxes and spending to
the present 9.5 per cent of Michigan's
combined personal income, has been
Bullard and Buchanan's major issue of
disagreement.
Bullard has repeatedly warned
voters that Headlee's passage will cut
into education and social service funds.,
Bullard is also worried over the treat-
ment of the aged, which he says will not
improve if Headlee is implemented.
Buchanan, however, says Headlee.
will not affect funds for education. His a
major campaign thrust has been to.
echo the general Republican desire to
cut down on government spending.
OTHER ISSUES the two state
representative hopefuls are divided on
include divestiture of University
holdings with corporations that operate
in South Africa, and proposal A, which
vould reconvene the state con-
stitutional convention. Bullard supports
the proposal and divestiture, while
Buchanan objects to both.
Bullard also favors an economic
boycott of states who haven't ratifie'd
the ERA, while Buchanan, though he
favors ratification, opposes such
boycotts.
Bullard and Buchanan hold similar
views on marijuana, with Buchanan
favoring immediate legalization and
Bullard calling for decriminalization as,
a first step. The state candidates also.
agree on the need for more government,
involvement in solar and nuclear
research.
But 27-year-old Buchanan's major
obstacle has been to overcome his op-
ponent's six years worth of familiarity, w
with the voters. Buchanan chose., to..
conduct a strict door-to-door campaign,..
covering every precinct in the 53rd
district.t.
The 36-year-old Bullard, meanwhile,
made appearances at several fun-.
draisers and organizations, with dorms,
serving one of his major priorities, sin-
ce he worried about incoming freshper-
sons' unfamiliarity with his record.
TECHNOLOGY AND

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