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November 07, 1978 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-07

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Ifr YOU SEE NS 4CAL ~iZ DAIY

Israel, Egypt ready
final treaty proposals

The polls.
Public opinion polls taken before elections make interesting
reading. The politicians say they don't trust polls, unless they are
shown to be leading, of course, then they mention them constantly to
show proof that their campaign is successful. The major polls released
this weekend show that the races for statewide office are quite close,
although some of the results seem to conflict.
In the Governor's race a poll conducted by Louis Harris and
Associates for the Detroit Free Press and wxyz-TV shows that among
the likely voters Governor William Milliken leads State Senator
William Fitzgerald by 13 per cent, 50 to 37, with 13 per cent undecided.
However the same pollsters show the race in a dead heat, 46 per cent to
46 per cent with eight per cent undecided. Since the weather people are
predicting a sunny day it is likely that some of the voters who may not
usually vote will vote this time. Another poll conducted by Frederick
Currier.and Barbara Bryant of Market Opinion Research for the
Detroit News and WJBK-CBS shows Milliken with 47 per cent of the
likely voters and Fitzgerald with 45 per cent of that vote with 8 per cent
undecided. Among all voters, however, the same pollsters show
Fitzgerald with 47 per cent, Milliken 46 per cent, and seven per cent
undecided.
In the United States Senate race the Louis Harris poll shows Carl
Levin, the Democratic challenger leading Republican incumbent
Robert Griffin 46 to 37 per cent among likely voters with 17 per cent
undecided. The Market opinion research poll shows a much closer
race. Levin has 47 per cent to Griffin's 45 per cent with eight per cent
undecided.
On the tax proposals on today's ballot Market Opinion Research
a shows all three to be losing support. Proposal E, the so-called Headlee
5 ° amendment, has 51 per cent support among likely voters. The Harris
poll shows 35 per cent of the voters in favor of Headlee, 33 per cent
opposed, and 32 per cent undecided. On Proposal J, the so-called Tisch
amendment, Market Opinion Research shows 4 per cent in favor, 40
per cent opposed and 20 per cent undecided among the likely voters.
On proposal J the Harris pol shows 33 per cent in favor, 43 per cent
opposed, and 24 per cent undecided. On proposal H, the voucher plan
for education, the Harris poll shows 27 per cent of the likely voters in
favor , 53 per cent opposed and 20 per cent undecided. The Market
Opinion Research poll shows 30 per cent of the likely voters in favor of
the proposal, 54 per cent opposed and 20 per cent undecided.Remember
to vote..
Exile speaks on rights
Noted Soviet dissident Zhores Medvedev is capping off a two day
- visit to the Universdity campus with a talk tonight on Carter's human
rights policy. The lecture begins at 8 p.m. in MLB Aud. 3. ZMedvedev,
a biologist and long-time human rights activist in the Soviet Union,
was stripped of his citizenship while visiting Britain in 1973. He was
instrumental in publicizing abuses of Soviet psychistry to suppress
opponent of the government through his book "A Question of
Madness."
Take ten
Today is not only election day, but the 61st anniversary of the
Bolshevik Revolution and on Nov. 7, 1968, Russian Defense Minister
Andrei Grechko delivered a keynote address in Moscow omitting the
usual direct attacks on the U.S. and the Vietnam War, reflecting
growing ties with this country. Also that day, the student government
(then Student Government Council) demanded sororities end racial
discrimination and considered filing a complaint against Students for
a Democratic Society for defacing the Administration Building during
a sit-in.
Happenings
FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - Straight Time, 7, 9 p.m., Angell Hall Aud.
A.
Cinema Guild-The Soldier's Prayer, 7:30 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
PERFORMANCES
Music at Mid-Day-noon, Pendleton Center.
Union Programming-Coffee House, 8 p.m., University Club,
Michigan Union.
Residential College-Jane Shore, poetry reading, 8 p.m., Benzinger
Library, East Quad.
University Musical Society-Swiss wind ensemble I Divertimento,
8:30 p.m., Rackham Auditorium.
SPEAKERS
International Center-"UN: Organization for Development and
Population Assistancee, "Professor Gayle Ness, noon, International
Center Recreation Room.
Law School-The Trial of Sami Esmail, Monroe Friedman, Hofstra
Law School, 1:30 p.m., Law School.
Environmental Studies-"Ethics, Animal Rights," L. Loeb, 3 p.m.,
1528 C. C. Little.
Journalism-"International Communication," Wilbur Schramm,
3:30 p.m., 2040 LSA.
- - MSA-"Islam-Peace with Justice, Is It Possible?" D. Siddique, 4
p.m., Kuenzel Room, Michigan Union.
Population Studies Center-"The Demography of Israel," Roberto
Bachi, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 4 p.m., East Conference
Room, Rackham Building.

Bioengineering-"Biomechanics of Wrist and Hand Injuries," Don
Chaffin, 4 p.m., 1042 East Engineering.
Child Development, Social Policy-"Child Care in the 1980's," Mary
Rowe, special assistant to the President and chancellor on women and
work, MIT, 4-5:30 p.m., Schorling Auditorium.
History of Art-"The Traffic in Old Masters Paintings in 19th
Century Britain - William Buchanan and His Friends," Hugh
Brigstocke, curator, European painting, National Gallery of Scotland,
4:10 p.m.. Angell Hall Auditorium D.
Ann Arbor Committee for Human Rights in Latin America -
Mexico: Contours of a Crisis, James D. Cockcroft, Rutgers
University, Sheldon Liss, University of Akron, Julia Preston,
journalist, "The Legacy of the Mexican Revolution," 7:30 p.m.,
Schorling Auditorium.
Center for Russian and Eastern European Studies - "The Impact of
b the United States Human Rights Policy on Conditions in the Soviet
Union," Zhores Medvedev, Soviet emigre biologist, 8 p.m., . MLB
Auditorium 3.
English Department-"Art and Technology" Douglas Davis, video
artist, critic, 8 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
MEETINGS
North Campus Woman's Civic Group - Faculty-Staff Assistance
Program, noon, Viking Room, North Campus Commons.
Go Club-7 p.m., 2050 Frieze.

The Israeli Cabinet ordered Defense
Minister Ezer Weizman back to
Washington with instructions to
renegotiate some previously agreed-
upon points before wrapping up talks on
the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty.
In Cairo, top Egyptian negotiator
Osuma el-Baz said Egypt intends to
submit its own "new points and
proposals" that may help "bridge the
gap" that is holding up signing the
nearly-completed'peace treaty.
AFTER THE cabinet spent 11 hours
in an exhaustive review of the
Washington peace talks, Deputy
Premier Yigael Yadin said Weizman
left the session "with clear instructions

on how to continue and conclude the
negotiations" on the military annex to
the treaty.
"The decisions which the government
took today concern some points which
were already agreed upon but needed
the final approval of the government,
and others points which were not
necessarily agreed upon," Yadin said.
In referring to the peace treaty as a
whole, Yadin said there "are still issues
on which there is no agreement."
Egyptian negotiator el-Baz, one of the
two top diplomats to the Blair House
talks, told reporters that reaching final
agreement on the treaty will depend on
what proposals the Israeli negotiators
bring back to Washington.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 7, 1978-Page 3
University Committee
Positions
Positions are available for students on
University Committees: University Coun-
cil, Civil Liberties Board, Student Relations,
State Relations and others.
In formation and applications at
3909 Michigan Union.
Apply Daily 9-5
DEADLINE NOV.85 p.m.
The Writers-in-R sidence program at the Residential
College of the University of Michigan present a read-
ing by:
JAE SHOIRE
Poet, winneraofdthe 1977 Juniper Pize
Author of Eye Level and Lying Down in the Olive Press
TON IGHT-8 PM
Benzinger Library/Residential Colege
(East University between Hill and Willard)
The public is cordially-invited.
A reception will follow the reading.
The Writer-in-Residence program at the Residential College is made possible
in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

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