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November 05, 1978 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Transit
By JEFFREY WOLFF
Amid growing concern wit exorbitant
enemy consumption rates, the
Mith gan legislature has responded
with two transportation proposals
roioting alternative means of
transportation on Tuesday's ballot.
Proposal M guarantees state
transportation resources for public
transit and other alternatives to
pighway transit while Proposal R
promotes revitalization of the railroads
%mr"ly for freight purposes.
al M sponsored by Rep. Roy
ih R-52nd district) at the request of
vernor Milliken, would amend the
tate constitution to mandate at least 90'
-dent of gas taxes and license
e for highway related purposes
with the remainder, not more than ten
r, cent, for comprehensive transit
{ -systems, commuter rail service,
bteways etc.).
CURRENTLY COMPREHENSIVE
(ransit receives 3.5 per cent of these
revenues, although a transportation
legislation package recently signed by
Milliken increases the allotment to over
eight per cent.
The proposal also allows for up to 25
per cent of the sales tax on auto related
purchases to go to comprehensive
transportation, all of which currently
goes into general state funds. A
spokesman for the State Department of
Highways and Transportation said

proposals p
these two increases revenue allotments
in proposal M could provide over $100
million in additional funds for non-
highway transit.
Sid Worthington, who worked on the
proposal as a legislative analyst for the
House Republican caucus, explained
that proposal M "is a political
compromise since it gives something to
comprehensive transit while protecting
highway interests by means of the 90-10
formula."
PUBLIC TRANSIT agencies support
the proposal. Jim Dunn of the Michigan
Public Transportation Association is
'very excited about its passage since
for the first time it guarantees money
for public transit." Colleen McGee,
spokeswoman for the Ann Arbor
Transportation Authority, said, "we
are supporting the proposal because it
is in our best interests in the long run."
McGee pointed out that although the
proposal sets a 10 per cent limit on gas
taxes and license revenues for
comprehensive transit, the allocation of
up to 25 per cent from sales tax on auto-
related purchases more than
compensates for it by "giving us a
whole new source of revenue."
Public transit supporters also point to
another clause of Proposal M which
changes the name of the Department of
Highways and Transportation to just
Department of Transportation as
further evidence of a greater concern

romote alternatives

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, November 5, 1978-Page 9
Anim'' F nd- wan ts

with public transit. A spokesman from
the department agreed that the name
change is not merely symbolic but
indeed "does represent quite a shift in
priorities."
PROPOSAL M also changes the
name and composition of the four-
member State Highway Commission to
a six-member State Transportation
Commission. The proposed commission
would no longer appoint the director of
the Department of Highways and
Transportation nor handle
administrative matters. The director
would be appointed by the governor
which. the department. spokesman
believed would make both the director
and the commission "more accountable
to the governor."
Peter Fletcher, chairman of the State
Highway Commission is the most vocal
opponent of the proposal. Fletcher
argues that it is too inflexible and
because inserting the 90-10 formula
"locks a financial formula into the
concrete of the constitution," the
funding formula does not belong in the
constitution. Fletcher is concerned
about the deteriorating state of
Michigan's roads, repairs of which
Proposal M make even more unlikely
by "cutting down the portion for
highway purposes." He warns that
even these current revenues are
already threatened by a recent
campaign seeking 138,000 signatures
necessary to call a referendum on the
increases in license fees and the gas tax
included in the recently signed transit
package. Fletcher said "Changes in the
commission are totally ludicrous.
Enlarging the commission is clearly a
step in the wrong direction.
Proposal R authorizes the legislature
to create a Railroad Redevelopment
Authority. It amends the constitution so
the Authority would be allowed to issue
general obligation bonds in an amount
up to $175 million so that it then can
make low interest loans to Michigan
railroads. Under present law dating
back to the 19th century, state agencies,

such as the proposed Railroad
Redevelopment Authority, are
forbidden from making loans to private
companies.
Gary Olson, legislative aide to Rep.
George Montgomery (D-Fifth district),
the proposal's co-sponsor along with
Sen. David Plawecki (D-12th district),
said the proposal intends to "be an
incentive to redevelop the railroads."
According to Olson, the reason for the
lending procedures established in
ProposalR is so "the. railroads can
borrow such loans'~at low interest
rates."
OLSON EXPLAINED that the
underlying factor is the need "to attract
and retain industry since industry is
very dependant on freight rail service."
The loans would be for improving fixed
assets, particularly trackage. Olson
said 80 per cent of Michigan trackage is
below standard.
Harry Carlson, whose state office for
Rail Passenger Operations deals
primarily with Amtrak did not believe
that commuter service would be aided
much by the proposal's passage since it
is "basically freight oriented rather
than passenger oriented."
The proposal appears to have
widespread support and passed easily
in both the House (91-1) and the Senate
(24-4). William McCliptic of the
Michigan Rail Association supports the
proposal and said, "For the first time
freight is going to get something."
McClintic cautioned however, that the
real degree of success of the proposal is
dependant on legislation subsequent to
the creation of the Authority. This
legislation must establish the terms
and criteria for distributing the low
interest loans among Michigan's 26
railroads.
The Teamsters political action office
is recommending that voters reject the
proposal. A spokeswoman from the
Teamsters office said she "doesn't
think the proposal would be good for
anyone" and did not "see any reason to
help the railroads."

wol f national m ammal

By WILLIAM THOMPSON
In current society, "big bad wolf,"
"wolf in sheep's clothing," and "crying
wolf" are not generally considered as
slurs against a downtrodden minority.
That will change, however, if Doris
Dixon and other workers for the Fund
For Animals succeed in their effort to
make the wolf the National Mammal.
"The drive to make the wolf the
national mammal is an attempt to
prevent the annihilation of the species
as well as the stereotyping of animal
and human minorities," said Dixon, the
head of the Michigan office of Fund for
Animals.
DIXON CLAIMS that there is a need
for honoring the wolf because wolves
have been saddled with an undeserved
bad reputation and that persecution of
wolves is similar to that of human
minorities. She insists that making the
wolf the national mammal "will bring
about an enlightening to the public."
"The wolf represents endangered
wildlife and freedom in a healthy en-
vironment," states .Dixon. "The wolf
will stand for what we have lost and
what we must try to preserve," she ad-
ds, cautioning that there are fewer than
100 wolves in America outside Alaska
and Minnesota, and that wolves may,
soon be extinct in the continental
United States.
Dixon maintains that the wolf is an
'intelligent animal which has been
degraded and unjustly abused." She
promises that the Fund For Animals is
not trying to create cqmpetition for the
eagle which, she claims, is merely a
symbol.
The Fund For Animals is a worldwide
organization headed by columnist
Cleveland Amory, which works to
preserve endangered species and
promote humane treatment of animals.
The effort to make the wolf America's
national mammal was a pilot project of
the Michigan office which was picked
up by the organization's national office.
"On some days we receive better
than 1500 signatures on our petitions,"

claimed Dixon. "The Detroit Free
Press 'Sound Off' poll showed 86.9 per
cent in favor of making the wolf the
national mammal."
Despite their success in gaining sup-
port, wolf backers are not certain about
how the wolf could be made national
mammal. "We're not certain whether.
the President can make a declaration
or if we'll have to go through
Congress," warns Dixon.
Daily Official Bulletiff
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5. 1978
SUMMER PLACEMENT
:24}OSAB 73:4117
The Bristol Regional Environmental SCenter.
Conn.: Openings for interns in the field of
environmental education. Must have background in
natural sciences. Deadline Dec. 1. Further details
available.
Forestry Service/Fish & Wildlife Service. Filing
date Dec. 1 through Jan. 15. Further information and
applications available.
MONDAY, NO1'Ml1ER 6, 1970
D~aily Calendar:
CEW: Changing Family, Changing Workplace
Conference, Elizabeth Douvan, "The American
Family in a 20-year Perspective," Rackham Amph..
9:40 a.m.
Marc/Kelsey/Ctr. N. East/N. African Stud: Clive
Foss, U-Massachusetts, "Ephesus After Antiquity:
A Late Antique Byzantine and Turkish City," 203
Tappan, 4 p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: R. Schrock, Princeton-U., "A
New Generalized Cabibbo Fit withl Duplications for
Nre Quarks,"2038 Randall Lab.,4p.m.
CAREER PLANNING A PLACEMENT
3200 SAB
The Josephy Blazek Foundation scholarships are
awarded annually to students desiring to major in
Engineering, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics or
related Scientific fields. Application form available
atCP&P.
CEW SCHOLARSHIPS FOR WOMEN% continuing
their education at the U. of M. Applications available
at. the U. of M. Center for continuing Educ. of
women.
Pre-Doctoral Internships and Post-Doctoral
Fellowships in Clinical Psychology are offered at the
PA Brach of The Devereux Fouddation, a group of
multidisciplinary residential treatment/therapeutic
education and rehabilitation centers in Suburban
Philadelphia. Additional information at CC&P.

F.

METRO-G
JULIE CHRIST
~a
is eodf CN

OLDWYN MATER-,. A JOSEPH JANNI PROOUCTION
IE - TERENCE STAMP
PETER FINCH
ALAN BATES
, 4wJ1L~

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Located in the heart of the campus.
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Dinner 5:00 to 7:15
SNACK BAR
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Open 7: 15 AM to 4:00 P
Send your League Limerick to
Manager, Michigan League
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GOVERNOR MILLIKEN ON THE ISSUES
MILLIKEN ON EDUCATION: "Michigan's higher educational system enjoys an enviable position when compared with other
states and with higher learning systems around the world. That excellence is the result of strong state support for higher education. I
also am personally committed to maintaining quality and stability within our higher education system."
MILLIKEN ON ABORTION: "I don't urge abortions, I am not a pro-abortion believer. Essentially I am pro-choice-a choice
of that kind should rest with the woman and her doctor."
MILLIKEN ON PROPOSITION D: "To raise the age limit in this one area would be inconsistent with our recently adopted
age-of-majority. It also addresses only one element in the area of alcohol abuse-and therefore distorts it. To address drinking prob-
lems we need to take a total approach-one that includes better education and alcohol abuse prevention."
MILLIKEN ON ENVIRONMENT: "Few states have done as much as Michigan to protect the quality of the environment
because few states have as much to lose. Our success in banning polychlorinated biphenyls, banning throwaway beverage containers,
adopting a model environmental protection act and adopting truth in pollution standards for industries are all examples of Michigan's
leadership role."
MILLIKEN ON JOBS: "Over the next four years, I want to see us continue the striking progress we have made in creating new
jobs for the state. Our record shows we can do it. We have here in this state 475,000 jobs that didn't exist in 1975.'
LEADERSHIP IS HAVING THE COURAGE TO FOLLOW YOUR CONSCIENCE,
NO MATTER WHAT THE POLITICAL LIABILITIES MAY BE.

MI LLIKEN-
BRICKLEY
VOTE NOV. 7

The Milliken Years.
Good Years For Michigan.

AM - & , ANW' 1

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