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November 05, 1978 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-11-05

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, November 5, 1978-Page 7

Other races

OR THE REMAINING state executive
offices - attorney general and secretary of
state - the Daily endorses the present office
olders.
Secretary of State Richard Austin has built an
adinirahle record as a red-tape-cutter. He was
instrumental in extending drivers' licenses from
three to four years and license plates from two to
three years. Mr. Austin also initiated the system
whereby people can register to vote while
retewing drivers' licenses. He should be
reelected.
Attorney General Frank Kelly gets the Daily's
nod as well, although with less enthusiasm. On
the plus side, he has been a fighter for the public
when utilities have grabbed for excessive rate
increases. On the negative side is Kelley's
wavering support for the rights of criminal
suspects and his failure to block political spying
by:state police. Overall, though, Kelley has done
well enough to deserve another term.
Two members of the University of. Michigan
Board of Regents are up for reelection this year.
Neither deserves your vote. James Waters and
Paul Brown, both Democrats, share in the
board's moral collapse on the issue of the
University's ties to South Africa. Neither
dissented when the Regents voted to continue
University investments in companies which
help prop up the oppressive white regime in that
overwhelmingly black nation. Neither Regent
Waters nor Regent Brown voted for any
meaningful student participation in the selection
of the next University president.
Since the Republican challengers - Gilbert
Bursley and John Axe - seem to be cut from the
same cloth on the South African issues, we can't
back them either.
For the two spots on the state Supreme court, the
Daily backs incumbent G. Mennen Williams and
newcomerGary McDonald. Justice Williams has
helped build the court's record as a firm
supporter of civil liberties. McDonald seems to
be a judge who would continue that tradition.
The other incumbent, James Ryan, has been
running a law-and-order-style campaign for
reelection. His ads imply that suspects' rights
need to be subordinated to the public's need for
safety.
Finally, the Daily hopes that voters will not
neglect the races for County Commission.
Kathleen Fojtik has represented the 14th district
since 1972. A committed feminist, she has pushed
hard for social services and better county
services for her constituents.
Catherine McClary, seeking her third two-year
term on the county board, is chairwoman of the
powerful Ways and Means Committee, a post she
earned through her hard work on the
commission. She has stayed in tune with her
constituents' needs and interests. We hope voters
will keep her on the job.
Other proposals
This year's ballot is unusually large. One
reason is the presence of a whopping 11
different statewide ballot questions.
In , addition to the tax questions dis-
cussed above, they deal with everything from
a constitutional convention to collective
bargaining for state police.
PROPOSAL A, if passed, would convene
a state constitutional convention. Although this

basic state document is essentially sound, it
could use some review, especially in the area of
taxes. A constitutional. convention, is the best
way to work for a fairer system of paying for
local and state services. This proposal deserves
a yes vote.
PROPOSAL B would limit the authority
of parole boards to shorten the sentences of
people convicted of certain violent crimes. This
proposal would remove whatever incentive there
is for these prisoners to leave the cycle of crime,
or to maintain good conduct while in prison. This
plan should be voted down.
PROPOSAL C, if approved by the voters,
would allow state funds to be deposited in
savings and loan institutions and credit unions.
Only bankers have anything to lose if this passes,
while the public has everything to gain from the
higher interest rates the money will bring in. A
yes vote is in order.;
PROPOSAL D is an unmitigated dis-
aster. This bill would raise the drinking
age from 18 to 21.
Rather than ending youth drinking, this
proposal will create a new class of criminals,
whose crimes have no victims. This deserves a
resounding no vote.
PROPOSAL G would allow state troopers
the fundamental right to bargain collectively.
This is a narrow proposal, which does not deal
with the bargaining rights of other state
employees. Still, it ought to be approved.
PROPOSAL K would deny judges
the discretion to allow certain sus-
pects to go free on bail. This law
and order bill, which violates basic civil rights of
those innocent in the eyes of the law, should be
voted down.
PROPOSAL M would allow use of
some state gas money for public tran-
sit needs. This is an idea whose time
has come, given depleting energy resources.
Vote yes on this proposal.
PROPOSAL R would create a state
railroad authority to pump state funds into track
improvements. What's really needed is public
ownership of the rails. This is a step in the right
direction, so a yes vote is in order.
The tax proposals
(Continued on Page 4)
a progressive, graduated state income tax. Such
a system would tax those making $50,000 per
year at a higher rate than those making $10,000
per year. In this way, taxes would be reduced for
those who need relief - the middle and lower
classes - while the rich would finally be forced
t'T1onttibtt hcc rdattre ith their nability to
pay.
Although such a plan is not on the ballot this
Tuesday, there is an alternative. Proposal A
would convene a constitutional convention at
which the entire tax clause of the state
constitution could be rewritten. Such a
conventibn could institute a graduated income
tax.

Do a Tree a Favor:
Recycle Your Dail y

vwhaw.aw

.u,.dstag.presents
COFFEE HOUSE
TUES., NOV. 7-9 pm
In the U CLUB

F RE E E NTE RTA INM EN T
Student talent performing in an
informal atmosphere
Sponsored by Union Programming-UAC
You're invited to attend
an evening seminar
with Sheikh Sarmad Brody
of the SUFI ORDER
On: spiritual health and healing; using con-
sciousness, energy and ecstasy
"Consciously or unconsciously Date: Monday, Nov. 6
every being is capable of Time: 7:30 Price: $3.00
healing himself or others" Place: Friends Meeting House
1420 Hill-769-7397
Read & Use DAILY CIassifiedsz

Guest Artists,
Donald Sinta saxophone
William Abright piano,
Tickets at Tix- Info, Jacobson's
phone 662-5129

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r V1tIVERSITY S fYc USICAL 28OCIETY present

Th DJVLWfi lTfTO

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from the
echola Cantorum,
Eight Swiss woodwind artists
form on original 18th century ins
ments. You hear the music ofJ
zart, Beethoven and Haydn asi
-AIthemselves heard it.
For this concert the ensemble will play:
National March of Hungary........Haydn
Partita in B-flat major............Myslivicek
Trio in B-Flat ..... .. . ........... Lefevre
Divertimento in E-flat, K. 226.... . Mozart
Variations on "La ci darem la mano"
from "Don Giovanni"..............Beethoven
Octet in E-flat, Op. 103 .................Beethoven
Tickets are $4 to $7 at Burton Tower, 9-
4:30. On Tues. box office opens at 7. Phone
665-3717.
Tuesday Rovember '
at 8:30
iachham luditorium .

per-
stru-
Mo-
they

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Ann Arbor Committee for Human Rights in Latin America presents:

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Contours of Crisis

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IFAA too IHIUIC; 77"ft""%%%%

Tuesday, November 7: THE LEGACY OF THE MEXICAN
REVOLUTION
JAMES D. COCKCROFT-Professor of Sociology, Rutgers University.
SHELDON LISS-Professor of History, University of Akron.
JULIA PRESTON-Freelance journalist andcommentator on the
women's movement in Mexico.
Wednesday, November 8: MEXICANEXILES SPEAK IN THEIR
OWN DEFENSE
HECTOR MARROQUIN-Exiled Mexican student leader seeking political
asylum in the U.S.
JUAN JOSE PENA-founder of the Raza Unida Party, on independent
Chicano political party in New Mexico.
Thursday, November 9: THE UNDOCUMENTED: MEXICAN
WORKERS NORTH OF THE BORDER
ALPHA HERNANDEZ-Legal Aid attorney from the border town of Del
Rio, Texas.
PETER SCHEY-Los Angeles attorney active in the movement to protect
undocumented workers from deportation.

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